12th May

On 12th May 1585, Dr Thomas Vavasour died of diseas in Hull Castle after being imprisoned in damp and overcrowded conditions with the whole of his household for many years. A physician and scholar, he was a prominent Catholic, was excommunicated and arrested. He was buried in Drypool churchyard, which stood within the garrison walls of Hull.

On 12th May 1698, Hull grassman Hugh Stringer was given a contract by the town council to cart away rubbish, clean the streets, and ensure that residents kept the street clean in front of their house.

On 12th May 1855, Sir (William) Alfred Gelder, FRS, FRIBA was born in North Cave. As  an architect, was involved in clearing Hull’s Victorian slums and reconstructing the city, in partnership with City Architect Joseph Hirst. Liberal, Mayor of Hull 1899-1903, later MP for Brigg and Hull alderman. Received the freedom of the city 1930. Died 26.8.41.

On 12th May 1859, Paull fisherman Thomas Marritt drowned whilst fishing in Whitebooth Roads, in the Humber. His body was found in the river between Hessle and Hull in June.

On 12th May 1874, Grace (8) and Lucy (7) Cuthbert of Easington died when their clothing became trapped in the machinery of the family mill, where they were playing.

On 12th May 1903, the Prince and Princess of Wales (later George V & Queen Mary) unveiled a statue to Queen Victoria in Hull; their escort was the first task of the newly created East Riding of Yorkshire Imperial Yeomanry.

On 12th May 1915, an anonymous person wrote a letter addressed to George, at German Pork Shop, Waterworks Street, Hull, warning him that his shop was to be ‘broken up’ because of anti-German feelings as a result of the sinking of the Lusitania. Hohenrein’s Pork Butchers was attacked by a mob.

On 12th May 1945, retired Hull City Architect Joseph Hirst died aged 81 in Selby. Was responsible, with Mayor Alfred Gelder, for the transformation of Hull in the late 19thC, with the creation of Victoria Square, City Hall, and Alfred Gelder St. His designs include the Market Hall, Beverley Road Baths, Carnegie Library, Pickering Almshouses, Castle Hill Hospital. He was involved in planning new council estates in the 1920s. Wrote “The Blockhouses of Hull’ and ‘Armorial Bearings of KuH’. (b24.5.1863 South Milford) Hirst appears to have no memorial in Hull.

On 12th May 2013, Professor George William Gray, CBE, died aged 86. He moved to Hull in 1946 and worked as a laboratory demonstrator at Hull University. Went on to lead the research which resulted in LCD technology. Received many awards, including Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and Kyoto International Gold Medallist. He is commemorated in the George Gray Room in Hull History Centre.

1st May

On 1st May 1603, surgeon Simon Crouch was admitted as a burgess of Hull free, on condition that he treat the poor at his own cost. There was an outbreak of plague that summer, and Simon Crouch was known to be still in Hull in 1610.

On 1st May 1676, Leonard Gaskill, 27, and Peter Rook, 25, of Beverley, were hanged for stealing 13 sheep from John Brown of Driffield.

On 1st May 1810, Hull gunsmith William Taylor was indicted for passing counterfeit money to Cecily Rickatson at Sculcoates and given 6 months in the House of Correction. He later set up in business in Beverley, where one of his apprentices in 1821 was Esau Akrill (the Akrill family ran a gunshop in Beverley for many years).

On 1st May 1826, Harriet Pease, wife of the banker Joseph Robinson Pease, of Hesslewood Hall, miscarried after horse riding. Medical help came from Hessle; Joseph’s  diary gave his opinion that she might have died if they had had to wait for a doctor to travel the 5 miles from Hull.

On 1st May 1877, William Pritchard, 21, apprentice of Porter St, Hull, drowned on board Hull trawler Iolanthe in the North Sea whilst boarding fish.

On 1st May 1911, the Royal National Lifeboat Institution took over responsibility for the lifeboat station at Spurn, after 3 years of acrimonious argument.

 

April 15th

On 15th April 1643, Captain John Hotham wrote to Queen Henrietta Maria that he had a plan involving both Hull and Lincoln, which would be a real service to the King.

On 15th April 1696, the Skipsea manor court appraised the value of timber which Stephen Grenestowe had found on the beach at 10d, which he had to pay to the Lord of the Manor, who owned all items washed up.

On 15th April 1801, James Glenmon and 2 shipmates, returning from being held prisoner in Holland,  received financial relief of 7s6d from Hull Trinity House.

On 15th April 1807, at the Humber Tavern, Paull, compensation was agreed by the Army to landowners and tenants (of at least 3 years) when land was taken to build Paull Battery to defend Hull against Napoleon.

On 15th April 1912, Joseph Groves Boxhall, 28, was 4thOfficer on the Titanic. In charge of lifeboat No.2, whose 25 passengers were the first survivors to reach the Carpathia. (b.23.3.1884 in Hull) right on photo below

On the same day, Algernon Henry Barkworth, 48, gentleman of Hessle, was a passenger on the Titanic. He survived by jumping from the ship and later climbing aboard a lifeboat. Few people in the water survived; he put his survival down to wearing a fur coat over his lifebelt and carrying a suitcase. far left on photo, taken at Tranby House, Hessle

On 15th April 1941, a heavy air raid sank a lighter in Hull’s Alexandra Dock, damaged rolling stock and warehouses, and demolished No 22 Warehouse.

 

April 4th

 

Pat church

On 4th April 1654, Emmot Laykes, wife of John Laykes, was fined in Patrington manor court for striking Gregory Bilton with a rolling-pin.

On 4th April 1868, Frederick Parker of Hemingbrough was executed at York Castle and his body buried within the prison for murdering Daniel Driscoll, 27, at South Duffield on 29.2.1868.

On 4th April 1942, Laura Jaselli, Italian alien, of Barrow Lane, Hessle, was given a Travel Permit registered with the East Riding Police (cert 379095) as an Alien on moving from Ashton under Lyme; she was allowed 17 ½ hours to complete the move.

March 30th

john-wilson-carmichael-the-shipyard-at-hessle-cliff-1820_a-l-10072237-8880731

On 30th March 1693, John Frame’s shipyard at Hessle Cliffs launched the man-of-war, the Humber, for the Navy, of 1205 tons, carrying 490 men and 80 guns. John Wilson Carmichael’s painting of the shipyard at Hessle Cliffs is in Ferens Art Gallery

On 30th March 1757, Mary Ellah of Broomfleet was hanged at York Castle, and her body burnt, for murdering her husband.

On 30th March 1782, scaffolding collapsed while builders were installing a roof beam in the new Congregational Chapel in Fish Street, Hull; 5 men fell to the ground, 3 of them seriously injured.

On 30th March 1851, the census figures recorded that more than half of the Hull population did not attend church on the given date, and that around 15% of the population described themselves as Church of England. (N.B. figures may have serious omissions, e.g. prisons, workhouses).

On 30th March 1860, the Turner’s Trust (Beverley) charity was registered as part of the will of printer Matthew Turner, to distribute sums of £10 10s each to well conducted, honest, deserving, sober and discreet domestic servants. At its first distribution in 1862, there were 240 applicants, of whom 68 were successful. The charity still operates. Turner is buried in Coronation Gardens.

 

 

March 29th

On 29th March 1241, William de Forz II, count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness, died of illness beside the Mediterranean, en route to Jerusalem, aged between 45 and 50. At times close to Kings John and Henry III, he changed sides and rebelled several times, was excommunicated twice, having to seek sanctuary in Fountains Abbey, but was pardoned.

On 29th March 1689, Sir John Hotham, 2ndbaronet, was buried, after dying aged 57 of a violent cold. He had just been greeted enthusiastically as the new governor of Hull, having come from Holland with William of Orange. He was the grandson of Sir John Hotham, the Hull governor who turned away Charles I.

On 29th March 1759, John Courtney recorded in his diary that the Beverley Assembly Rooms in North Bar Street/Lairgate hosted ‘a very splendid show of ladies and gentlemen and a very agreeable ball’; Beverley lacked industry, but was a desirable place for gentry to build large Georgian houses.

On 29th March 1776, Eliza Bordington and Thomas Akerman, 37, of Flambrough, were hanged at York Micklegate Bar for poisoning Mr Bordington (presumably Eliza’s husband), and Eliza’s body was also burnt.

On 29th March 1874, John William Duncan, aged 12, was a member of  Hull’s Spring Bank Orphanage’s new brass band. The band gave its first performance, marching from the Trinity House Almshouses, Beverley Road, to Victoria Pier and back. They only knew 4 tunes. They went on to play by request at cricket matches, school treats and concerts.

On 29th March 1972, Joseph Arthur Rank died aged 83. The son of Joseph Rank (see 28.3), he ran his flour milling company, and became interested in films began as a way of getting the Methodist message across. He set up The Rank Organisation in 1937, producing films, and owning 650 cinemas and 5 film studios. 1stBaron Rank. (B 22.12.1888 at Chestnut Villas, Holderness Rd, Hull).

joseph rank

March 27th

On 27th March 1349, an earthquake was recorded at Meaux and in Beverley, as in much of Eastern England. The monks were at prayer, and had reached the 2ndverse of Psalm 60 – ‘Thou hast made the earth to tremble; Thou hast broken it’.

On 27th March 1570, Thomas Bishop of Pocklington was tried at York Castle, and hanged, drawn and quartered for his part in the Northern Catholic rebellion against Queen Elizabeth. Anthony Langdale of Sancton escaped to Rome, and others may have fled to exile in Paris.

On 27th March 1575, Frederick Gottfried, aged 37, of Hull, was convicted of coining guineas and hanged in York.

On 27th March 1634, Mr Vavasour of Hesslewood (we don’t know if this was Thomas, 1stbaronet, Walter, 2ndbart, or another) was riding past Micklegate Bar in York when he saw moving earth, and helped convicted felon John Bartendale out of his grave. Bartendale was a travelling musician, who had been tried, hanged and buried. He was returned to prison, and at the next Assizes was given a full pardon.

On 27th March 1679, Mary Trot the daughter of Angel Trot died in infancy in Ellerker, and was buried, even though her father was a pauper, in a woollen shroud, following an Act passed to protect the woollen trade.

On 27th March 1615, Marmaduke Stutt of South Frodingham was buried in Winestead Lane after drowning whilst walking along the road.

On 27th March 1799, George Pycock died in Hull aged 50. He was the principal architect and builder in Hull at the time. He built Mytongate jail, the Infirmary, Prospect St, and St Giles Church, Marfleet. His only surviving building is the Neptune Inn, Whitefriargate.  (b1749)

Neptune Inn