March 19th

Rose Ellen Carr

On 19th March 1293, only 5 days after his valuation of Myton, King Edward I had new records of tenants drawn up, and ordered the improvement of roads to his new town of Kingston on Hull. The roads to Hessle, Beverley and York already existed.

On 19th March 1913, Rose Ellen Carr died at Hornsea aged 70. Although illiterate, and facially disfigured, probably as the result of a kick from a horse when she was a child, she was ran a success business as a carrier and taxi owner, and was reputed to be able to carry a 16-stone sack of grain under each arm. She was also a passionate Primitive Methodist preacher.

On 19th March 1941, 92 Hull residents died in an air raid; 70 people were seriously injured.  This was the 12thraid since the beginning of the year. The National Picture Theatre on Beverley Road was hit; they were screening Charlie Chaplin’s ‘The Great Dictator’ at the time. photo below shows ruin of the cinema

On the same day, Mr & Mrs Severs and their 2 children were killed by a land mine at Highfield Farm, Hutton Cranswick. Other damage nearby probably intended for Hull included 70 high explosive bombs and incendiaries at Watton Abbey Farm, mostly in the fields, the destruction of Mrs Arnell’s grocer’s shop, and a fire in Hutton church.  Arthur Swift of Wawne Common Farm recorded a land mine, incendiaries and high explosives, which blew out all the windows and tiles off every building in the farm. The ghost of a Watton Abbey monk was said to have been seen that night.

nationalpicturetheatre

March 7th

On 7th March 1759, the allowance Hull Trinity House paid to retired grocer William Robinson was stopped as William was given a place in the Charterhouse.

On 7th March 1803, Mr William Iveson, Steward of Francis Constable of Burton Constable, agreed to Hull Trinity House’s proposal to establish a lifeboat at Spurn. No further action was taken until 1810.

On 7th March 1866, Archbishop of York called a ‘day of humiliation’ when East Riding ministers were instructed to ‘exhort the people to accept this grievous murrain as a chastisement from the hand of our loving Father’, in response to the Great Cattle Plague. Rinderpest had been introduced from Russia through Hull cattle imports, leading to widespread slaughter, and restrictions on the movement of cattle. Many areas of the country were affected.

On 7th March 1888, Rev Henry Kemp, Master of Hull Charterhouse, died after 20 years in post, having pressed for change, including an end to evicting widows when their husband died.

On 7th March 1919, after the death of her husband, Central Hull MP Sir Mark Sykes, the Hull Conservative Party unanimously voted to invite Lady Edith Sykes to stand as candidate in the by-election.  Lady Edith cited her responsibility to her family as the reason for refusing their offer.

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December 26th

On 26th December 1220, William de Forz II, Count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness was with King Henry III at the Royal court at Oxford; the King made an appointment William hoped to get; disappointed, he left Oxford for Lincolnshire, and began a rebellion, known as the war of Bytham.

On 26th December 1489, George Gusterd, weaver of Bishop Burton, claimed sanctuary at Beverley for the murder of a servant of Edward Barnaby, a gentleman. He did not know the servant’s name.

On 26th December 1495, William Middleton was threatened with a pole-axe by John of Cottingham, John of Wawne, Thomas Warde, Robert Bate, and (- ) Mykill, and was so afraid for his life that he took sanctuary in Wawne church and stayed there for 10 hours, afterwards leaving the area. He applied to the Chancery Court for leave to prosecute his attackers, but the outcome is not recorded.

On 26th December 1645, Rev Nicholas Osgodby was reported to be using the forbidden Prayer Book in secret.

On 26th December 1750, the chapter house roof of Howden church collapsed, to join the rubble of the chancel which had collapsed in 1696.

On 26th December 1890, residents of Hornsea had a fair on the frozen surface of the Mere, and a sheep was roasted on the ice.

On 26th December 1955, Roy Francis played his last game after 6 years with Hull FC, and became UK’s first black professional sporting coach, and team manager 1971 to 1973.

roy-francis

August 12th

On 12th August 1349, the Meaux Abbot and 5 monks died of the Black Death; more were to die – only 10 of the 50 in the community survived. Afterwards, their serfs at Wawne went on strike, and the monks imprisoned them.

On 12th August 1536, North Ferriby Priory was dissolved (Prior and 8 monks, and 34 servants homeless and jobless); the first wave of Henry VIII closures followed an enquiry which found that the prior together with 2 of his canons had allegedly been guilty of fornication and 4 canons of abusing themselves.

On 12th August 1646, Robert Leedes of Molescroft swore an oath in support of Parliament. Having been a supporter of King Charles I, he was considered ‘delinquent’. As well as the oath, he was fined for lands and money worth £90.

On 12th August 1895,  Isaac Leggott, water bailiff, died instantly when a shell exploded at Alexandra Dock, Hull. It was thought to be an unexploded artillery shell, and Leggott had removed the fuse, prior to throwing it in the water. Henry Cook, dock gate man, was also seriously injured.

On 12th August 1987, Ismail Sowan, Hull College researcher, was arrested when police searched his flat in Westbourne Avenue in connection with the death of Palestinian cartoonist Naji al-Ali.  They found assault rifles, bomb-making equipment, explosive and grenades. Sowan, a Mossad agent, was arrested, imprisoned and deported.

 

naji al-ali

July 25th

On 25th July each year a traditional football match was held on St James Day, between Sutton and Wawne, starting at Foredyke bridge, boundary between the 2 villages, each village trying to get the ball home. Not known dates played or when abandoned.

On 25th July 1328, King Edward III is said to have closed down the Warter annual fair on St James Feast Day because of the number of murders that had been committed at the fair. There is a record that in 1300 certain manslaughters had been committed in the village by the canons’ men from Warter Priory. In 1328, King Edward III issued an order that it was an offence to go armed into any fair or market. Probably not aimed specifically at Warter.

On 25th July 1768, Joseph Hall was hanged at York Castle for coining at Hull. photo shows  medieval coins being made.

On 25th July 1873, William Dunwell, former Hull Trinity House School pupil, lost his life at sea by jumping overboard to save the life of a shipmate.

On 25th July 1911, Father Ottway, superintendant at the Yorkshire Catholic Reformatory at Market Weighton (actually in Holme on Spalding Moor) reported on rebellion from the boys, including threats to knife masters, which resulted in the attendance of 3 police officers and the thrashing of 6 or 7 boys.

coiner, Hanse Day

 

June 29th

On 29th June 1643, Captain Hotham was arrested in Hull, but Sir John escaped and tried to cross the river to make his way to his fortified house at Scorborough. Not being able to cross at Stoneferry or Wawne, he rode to Beverley, where he found a troop of Parliamentary soldiers. He put himself at their head and ordered them to follow him.  Their commander, Matthew Boynton, countermanded the order and Hotham tried to escape through the streets, but was knocked off his horse and arrested. The Mayor, aldermen and other burgesses met to appoint a temporary Governor and committee, until Parliament could give directions.

On 29th June 1840, John Tasker was convicted of larceny at Beverley Sessions Court, and sentenced to 7 years’ transportation. At the same sessions, Joshua Needham was sentenced to 14 year’s transportation for receiving stolen goods.

On 29th June 1870, Frederick William Elwell was born in Beverley.  Painter and member of the Royal Academy, he painted portraits of King George V and TR Ferens, amongst others. His wife Mary was also an accomplished artist. (d 3.1.1958)

On 29th June 1939, the body of Thomas Smith, 27, spare hand, washed up at Paull, and was identified as one of the crew of the Lady Jeanette, which sank on 8.3.1939.

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