November 6th

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On 6th November 1584, Rowlande Wilkingson was awarded a pension of 10shillings a year by Hull town on account of his age and poverty, and the good service he had done the town.

On 6th November 1822, Hull Literary and Philosophical Society was formed to promote self education; one of its first actions was to create a museum in the Assembly Rooms, Kingston Square.  This is mentioned in Herman Melville’s ‘Moby Dick’, as it contained whale skeletons, as well as an Eskimo kayak and natural history materials. Photo shows whale jawbones at Patrington

On 6th November 1829, Robert Sharp of South Cave reported in his diary on the usual celebration of 5thNovember, with bonfires, bellringing and hare feasts in the pubs.

On 6th November 1850, Samuel Davis was saved from drowning in Hull Harbour by John Ellerthorpe, named ‘The Hero of the Humber’ for his many rescues, and awarded the Royal Humane Society’s Silver Medal.

On 6th November 1914, Herbert St Quintin presided over the last meeting of the Court Leet and Court Baron, as lord of the manor of Nafferton. Changes in the law left them with no effective jurisdiction, and later meetings were attended mainly for the Rent Dinners provided for his tenants.

September 22nd

On 22nd September 1690, Beverley Corporation gave permission to create a racecourse between the Newbald and Walkington roads. Horse racing had probably taken place on Westwood for 300 years, but this was the first time a course was formally laid out.

On 22nd September 1716, Leonard Chamberlain, draper, died at Hesslewood House, Hessle, and left property and estates in Sutton, Stoneferry, Selby, Dunswell and Hessle and his charitable bequests continue to this day. A Presbyterian, he supported those who had been discriminated against on religious grounds, gave money for educating the poor ‘of whatever persuasion or denomination soever’.  Commemorated in Chamberlain Road and Chamberlain Street, Sutton. photo shows one of the Sutton properties

On 22nd September 1761, to mark the coronation of King George III and Queen Charlotte, Col Duncombe’s Battalion of militia drilled in Beverley Market Place, and fired volleys, while the Corporation held a dinner for the officers, the bells rang, and in the evening there were illuminations.

On 22nd September 1778 was the official opening of The Dock, Hull. (It became known as Queen’s Dock after Victoria visited the city in 1854). The first ship in was the whaler Manchester, decorated all over with flags of the nations, followed by the Favourite, the largest ship in the port at 1,000 tons (burthen). 20,000 spectators were entertained by cannon fire and a musket salute from the garrison, and the great and the good were fed and sumptuously entertained.

On 22nd September 1856, Count de Werdinsky died in Hull aged 53, in abject poverty, after variously representing himself as a Polish count, inventor and doctor. He was a bankrupt, a fraudster, and had several counts of assault and indecent assault against women. His memorial is in the Western Cemetery

On 22nd September 1914, the crews of HMS Aboukir, Cressy and Hogue, 3 Navy cruisers, were sunk by a German u-boat, with the loss of 1,450 lives. This not only led to a public outcry, but also the need to provide for a large number of orphaned children. Some of the children were admitted by Hull’s Sailors’ Children’s Society and put up in its holiday home in Hornsea, as well as in the Newland Homes. By 1915, 108 children of seamen lost in action were admitted, from across the country.

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