11th May

 

On 11th May 1481, Stamford shoemaker John Woodcok claimed sanctuary at St John’s church, Beverley, for the death of William de Tee, mercer of Stamford, on 30th March.

On 11th May 1812, HMS Anson, a 74-gun naval ship of the line, was launched at Paull by Steemson of Hull. In 1844 she carried 499 male convicts to Hobart, Tasmania, the largest number of convicts carried by a single ship. Was refitted as a prison for female convicts and broken up in 1851.

On 11th May 1975, Hull-born artist and architect Allanson Hick died aged 76 in Hornsea. From a maritime family, his career as an architect allowed time for artwork; a member Society of Graphic Artists, founder member of Royal Society of Marine Artists, Fellow of Royal Inst British Architects, President of York & EYorks Architectural Society. Many of his architectural commissions no longer survive, but he designed Dundee Chambers, Princes Dock Side. Several of his works were purchased by the Ferens, and he exhibited at the Royal Academy. He has no Wikipedia entry. (born 19.6.1898 89 Walton St, Hull)

April 24th

 

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On 24th April 1597, the Council in the North asked Hull and York corporations to work together and take part ownership with Roger Ashe of a new ship being built at Grimsby. Both corporations objected, and the York Merchant Adventurers joined in, asking both sides to take over Ashe’s share in the ship, as he evidently wished to pull out of the project. How it was resolved the author does not know.

On 24th April 1642, King Charles I sent heralds with a message to Sir John Hotham, giving him a last chance to admit the King to the town. It was rejected.

On 24th April 1644, Parliamentary and Scottish troops took the town of Stamford Bridge from the Royalists.

On 24th April 1882, Hull Street Tramways Company broke a strike by drivers and conductors, by engaging staff to replace those on strike. The strike was for improved working conditions, and resulted in the formation of the Hull Tramway Men’s Union.

 

March 30th

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On 30th March 1693, John Frame’s shipyard at Hessle Cliffs launched the man-of-war, the Humber, for the Navy, of 1205 tons, carrying 490 men and 80 guns. John Wilson Carmichael’s painting of the shipyard at Hessle Cliffs is in Ferens Art Gallery

On 30th March 1757, Mary Ellah of Broomfleet was hanged at York Castle, and her body burnt, for murdering her husband.

On 30th March 1782, scaffolding collapsed while builders were installing a roof beam in the new Congregational Chapel in Fish Street, Hull; 5 men fell to the ground, 3 of them seriously injured.

On 30th March 1851, the census figures recorded that more than half of the Hull population did not attend church on the given date, and that around 15% of the population described themselves as Church of England. (N.B. figures may have serious omissions, e.g. prisons, workhouses).

On 30th March 1860, the Turner’s Trust (Beverley) charity was registered as part of the will of printer Matthew Turner, to distribute sums of £10 10s each to well conducted, honest, deserving, sober and discreet domestic servants. At its first distribution in 1862, there were 240 applicants, of whom 68 were successful. The charity still operates. Turner is buried in Coronation Gardens.

 

 

February 29th

On 29th February 1912, Frederick Richard Soulsby, Master of the steamship Bayardo, was examined as part of a Formal Investigation in Hull Law Courts into the stranding and loss of his ship, returning from Gothenburg to Hull. The Bayardo went aground on 21st January on the Middle Sand in the Humber and could not be refloated. Soulsby was found to be at fault, and was severely censured.

On 29th February 1920, Ronald William Huzzard was born in Hull. A Quaker, he refused to be recruited during WW2, and was an active peace campaigner; he was the first General Secretary of Labour Action for Peace, and was awarded the Frank Cousins Peace Award by the TGWU. (died 30.12.1988)

On 29th February 1960, Hull’s last sidewinder trawler was launched at Beverley. The Arctic Corsair was built by Cook, Welton & Gemmell for the Boyd Line. It is now a museum run by volunteers, moored in the River Hull.

Arctic Corsair

February 4th

On 4th February 1516, John Holme, labourer, of Ottringham, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John ‘for divers felonies’.

On 4th February 1634, William Kitching, 39, of Little Driffield, and 9 other men, were hanged at York for rioting at Hull about corn, for demolishing the dwellinghouse of Edward Cooper, and for stealing clothes. None of those convicted were from Hull.

On 4th February 1783, Hull Trinity House accepted the proposal of Mr Blaydes of Hull to build a yacht for £500; they used the yacht Humber for 23 years.

On 4th February 1809, Ebenezer Bettison and 2 others, of Hull, drowned during a storm when going in a boat to secure a lighter which appeared to be in danger.

On 4th February 1821, Thomas Wilkinson Wallis was born in Hull. The son of a cabinet maker, he became a wood carver. He was a pprenticed to Thos Ward in Waterworks St, Hull, and trained at the Mechanics Institute. His work can be found in the Victoria & Albert Museum, London. photo shows one of his carvings

On 4th February 1900, Sir Leo Schultz (Joseph Leopold Schultz) was born in Hull. He was  the Leader of Hull City Council from 1945-79. Was awarded the OBE in 1946 for war work, including as an air raid warden, and for his campaign to provide all households with a bomb shelter. He was knighted in 1966 for services to local government. Honorary Doctor of Law Hull University 1979. d 1991. photo above

On 4th February 1968, Hull trawler Ross Cleveland capsized and sank with all but 1 of the 20 crew. An enquiry concluded the ship was unable to cope with ice build-up. The wreckage was located in 2002.

St Andrews Dock memorial

July 27th

On 27th July 1643, Hull widow Ann Stevenson, whose husband died at Beverley in Parliament’s service as a cannoneer, petitioned the town of Hull to pay her the 35 shillings wages due to him; the committee agreed, in view of her poverty, to let her have 20s.

On 27th July 1782, Rev George Lambert of Fish Street, Hull reported in his diary on a violent thunderstorm in the evening, and lightning killed a cow very near their house, and scorched the hedges.

On 27th July 1796, jockey George Heron was thrown by his horse at Hull racecourse, Newington, and killed.

On 27th July 1855, James McLoughlin, aged 13, asked Hull Magistrates Court for the protection of the court on account of his mother having beaten him severely with a stick and a fire poker because he would not go out stealing for her.

On 27th July 1996, HMS Rose visited Hull’s Albert Dock; this was an exact replica of a frigate built in Hull by the Blaydes yard in 1757 and sunk in Savannah, Georgia in 1779. The only difference from the original ship was that the sails were made from recycled plastic bottles.

HMS Rose replica

July 13th

On 13th July 1496, Bartholomew Pereson of Driffield claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of John Elyot.

On 13th July 1854, 3 men and a boy drowned when they fell off the Dowthorpe as it was being launched. About 300 people had boarded the ship before the launch, and deliberately rocked the boat. Many fell into the water and 4 drowned. A tug “Ann Scarborough’ was capsized by the number of people trying to board her from the water.

On 13th July 1936, Oswald Mosley, leader of British Union of Fascists,  found himself unable to book a hall in Hull. Mosley planned to give a speech in Corporation Fields, to recruit blackshirts to his organisation, but they were met with a large and hostile group of local people, and a riot ensued. Mosley was not able to give his speech.

On 13th July 1951, a fire broke out in No 1 Shed, Humber Dock, Hull, destroying £100,000’s worth of cargo awaiting shipping. The probable cause was said to be a discarded cigarette, and made worse by a gas leak.

Dowthorpe July 1854?