April 17th

On 17th April 1595, a week after the birth of Frances Clifford at Londesborough House, her parents gave a feast for 70 people, including friends and family and local people; the menu included caviar, 11 types of fish, lamprey pies, turbot pies, eel, mutton, chicken and rabbit, salad, cheesecake and fruit tart and custard.

On 17th April 1627, army deserter Richard Towler was taken under escort to Hull with orders to either rejoin the forces heading for Germany from which he had deserted, or be returned to York as a prisoner. 1,350 soldiers had sailed from Hull in 1626 to support the King of Denmark in the Thirty Years War.

On 17th April 1797, Hull Trinity House paid £1 5 shillings to William Taylor and Robert Masgill, of the ship Jupiter, which had been captured by the French.

On 17th April 1803, George Wallis, aged 73, died in Hull. Hull’s most prominent locksmith, he created a collection of arms and armour, and opened what may have been Hull’s first museum. His painting can be seen in Wilberforce House. His son George invented a swivel-mounted harpoon gun for the whaling trade.  (b 20.4.1731 in Lockington).

On 17th April 1878, George Herbert Stancer, was born in Pocklington. He was a sports journalist and administrator of cycling associations. He beat the record for a tandem tricycle ride from London to Brighton in 1910 (with L.S. Leake) in 5hrs 59mins 51secs. He was awarded the OBE, Died October 1962.

Geo Herbert Stancer

February 29th

On 29th February 1912, Frederick Richard Soulsby, Master of the steamship Bayardo, was examined as part of a Formal Investigation in Hull Law Courts into the stranding and loss of his ship, returning from Gothenburg to Hull. The Bayardo went aground on 21st January on the Middle Sand in the Humber and could not be refloated. Soulsby was found to be at fault, and was severely censured.

On 29th February 1920, Ronald William Huzzard was born in Hull. A Quaker, he refused to be recruited during WW2, and was an active peace campaigner; he was the first General Secretary of Labour Action for Peace, and was awarded the Frank Cousins Peace Award by the TGWU. (died 30.12.1988)

On 29th February 1960, Hull’s last sidewinder trawler was launched at Beverley. The Arctic Corsair was built by Cook, Welton & Gemmell for the Boyd Line. It is now a museum run by volunteers, moored in the River Hull.

Arctic Corsair

February 18th

Pilgr Grace

On 18th February 1537, Sir Francis Bigod entered Beverley with 3-400 men on the renewed Pilgrimage of Grace.

On 18th February 1620, The King’s Players performed 5 plays at Londesborough House over a 4-day period at Shrovetide, for the Earl and Countess of Cumberland. The Cliffords regularly had entertainment at the house, hosting 13 different companies of players, and many musicians. Shakespeare had been the company’s leading playwright (he died in 1613).

On 18th February 1657, Sir Henry Slingsby, a Royalist prisoner in the Hull blockhouse, attempted to bribe Captain John Overton and incite the soldiers to go over to the King. Ralph Waterhouse, commander of the South Blockhouse, was also approached by Slingsby, who said that King Charles had offered him a commission, and said 600 men were at Paull ready to march into Hull. Slingsby was executed in 1658.

On 18th February 1786,  Elizabeth Dearing, aged 20, died in Fitling, cause unknown. She was the 3rdgeneration of the Dearing family to be recorded in the Humbleton parish register as Papist. Later generations who died there are not so described.

On 18th February 1945, Thomas Sheppard died aged 68 in Hull. He was a self-taught geologist, archaeologist and prolific author. He devoted 40 years of his life to Hull’s museums, abolished admission charges in 1902 and increased visitors to 2,000 per week. (born 2.10.1876 in South Ferriby) see photo

Thomas Sheppard Monster Footprint

November 7th

Gunpowder Plot memorial
Welwick

On 7th November 1605, Sir John Ferne, secretary to the Council in the North, sent confidential news to the Hull Mayor of the Gunpowder Plot, and orders to arrest Thomas Percy of Leconfield. An arrest warrant was issued the following day to the Bailiff, Chief Constable and constables of the county of Hull. However, Percy and the other conspirators were heading for Staffordshire.

On 7th November 1646, Sir Francis Cobbe of Ottringham was fined £72 as a Lieutenant-Colonel in the Royalist army (a delinquent) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament. He had been a member of King Charles’ Bodyguard.

On 7th November 1887, the crew of sailing ship Earl of Beaconsfield were rescued after the ship ran aground on sands off Aldbrough; the figurehead, representing Benjamin Disraeli, the Earl of Beaconsfield, can be seen in Hull Maritime Museum.

November 6th

whalebone arch Pat.JPG

On 6th November 1584, Rowlande Wilkingson was awarded a pension of 10shillings a year by Hull town on account of his age and poverty, and the good service he had done the town.

On 6th November 1822, Hull Literary and Philosophical Society was formed to promote self education; one of its first actions was to create a museum in the Assembly Rooms, Kingston Square.  This is mentioned in Herman Melville’s ‘Moby Dick’, as it contained whale skeletons, as well as an Eskimo kayak and natural history materials. Photo shows whale jawbones at Patrington

On 6th November 1829, Robert Sharp of South Cave reported in his diary on the usual celebration of 5thNovember, with bonfires, bellringing and hare feasts in the pubs.

On 6th November 1850, Samuel Davis was saved from drowning in Hull Harbour by John Ellerthorpe, named ‘The Hero of the Humber’ for his many rescues, and awarded the Royal Humane Society’s Silver Medal.

On 6th November 1914, Herbert St Quintin presided over the last meeting of the Court Leet and Court Baron, as lord of the manor of Nafferton. Changes in the law left them with no effective jurisdiction, and later meetings were attended mainly for the Rent Dinners provided for his tenants.

October 14th

On 14th October 1498, Richard Symonde of Beverley claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt, to avoid or delay his creditors pursuing him.

On 14th October 1523, Henry Draper, a draper from Snaith, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John for debt.

On 14th October 1654, Elizabeth Roberts of Beverley was charged with witchcraft at York Castle, for attacking John Greencliffe in the forms of a cat and a bee. She seems to have avoided the gallows.

On 14th October 1854, Queen Victoria visited Hull, to huge celebrations; she knighted the Mayor, Sir Henry Cooper, at the pier. In the group of worthies welcoming her were Lord Hotham and Robert Raikes, descendants of the Hull Governor and Mayor who shut the gates against King Charles I.  Joseph Robinson Pease in his diary said ‘Hull has now wiped off the disgrace of 200 years’.

On 14th October 1869, Joseph Duveen was born in English Street, Hull. He became the greatest art dealer of his time, possibly of all time. He was knighted, eventually becoming Lord Duveen, and was made a freeman of Hull in 1929. He sold European Old Masters to the US. Donated works to the Ferens Gallery, British Museum, National Gallery and Tate Gallery. Died 1939.

 

lord duveen