March 28th

On 28th March 1783, Alexander Cavalie Mercer was born in Hull. He was a British artillery officer who served at Waterloo and wrote a journal of his experiences. Also a painter of merit. (died 9.11.1868)

On 28th March 1854, Joseph Rank was born in Holderness Road, Hull. His father was Hull miller James Rank. Joseph built his own mill and came to automate the flour milling process. He set up the business which became Rank Hovis McDougall. He set up a number of charities. Father of J. Arthur Rank.(d 13.11.1943)

On 28th March 1864, the first train of the Hull & Hornsea Railway left Wilmington Railway Station, Hull, at noon. Financial problems caused the company to be taken over by the North Eastern Railway Company 2 years later.

On 28th March 1882, the head of Withernsea pier and the saloon were washed away in high seas, as the damage done in 1882 was cheaply repaired with timber, not iron. They were never replaced.

On 28th March 2011, Dave Foster and Mick Bateman bought Bettison’s Folly, Hornsea,  for £1 plus legal fees. The tower was built in the 1850s by brewer William Bettison, supposedly so that his servant could watch for his return home and have his meal ready as soon as he arrived. A siren was put on the tower during WW2, when it was also used as an air-raid lookout.

Bettison's Folly

March 3rd

On 3rd March 742AD, Yolfrida, daughter of Earl Puch, Lord of the Manor of South Burton (now Bishop Burton), died and was buried at Beverley. She was a nun at Bishop Burton monastery.

On 3rd March 1195, Hugh de Puiset died, aged about 70, at the Bishop’s Palace, Howden.  He was Bishop of Durham for over 40 years. He had in 1190 been imprisoned in his palace at Howden for overstepping his authority. He supported the chronicler Roger of Howden.

On 3rd March 1642, James Watkinson, jnr, Hull Alderman, attended his last council meeting; considered a Royalist, he was ‘invited’ to leave town in April, his High St house was commandeered and he moved to York.

On 3rd March 1932, Albert Digby Willoughby committed suicide by gas inhalation in a hotel in Helensburgh. Chair of the Hull Housing and Town Planning Committee, he was due to be the chief witness in the Thorpe Enquiry into corruption on Hull Council, to give evidence into the purchase of land for housing estates in Hull. He also faced trial for demanding money with menaces. He had charged commission to owners of land which he knew the council wished to buy.

On March 1984, Harry Hudson Rodmell died in Hull aged 97. He studied at Hull School of Art, and was a marine artist and commercial artist. A series of his marine posters is available for sale by Hull Museums. (b 28.5.1896)

Harry Hudson Rodmell_

February 4th

On 4th February 1516, John Holme, labourer, of Ottringham, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John ‘for divers felonies’.

On 4th February 1634, William Kitching, 39, of Little Driffield, and 9 other men, were hanged at York for rioting at Hull about corn, for demolishing the dwellinghouse of Edward Cooper, and for stealing clothes. None of those convicted were from Hull.

On 4th February 1783, Hull Trinity House accepted the proposal of Mr Blaydes of Hull to build a yacht for £500; they used the yacht Humber for 23 years.

On 4th February 1809, Ebenezer Bettison and 2 others, of Hull, drowned during a storm when going in a boat to secure a lighter which appeared to be in danger.

On 4th February 1821, Thomas Wilkinson Wallis was born in Hull. The son of a cabinet maker, he became a wood carver. He was a pprenticed to Thos Ward in Waterworks St, Hull, and trained at the Mechanics Institute. His work can be found in the Victoria & Albert Museum, London. photo shows one of his carvings

On 4th February 1900, Sir Leo Schultz (Joseph Leopold Schultz) was born in Hull. He was  the Leader of Hull City Council from 1945-79. Was awarded the OBE in 1946 for war work, including as an air raid warden, and for his campaign to provide all households with a bomb shelter. He was knighted in 1966 for services to local government. Honorary Doctor of Law Hull University 1979. d 1991. photo above

On 4th February 1968, Hull trawler Ross Cleveland capsized and sank with all but 1 of the 20 crew. An enquiry concluded the ship was unable to cope with ice build-up. The wreckage was located in 2002.

St Andrews Dock memorial

October 22nd

On 22nd October 1517, John Cook, yeoman of Sewerby, claimed sanctuary after assaulting labourer Thomas Stowpes and fled to Flambrough church.  This was not a registered place of sanctuary, but was called ‘taking church’. At a Coroner’s inquest at Sewerby on 5.11.1517, the jurors reported that Cook assaulted Stowpes on 22 Oct, giving him a wound from which he died 3 days later.

On 22nd October 1611, Lady Margaret Clifford, daughter of the Earl of Cumberland and Thomas Wentworth, future baronet, were married at All Saints, Londesborough. The Earl’s finances were not healthy, due to a protracted legal dispute with Lady Anne Clifford over his inheritance, so the celebrations were low-key, with only 40 in attendance, and a simple dinner of pasties, mince pies and turkey, a speciality of the estate. The artist Augustine Harrison was present, so that the Earl could present his 2 daughters with identical portraits of himself. photo shows Londesbrough church

On 22nd October 1882, William Butler, 16, 4thhand, was lost overboard from Hull trawler Sportsman in the North Sea.

On 22nd October 1972, the new Queen Elizabeth Dock container terminal was opened.

 

Londesborough

 

October 14th

On 14th October 1498, Richard Symonde of Beverley claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt, to avoid or delay his creditors pursuing him.

On 14th October 1523, Henry Draper, a draper from Snaith, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John for debt.

On 14th October 1654, Elizabeth Roberts of Beverley was charged with witchcraft at York Castle, for attacking John Greencliffe in the forms of a cat and a bee. She seems to have avoided the gallows.

On 14th October 1854, Queen Victoria visited Hull, to huge celebrations; she knighted the Mayor, Sir Henry Cooper, at the pier. In the group of worthies welcoming her were Lord Hotham and Robert Raikes, descendants of the Hull Governor and Mayor who shut the gates against King Charles I.  Joseph Robinson Pease in his diary said ‘Hull has now wiped off the disgrace of 200 years’.

On 14th October 1869, Joseph Duveen was born in English Street, Hull. He became the greatest art dealer of his time, possibly of all time. He was knighted, eventually becoming Lord Duveen, and was made a freeman of Hull in 1929. He sold European Old Masters to the US. Donated works to the Ferens Gallery, British Museum, National Gallery and Tate Gallery. Died 1939.

 

lord duveen

October 9th

On 9th October 1487, John Kape, husbandman of Kilham, confessed to killing Thomas Holme, labourer, with a dagger, and claimed sanctuary in the church of St John, Beverley.

On 9th October 1830, the whaler Abram was the first of the Hull fleet to return to port after a disastrous season in which 6 Hull ships were lost, and 15 from other ports.  Capt Edward Dannatt of the Progress reported the loss of his ship and the others. Most of those which returned in October and November had very poor catches.

On 9th October 1929, fire officers were called out to a fire at Howden Minster, thought to be arson. They had no access to a water supply, and had to use the moat in the Ashes Park. All 8 bells fell from the tower and had to be recast.

On 9th October 1953, Fred Elwell was made an honorary freeman of Beverley for his contribution to art. Several of his works are in Beverley Treasure House.

Fred Elwell

October 3rd

On 3rd October 1667, Mark Turington, Peter Gorbut, Christopher Gray & Jane Sansbie were fined at Patrington for having bad fences or fences in bad repair.

On 3rd October 1810, Rev George Lambert of Hull wrote in his diary: ‘times never were more alarming than the present. Failure, bankruptcies and suicide are taking place every day, and public credit shaken to its foundation. No man knows today what will be his circumstances tomorrow’.

On 3rd October 1821, Dr Raffles preached to 600 people on board the Valiant in Queen’s Dock, Hull, a new floating chapel bought by The Port of Hull Society for the Religious Instruction of Seamen. It was used for 28 years until the vessel was leaking and abandoned in 1850.

On 3rd October 1884, Elsie March, sculptor, painter and metalworker, was born in Sutton (or Old Hall, Burstwick?), one of 8 artist siblings born to foreman seed crusher George Henry March. Moved to Battersea 1901. With 5 of her brothers, created the Canadian War memorial in Ottawa completed in 1938. see photo (d 1974, Kent)

On 3rd October 1898, Ernst Adolf Powolny opened a restaurant in King Edward Street which became a Hull institution, providing high class food in opulent surroundings, as well as tea dances and catering for civic events. Closed temporarily by a fire in 1934, it finally closed after being destroyed by the Blitz on 8.5.1941. Known affectionately as ‘Polly’s’.

Elsie March