February 18th

Pilgr Grace

On 18th February 1537, Sir Francis Bigod entered Beverley with 3-400 men on the renewed Pilgrimage of Grace.

On 18th February 1620, The King’s Players performed 5 plays at Londesborough House over a 4-day period at Shrovetide, for the Earl and Countess of Cumberland. The Cliffords regularly had entertainment at the house, hosting 13 different companies of players, and many musicians. Shakespeare had been the company’s leading playwright (he died in 1613).

On 18th February 1657, Sir Henry Slingsby, a Royalist prisoner in the Hull blockhouse, attempted to bribe Captain John Overton and incite the soldiers to go over to the King. Ralph Waterhouse, commander of the South Blockhouse, was also approached by Slingsby, who said that King Charles had offered him a commission, and said 600 men were at Paull ready to march into Hull. Slingsby was executed in 1658.

On 18th February 1786,  Elizabeth Dearing, aged 20, died in Fitling, cause unknown. She was the 3rdgeneration of the Dearing family to be recorded in the Humbleton parish register as Papist. Later generations who died there are not so described.

On 18th February 1945, Thomas Sheppard died aged 68 in Hull. He was a self-taught geologist, archaeologist and prolific author. He devoted 40 years of his life to Hull’s museums, abolished admission charges in 1902 and increased visitors to 2,000 per week. (born 2.10.1876 in South Ferriby) see photo

Thomas Sheppard Monster Footprint

February 6th

On 6th February 1611, Stephen Taylor, steward of the household and receiver-general at Londesborough House, home of the Earl of Cumberland, bought a barrel of white herrings from Hull merchant Mr Foddle. He also bought sea fish landed at Scarborough and Carlisle, but had bought eels from Thomas Williamson of Hull the previous December.

On 6th February 1889, John William Dishman, aged 10,  Died in the care of Port of Hull Society’s Sailor’s Orphan Home – photo: memorial in Hull Western General Cemetery

On 6th February 1901, William Bernard Traynor, a sergeant in the 2ndBattalion, West Yorkshire Regiment, went to the aid of a wounded man under heavy fire at Bothwell Camp, South Africa, and was severely injured; he was awarded the Victoria Cross ‘for valour’. Traynor was born in Moxon Street, Hull. (31.12.1870)

Orphan deaths, Sailor's Orphan Home
Western General Cemetery

 

January 16th

On 16th January 1518, John Frost of Twing on the Wold (presumably modern Thwing) claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 16th January 1537, John Hallam and about 20 men entered Hull on market day, planning to seize the town and re-start the Pilgrimage of Grace. Hallam was betrayed by a man called Fowberry of Newbald, and arrested.

On 16th January 1642, William Cavendish, Earl of Newcastle, was appointed by King Charles I as the Governor of Hull, but the Parliament’s choice of Hotham prevailed with the support of the Mayor and aldermen.

Pilgr Grace

January 13th

On 13th January 1096, King William Rufus found Count Odo, Lord of Holderness, guilty of a plot to kill the King and place his son Stephen (William I’s nephew) on the throne; Odo got off lightly with loss of his lands, and Stephen went on crusade. Holderness was granted to Arnulf, son of Earl Roger of Salisbury.

On 13th January 1621, Stephen Doughton left his job as servant of the Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, and received 2 years’ arrears of wages, a total of £5 6s8d. The family was short of cash, and servants were often not paid until they left the Earl’s employ.

On 13th January 1954, the crew of Flamborough lifeboat Friendly Forester saved the 3 crew of the fishing coble Silver Line.

On 13th January 1968, a liferaft belonging to the St Romanus of Hull was found.

St Andrews Dock memorial
Zebedee’s Yard

 

January 3rd

On 3rd January 1293, a jury set up by order of King Edward I found that the Abbot of Meaux owned most of the town of Wyke on Hull, with Lords Furnivall and Vescy owning smaller parts. They found 74 tenants, and that the Abbot held court there, and that there was space used for fairs and a market.

On 3rd January 1319, King Edward II issued orders at Beverley for defence against the Scots.

On 3rd January 1629, Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, during a typical festive period for the Londesborough household, 84 staff were feasted, with 315 extra dinners and 251 extra suppers being served to tenants and guests during Christmas Week. The York Waits provided musical entertainment, in addition to the house musicians. photo shows the site of the house

On 3rd January 1933, Harry Anderson, age 19, deckie learner, of Edith Grove, Brighton St, Hull, died with 9 other crew of the trawler Endon (H161), after vessel found abandoned after a collision. Trawler Stronsay picked up his body, but superstition about having a corpse on board led them to return his body to the sea.

Londesborough Park

December 22nd

On 22nd December 1530, Beverley draper William Leryfax wrote his will, and appointed as guardians for his son Robert the priors of Watton Abbey and Meaux Abbey. In 1539, both abbeys were dissolved, and the subprior of Watton had been hanged in chains in 1537 for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace.

On 22nd December 1580, the Hull Mayor and aldermen set the price of ale at a penny for a quart and a pint outsales, and a penny a quart and a gill in the alehouse.

On 22nd December 1802, George Knowsley of Cottingham Grange held a meeting at the Duke of Cumberland, Cottingham, to propose the building of a canal from Cottingham to Hull; the aim was to reduce transport costs and establish a local grain market. The Napoleonic Wars caused the project to be shelved, and it was never revived.

December 21st

wm constable

On 21st December 1633, the Duke of Cumberland’s staff bought supplies of oysters (600 at 6d per 100) for Christmas at Londesborough House on his behalf when he was in York on business.

On 21st December 1721, William Constable was born at Burton Constable. He inherited the Constable estate, and is chiefly remembered for restoration work on the Hall, and as an amateur scientist and collector of art and artefacts; his Cabinet of Curiosities may be the most complete in any stately home. He became grossly overweight, suffering from gout, probable hypochondria and addiction to medication containing opiates. (d 18.5.1791) see photo with his sister Winifred

On 21st December 1824, Richard Arthur Worsop of Howden Hall recorded in his diary that he supported a charity which had been continued by the owners of the Hall since the 17th Century; he gave 6d each to 40 poor people of the parish, and a bushel each of wheat and coals to a further 10. He recorded several other charitable gifts in his diary, including a sheep to the workhouse.

On 21st December 1838, Hull banker Joseph Robinson Pease established, and was elected President of, Hull Labourers’ Friendly Society, having established a society in Hessle which had built a cottage there.  There were already dozens of friendly societies in Hull by this time, and this new group may have been more of a building society than a self help group. Pease was certainly no democrat (he described democracy as a ‘pestilent curse’).

On 21st December 1857, Henry Smith Bright, manager, Hull Cotton and Flax Mills, was found guilty at York Assizes of forging deeds of transfers of shares, and sentenced to 6 months’ penal servitude. His actions appear to have precipitated the closure of the Hull Flax and Cotton Mills and the bankruptcy of the partners in the Harrison Watson & Co bank on 24.9.1857.

On 21st December 1957, Edward Benn, 43, bosun, of Hull Rd, Hedon, died as result of accident aboard Hull trawler Cape Palliser off Iceland.