Coming this week – 4th to 10th June

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A week of regular events and the unexpected, and the foundation in 1369 of a much-loved Hull institution, Hull Trinity House, and its physical embodiment in a much-loved building (see 4th June).

Zeppelin attacks in WW1 aroused much fear and also anti-German feeling. A violent murder at a village now lost to the sea, and another in a series of extreme weather events at Langtoft make rather depressing reading.

Radicalism took different forms in different times. In the 17th century,  John Shaw and George Fox were compelling speakers who proclaimed equality as religious doctrines, making enemies of those with power and influence; by the time of the Napoleonic wars, people’s concerns were more focussed on obtaining food at reasonable prices (Hull anti-mill was a response to the very real threat of starvation).

Other events included a reference to wife-selling, to the cultured life at Londesborough House, and unusual auditory effects at Withernsea.

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Coming up this week – 14th to 21st May

This week is the anniversary of the start of the Gunpowder Plot, highlighting this area’s major role in an attempted Catholic resurgence. The tiny village of Welwick harboured at least 3 would-be killers of kings, and shows the rebellious past of Holderness.  Post-Reformation persecution of Catholics is also reflected in this week’s calendar entries.

Local heroes in war and at sea appear again, as well as the continuing toll of lives lost at sea, and the use of sanctuary at Beverley by murderers and other reprobates.

In May each year, it seems, both in world wars, air raids were particularly heavy.  Those made homeless were fed and cared for by the Municipal Kitchens in Hull, coping extraordinarily well with the worst raids of WW2.

Other events include a duel between a Percy and a Constable (2 of the area’s major gentry families), the problem of civic duties in the 17th century, a royal visit, and the death of Old Mother Riley.

 

 

April 23rd

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On 23rd April 1642, Sir John Hotham refused to allow King Charles I and his forces to enter the town through Beverley Gate. Charles declared Sir John a traitor, and all who obeyed him guilty of high treason, and withdrew to Beverley.

On 23rd April 1860, widow Elizabeth Ann Parker, 25, died at 1 Darley’s Court, New George St, Hull, of injuries inflicted by Thomas Kirkwood, 30, soldier, a deserter from the 29thRegiment. He was charged with murder and tried at York Assizes on 21stJuly 1860, but does not appear to have been executed there.

On 23rd April 1941, Private, Acting Corporal Ernest Collinson, 2ndBattalion, West Yorkshire Regiment, of Burstwick, led an action leading to the surrender of 50 Italian troops in the Battle of Keren, Eritrea. He was awarded the Military Medal for leadership, courage and devotion to duty. This was the most decisive battle of WW2 in East Africa. Many East Yorkshire men were in the West Yorkshire Regiment. Ernie was my great uncle.

April 14th

On 14th April 1511, Walter Rugbe of Paull, a cooper, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of mariner Anthony Dowre of Boulogne.

On 14th April 1524, Sir Robert Constable of Flamborough, with 100 men, attacked the Rokebys’ manor house in Bishop Burton and abducted Ann Cresacre in a complex dispute over land and marriage agreements. Ann was 12 yearsold and an orphan. The case was heard in the Star Chamber. Ann eventually married the son of Sir Thomas More.  A descendant was the City Architect of Hull, Joseph Hirst. photo shows Holbein’s study for his picture of the More family – Ann is standing, rear.

On 14th April 1571, William Strickland of Boynton, MP, a leading Puritan, presented a Bill  to Parliament to reform the prayer book, including abolishing confirmation and the wearing of priests’ vestments.

On 14th April 1702, Jeremiah Northend was buried, aged 78 in Rowley. Aged 14, he had emigrated to Massachusetts with his Uncle Robert and cousin Ezekiel, with the dissenting community led by Rev Ezekiel Rogers, but returned home after about 9 years. Lived in Little Weighton. (b 26.9.1624).

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April 13th

On 13th April 1280, Richard de Vescy, also known as Kesham, was offered the post of Rector of North Ferriby by Lady Agnes de Vescy, but Archbishop Wickwane ran a campaign to remove illegitimate clergy, and declined.  Richard de Vescy and several supporters occupied the church, seized its property, and beat up priests and clerks trying to obtain possession ‘almost to death’. The archbishop did not recover the church until October, and ordered some of the supporters to perform penance.  2 years later, Richard de Vesci was appointed rector of Escrick.

On 13th April 1563, Hull Mayor John Smith presided over a council meeting that agreed that no ships in the Haven should carry a fire or lit candle at night on pain of a fine; this was imposed after a vessel called the Dragon was set alight by negligence, and put other ships nearby in danger. A further law was passed in 1584 prohibiting the heating of tar on board ships, and all gunpowder had to be offloaded within 24 hours of docking, on pain of 8 days in prison, and a 20shilling fine.

On 13th April 1743, Mary Maister (nee Cayley) , her baby son and 2 maidservants, died in a fire at the original Maister House, High Street, Hull, which spread quickly up the wooden staircase.  Henry Maister rebuilt the house the following year with a stone staircase. This National Trust property is currently closed.

On 13th April 1838, Hull & Selby Railway ran an excursion from Selby to Hull, returning the same day.  From Howdendike to Hull by packet boat, arriving Hull 1.00, leaving again 5.00p.m. First class and best cabin 8shillings, 2ndclass & common cabin 6shillings.

On 13th April 1886, Ethel Leginska, nee Liggins, was born in Pemberton Street, Sutton-on-Hull. A musical child prodigy,  she made her debut performance as a pianist on her 9thbirthday, at St George’s Hall, Hull, and was playing in London’s Queen’s Hall the following year. At 11, she went to study in Frankfurt. She was a concert pianist, conductor, teacher and composer. She established the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra, Boston English Opera company, and National Women’s Symphony Orchestra, and was director of Chicago Women’s Symphony Orchestra. (d 26.2.1970) . She was the first woman to conduct many of the world’s leading orchestras, first woman to conduct grand opera (her own opera), and a pioneer for women in music.

Ethel Leginska

 

April 7th

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On 7th April 1615, George Goodgion, senior servant to Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, ordered tenants to cart coals to the big house, which was out of fuel, and to note the names of those who refused. Tenants were required in their leases to do this work, but had to fit it in with their own farming work.

On 7th April 1643, Sir John Hotham wrote several letters to people on the Parliament side; the post for London was captured, and his letters published by the Royalists at Oxford, revealing his double-dealing.

On 7th April 1787, John Morrit, 34, was hanged at York for murdering John Argyle, aka Roundell, of Howden.

On 7th April 1810, Mr William Iveson, Steward to Francis Constable of Burton Constable, proposesd to Hull Trinity House to erect a lifeboat house on Spurn Point, provide 12 crew from Kilnsea, and open a tavern to create an income for the boat’s master.

On 7th April 1828, Joseph Robinson Pease, JP, made his first committal as JP in Cottingham, of a man who disobeyed an Order of Bastardy, i.e. he was jailed for refusing to pay maintenance for an illegitimate child.

On 7th April 1893, a rioting Hull mob destroyed 37 bags of carrots being taken on rullies to the docks, and used them as missiles to attack the police.

On 7th April 1943, pupils at Paull Primary School escaped unhurt when a barrage balloon escaped its mooring in the Humber, and exploded, setting fire to the school building.

 

April 6th

On 6th April 1486, John Heryson, husbandman of Middleton on the Wolds, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for killing Thomas Metcalfe of Melmerby with a staff earlier that day.

On 6th April 1713, Brigadier General Luke Lillingstone died aged 60 in North Ferriby. He had served in Ireland and Martinique. He is chiefly known for advertising Ferriby Grange for sale due to military debts.  His monument is in Ferriby church. see picture

On 6th April 1816, George Hudson, aged 15 or 16, was fined 12s6d for bastardy. It appears he then left his affluent home in Howsham under a cloud and moved to York. He eventually became known as the ‘Railway King’.

On 6th April 1911, Hull Corporation Transport introduced free passes for blind people.

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