Coming this week – 4th to 10th June

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A week of regular events and the unexpected, and the foundation in 1369 of a much-loved Hull institution, Hull Trinity House, and its physical embodiment in a much-loved building (see 4th June).

Zeppelin attacks in WW1 aroused much fear and also anti-German feeling. A violent murder at a village now lost to the sea, and another in a series of extreme weather events at Langtoft make rather depressing reading.

Radicalism took different forms in different times. In the 17th century,  John Shaw and George Fox were compelling speakers who proclaimed equality as religious doctrines, making enemies of those with power and influence; by the time of the Napoleonic wars, people’s concerns were more focussed on obtaining food at reasonable prices (Hull anti-mill was a response to the very real threat of starvation).

Other events included a reference to wife-selling, to the cultured life at Londesborough House, and unusual auditory effects at Withernsea.

4th

5th

6th

7th

8th

9th

10th

 

January 1st

January

On 1st January 1151, Meaux Abbey was founded on land given by William le Gros, Count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness.

On 1st January 1645, Captain John Hotham was executed for treason at Tower Hill, London.

On 1st January 1685, Alderman Duncalf of Hull gave £5, the interest of which to be given to the poor of Patrington every New Years Day.

On 1st January 1754, Joseph Pease opened Hull’s (and Yorkshire’s) first commercial bank at 18, High Street, Hull.

On 1st January 1841, Daniel Boyes, landlord of the Angel Inn, Beverley, started a new tradition, to bake an enormous game pie for customers; it weighed more than 7 stone. In 1844 the pie weighed 10 stone, and was 18” wide, 12” high, and 2’ 2” long.

On 1st January 1904, Hull GP Dr Francis William Fullerton obtained the first driving licence issued in Hull.

On 1st January 1908, the newly created Humber Conservancy Board took over responsibility for Humber lifeboats from Hull Trinity House, which had managed Spurn lifeboat for 97 years. The Board did not seem to realise the complexity of running a lifeboat service, and after 3 years of arguments, the RNLI took over in 1911.

May 6th

On 6th May 1331, King Edward III presented Hull with a charter replacing the post of town Keeper, appointed by the King, with the post of Mayor, elected by the town burgesses.

On 6th May 1636, William Corbett and 12 other Bridlington residents created the Lords Feoffees of the manor of Bridlington to manage the affairs of the town. They still manage numerous properties in the old town.

On 6th May 1748, Hull doctor Malcolm Fleming sold a patent medicine to farmers as a preventive against the rinderpest cattle plague that raged across the East Riding, and had killed 20 cows in Hull. He claimed success for his medicine, as only a further 9 or 10 cows died, although many herds were destroyed in the county.

On 6th May 1915,  Albert Vine, engineer, 42, and crew of Hull-owned trawler Merrie Islington, out of Scarborough, were taken on board a British minesweeper before a  German U-boat put a bomb on board and scuttled her.

8th May

On 8th May 1660, the day on which it was proclaimed in London that Charles II had been King since the execution of his father, Hull ordered the arms of the Commonwealth removed from Hull Town Hall,  to be replaced with the King’s arms, and that the town’s maces be engraved with the King’s arms.

On 8th May 1926, mounted police on Monument Bridge, Hull, baton charged crowds trying to prevent volunteers signing up in the City Hall, on the 5th day of the General Strike. 41 people needed hospital treatment.

On 8th May 1941, Hull suffered its worst air raid on of WW2 overnight; 420 people killed, 800 injured, more than 800 fires; the Prudential building collapsed on top of its basement air raid shelter; 3,000 houses were destroyed and a further 9,000 damaged. 35 churches were hit, 2 synagogues, 14 schools; 2 million sq ft of factory space damaged or destroyed; notable buildings such as House of Powolny restaurant; extensive damage to the docks, including the destruction of Riverside Quay. 40,000 people made homeless in the month. A large number of commendations for gallantry were made this night and the following night – too many to record here.

On the same night, a German landmine fell on Magdalen Lane, Hedon, killing 12 people and destroying 2 houses.

May 7th

On 7th May 721, retired Archbishop of York John of Beverley died at Beverley. He was canonized as St John of Beverley, and this is his feast day, celebrated at his birthplace, Harpham, with a procession.

On 7th May 1798, Hull Trinity House paid £3 1s to John Cook, the master of the ship John and Mary, and to 8 of the crew, after the ship was captured by a Dutch privateer, and then recovered by the British.

On 7th May 1915, William (Ely) Taylor, 36, stoker 1st class and former Reckitt’s fitter, died at Gallipoli while serving with the Royal Navy Hood Battalion; he is buried in Lancashire Landing Cemetery.

On 7th May 1926, strikers clashed with police at Hull on the 4th day of the General Strike.

6th May

On 6th May 1331, King Edward III presented Hull with a charter replacing the post of town Keeper, appointed by the King, with the post of Mayor, elected by the town burgesses.

On 6th May 1636, William Corbett and 12 other Bridlington residents created the Lords Feoffees of the manor of Bridlington to manage the affairs of the town. They still manage a number of properties in the old town.

On 6th May 1748, Hull’s Dr Malcolm Fleming sold a patent medicine to farmers as a preventive against the rinderpest cattle plague that raged across the East Riding, and had killed 20 cows in Hull. He claimed success for his medicine, as only a further 9 or 10 cows died, although many herds were destroyed in the county.

On 6th May 1915, Albert Vine, engineer, 42, and crew of Hull-owned trawler Merrie Islington, out of Scarborough, were taken on board a British minesweeper before a German U-boat put a bomb on board and scuttled her.

May 5th

On 5th May 1683, Nathaniel Pickett, 28, of Hull, cut the brig Ararinah lying in the Humber and was later convicted at York Castle, where he was hanged on 30th July 1684.

On 5th May 1802, Beverley Corporation decided to create a lock at the junction of Beverley Beck with the River Hull; from that point, the Beck ceased to be tidal.

On 5th May 1853, 2 Langtoft ploughmen narrowly escaped death when lightning struck and destroyed their ploughs and killed 3 plough horses.

On 5th May 1863, Mr F.O. Martin inspected the management of the Leonard Chamberlain charities and concluded that the late Edward Thompson, a bankrupt, owed the charity over £700, and that there were other irregularities. The charity had then been operating for 147 years, and is still in existence today.

On 5th May 1915, a Zeppelin dropped bombs on Driffield, which smashed windows, but caused no injuries.

On 5th May 1930, Hull-born Amy Johnson set off from Croydon on her solo 11,000 mile flight to Darwin. She was attempting to beat the record of 16 days, only a year after her own first solo flight.