Coming this week – 4th to 10th June

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A week of regular events and the unexpected, and the foundation in 1369 of a much-loved Hull institution, Hull Trinity House, and its physical embodiment in a much-loved building (see 4th June).

Zeppelin attacks in WW1 aroused much fear and also anti-German feeling. A violent murder at a village now lost to the sea, and another in a series of extreme weather events at Langtoft make rather depressing reading.

Radicalism took different forms in different times. In the 17th century,  John Shaw and George Fox were compelling speakers who proclaimed equality as religious doctrines, making enemies of those with power and influence; by the time of the Napoleonic wars, people’s concerns were more focussed on obtaining food at reasonable prices (Hull anti-mill was a response to the very real threat of starvation).

Other events included a reference to wife-selling, to the cultured life at Londesborough House, and unusual auditory effects at Withernsea.

4th

5th

6th

7th

8th

9th

10th

 

April 14th

On 14th April 1511, Walter Rugbe of Paull, a cooper, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of mariner Anthony Dowre of Boulogne.

On 14th April 1524, Sir Robert Constable of Flamborough, with 100 men, attacked the Rokebys’ manor house in Bishop Burton and abducted Ann Cresacre in a complex dispute over land and marriage agreements. Ann was 12 yearsold and an orphan. The case was heard in the Star Chamber. Ann eventually married the son of Sir Thomas More.  A descendant was the City Architect of Hull, Joseph Hirst. photo shows Holbein’s study for his picture of the More family – Ann is standing, rear.

On 14th April 1571, William Strickland of Boynton, MP, a leading Puritan, presented a Bill  to Parliament to reform the prayer book, including abolishing confirmation and the wearing of priests’ vestments.

On 14th April 1702, Jeremiah Northend was buried, aged 78 in Rowley. Aged 14, he had emigrated to Massachusetts with his Uncle Robert and cousin Ezekiel, with the dissenting community led by Rev Ezekiel Rogers, but returned home after about 9 years. Lived in Little Weighton. (b 26.9.1624).

Study_More_familyHans_Holbein

March 11th

bearward

On 11th March 1214, Hawise, Countess of Aumale and heir of the Seigniory of Holderness, died single, having been widowed 3 times.  In 1212, she refused to marry for a 4thtime, for which she had to pay a fine to King John of 5,000 marks (about £1700) (some sources say she died before 8.3.1214)

On 11th March 1296, John Romanus (John le Romaine) Archbishop of York, died aged about 66 in the Archbishop’s Palace, Bishop Burton; he was buried in York Minster. He protected poor villagers in 1286 by ordering his parish priests in Holderness not to demand tithes from those earning 5shillings a year or less.

On 11th March 1522, Beverley bearward John Grene was tried for slander, by calling Percevall Robson, draper, a ‘Scottish bird’. Grene apologised for speaking in anger, and was rebuked and forgiven by Robson.

On 11th March 1616, Father Thomas Atkinson was hanged, drawn and quartered at York Castle at the age of 70. Born in the East Riding and trained in Douai as a Catholic priest, Atkinson spent 30 years as an itinerant priest in the Howden area, ministering to local Catholics, and hiding in their homes. He was captured in the Vavasour house in Willitoft. He was beatified 1987. A young man at the execution bought the priest’s stockings from the hangman, as a holy relic. Identified as a Catholic, he was imprisoned.

On 11th March 1858, Brother John of the Yorkshire Catholic Reformatory took some boys, for a treat, to slide on the ice-covered Market Weighton Canal; 5 boys fell through and, attempting to save them, he also fell through the ice. They all had to be rescued by passing bargemen.

On 11th March 1859 at 6a.m., ostler John Sissons was found hanged in one of the stables of the George & Dragon Inn, Aldbrough. He was described as an aged man of respectable family. The inquest verdict was of suicide due to temporary insanity.

March 7th

On 7th March 1759, the allowance Hull Trinity House paid to retired grocer William Robinson was stopped as William was given a place in the Charterhouse.

On 7th March 1803, Mr William Iveson, Steward of Francis Constable of Burton Constable, agreed to Hull Trinity House’s proposal to establish a lifeboat at Spurn. No further action was taken until 1810.

On 7th March 1866, Archbishop of York called a ‘day of humiliation’ when East Riding ministers were instructed to ‘exhort the people to accept this grievous murrain as a chastisement from the hand of our loving Father’, in response to the Great Cattle Plague. Rinderpest had been introduced from Russia through Hull cattle imports, leading to widespread slaughter, and restrictions on the movement of cattle. Many areas of the country were affected.

On 7th March 1888, Rev Henry Kemp, Master of Hull Charterhouse, died after 20 years in post, having pressed for change, including an end to evicting widows when their husband died.

On 7th March 1919, after the death of her husband, Central Hull MP Sir Mark Sykes, the Hull Conservative Party unanimously voted to invite Lady Edith Sykes to stand as candidate in the by-election.  Lady Edith cited her responsibility to her family as the reason for refusing their offer.

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November 25th

On 25th November 1641, Nicholas Pearson, parish clerk at St Mary’s Beverley, wrote this rhyme in the parish register, as a reminder of the dates when the Catholic church traditions forbade the celebration of marriage: ‘When Advent comes do thou refrain till Hillary set ye free again. Next Septuagissima saith ye nay But when Low Sunday comes thou may. Yet at Rogation thou must tarry Till Trinity shall bid ye marry.’ However, Pearson was a Puritan, showing perhaps that many traditions continued in the Church of England.

On 25th November 1818, Hull Trinity House started a fund to build cottages for the Spurn lifeboat crew, to help the lifeboat get under way more quickly after a call. £800 was raised.

On 25th November 1857 (or 1851) died when the steam packet Empress collided with the Ouse ferry in the dark at Whitgift. 3 passengers from Sheffield also died.  Verdict of accidental drowning by the carelessness of the ferrymen. photo –  Whitgift

Whitgift

November 13th

On 13th November 1002, English King Ethelred ordered the massacre of all the Danish in England on St Brice’s Day. East Yorkshire being in the Danelaw, where Danish and English were well integrated, the order appears to have been ignored here.

On 13th November 1684, John Largeman of Patrington married for the 3rdtime; he married his second wife Elizabeth Dunn on 31stJuly, and she died in September; his first wife had died in April of the same year. It is not known what killed his 3 wives, although plague is recorded in parts of Yorkshire in that year.

On 13th November 1916, was a private in the Hull Sportsmen’s Pals Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment, at the Battle of the Ancre, WW1. His heroism in seizing German positions alone was rewarded with a Victoria Cross (for valour). (b 28.6.1897 died 21.2.1941) photo shows members of the 13th Battalion (Hull Sportsmen)

Hull PALS 13Btn sportsmen

November 10th

On 10th November 1274, Aveline de Forz, aged 10, was married to Edmund Crouchback, 2nd son of Henry III.  Countess of Aumale and Lord of Holderness in her own right, and Countess of Lancaster by marriage.  She died childless at age 15 and is buried in Westminster Abbey. The Lordship of Holderness passed to the Crown. Born Burstwick 20.1.1259

On 10th November 1293, Countess Isabella de Forz, widow of William de Forz III died, having outlived her husband and all her children, including Aveline above. A legend relates that she came across a poor man carrying a basket containing what he said were puppies, but which turned out to be seven of his children that he was going to drown because he could not afford to keep them. After severely upbraiding him for his lack of morality, Isabella adopted the children and ensured that they were looked after and well educated until their adulthood when she found employment for all of them.

On 10th November 1518, Sir Marmaduke Constable of Flamborough (known as Little Sir Marmaduke). Died after swallowing a frog (some say toad) while drinking a glass of water. Knighted for military service including Flodden a letter of thanks from Henry VIII is displayed, in Wassand Hall. photo shows his tomb in Flambrough church. & see 9.9

On 10th November 1609, Sir George Wharton, who was raised at Londesborough, died in a duel in Islington with his good friend Sir James Stuart, the King’s godson, who also died. The event was commemorated by Sir Walter Scott in his ‘Minstrelsy of the Scottish borders’. (b1583)

On 10th November 1678, Capt Towes (or Towers or Towle) of the Hull ship Shield landed settlers at Burlington, New Jersey. Many were Quakers, who settled at Burlington, Salem and other places. One of the passengers was Mr Barnes, a merchant from Hull.

Little Sir Maramaduke Constable's tomb