Coming up this week – 14th to 21st May

This week is the anniversary of the start of the Gunpowder Plot, highlighting this area’s major role in an attempted Catholic resurgence. The tiny village of Welwick harboured at least 3 would-be killers of kings, and shows the rebellious past of Holderness.  Post-Reformation persecution of Catholics is also reflected in this week’s calendar entries.

Local heroes in war and at sea appear again, as well as the continuing toll of lives lost at sea, and the use of sanctuary at Beverley by murderers and other reprobates.

In May each year, it seems, both in world wars, air raids were particularly heavy.  Those made homeless were fed and cared for by the Municipal Kitchens in Hull, coping extraordinarily well with the worst raids of WW2.

Other events include a duel between a Percy and a Constable (2 of the area’s major gentry families), the problem of civic duties in the 17th century, a royal visit, and the death of Old Mother Riley.

 

 

April 23rd

CharlesBevGate

On 23rd April 1642, Sir John Hotham refused to allow King Charles I and his forces to enter the town through Beverley Gate. Charles declared Sir John a traitor, and all who obeyed him guilty of high treason, and withdrew to Beverley.

On 23rd April 1860, widow Elizabeth Ann Parker, 25, died at 1 Darley’s Court, New George St, Hull, of injuries inflicted by Thomas Kirkwood, 30, soldier, a deserter from the 29thRegiment. He was charged with murder and tried at York Assizes on 21stJuly 1860, but does not appear to have been executed there.

On 23rd April 1941, Private, Acting Corporal Ernest Collinson, 2ndBattalion, West Yorkshire Regiment, of Burstwick, led an action leading to the surrender of 50 Italian troops in the Battle of Keren, Eritrea. He was awarded the Military Medal for leadership, courage and devotion to duty. This was the most decisive battle of WW2 in East Africa. Many East Yorkshire men were in the West Yorkshire Regiment. Ernie was my great uncle.

March 12th

On 12th March 1511, Elizabeth Nelson, spinster of Pollington, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for felony and murder of an infant (possibly her own child) at Hull.

On 12th March 1553, on the surrender to King Edward VI of the castle and fortifications at Hull, the King granted to Ralph Constable former monastery lands in Swine, Newton Grange, and all the extensive lands formerly belonging to the dissolved Hospital of St Sepulchre, Hedon. He was also the tenant of the site of Hull Charterhouse.

On 12th March 1622, Josias Lambert, schoolmaster, left the employment of Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, after 9 months teaching ‘scholars’, which may have included some of the Londesborough House household staff and/or their children. The Earl also supported the village school at (Market) Weighton. photo shows Londesborough church

On 12th March 1647, Sir Matthew Boynton died at Bainton aged 56. Sheriff of Yorkshire twice, MP twice (once for Hedon and once for Scarborough), 1stBaronet, of Barmston. He helped capture Sir John Hotham when he intended to surrender Hull to the Royalists. His son Colonel Matthew Boynton was killed fighting for the Royalists in the Battle of Wigan Lane in 1651. (bapt 26.1.1591)

On 12th March 1697, the Brethren of Hull Trinity House charged almost £21 for the launch of the 60-gun Royal Navy ship HMS Kingston from Hessle. Work included laying buoys from the launching site to Hull.

Londesborough

March 9th

Trinity House

On 9th March 1767, Beverley Coroner’s Court jury found  (James?) Brown, aged 30, guilty of poisoning his wife, aged 45 and of independent means. Brown appears to have escaped to London, but was arrested and found guilty, his sentence commuted to 7 years’ transportation.

On 9th March 1801, at the request of the Admiralty, Hull Trinity House sent 12 Hull men as North Sea pilots to support the naval force at Yarmouth preparing to attack Copenhagen.

On 9th March 1858, servant Sarah West was overtaken by a severe snowstorm at Newbald Wold whilst returning from a visit to her parents in Market Weighton; she was under a snowdrift for 2 days, but was discovered by a shepherd and nursed back to health.

On 9th March 1984, Christopher Laverack, aged 9, of Anlaby, disappeared from his sister’s home, and his body was found in Beverley Beck 2 days later. It was not until 2012 that the murder enquiry was closed, when police identified his uncle, Melvyn Read, as the killer. Read had died in 2008.

February 20th

On 20th February 1889, ‘Riding the stang’ took place in Hedon, for the 3rdconsecutive night, for a man who beat his wife; a procession sang, shouted, hit pans, banged drums and whistled and finally burned the man’s effigy on Market Hill. Also known as charivari, skimmington, or rough music in other areas.

On 20th February 1918, former Reckitt’s employee Private George Charlton, 32, was killed in action on service with 11thEast Yorks (2ndHull Pals). Buried Roclincourt, France. photo (Imperial War Museum) shows some of the Hull PALS.

Hull PALS

February 16th

On 16th February 1803, Burnett’s Shipping List reported the arrival of 4 ships (3 from (King’s) Lynn and 1 from London). The Pearl sailed, destination not given.

On 16th February 1821, Vincent Knowles Walker, 48, battered, stabbed and kicked to death Lydia Wills White, on her doorstep at 37 Nile Street, Hull. She was sheltering her friend Mrs Walker, who had separated from her drunkard, violent husband. Walker was hanged in Hull Hedon Road Gaol.Prison

October 25th

On 25th October 1037, Aelfric, Archbishop of York, placed the relics of the recently canonised St John of Beverley in a new shrine of gold and silver, ornamented with precious stones in the Collegiate Church of St John the Evangelist, Beverley.

On 25th October 1415, Michael de la Pole, 3rdEarl of Suffolk, died in battle, with 2 of his brothers. His brother William succeeded as Earl.

On 25th October 1841, Private Stephen Bennington, of Lockington, 20, batman to vet surgeon John Gloag, rode into the Russian guns at the Charge of the Light Brigade, Balaclava, and survived.  He was awarded the Crimea Medal with clasps. Also served at Inkerman and Sebastopol and was discharged from the service in 1859 with long service and good conduct medals. Gloag did not take part in the charge.

Light Brigade