This Week: 1st to 7th May 2018

A wide range of topics is covered in items this week.

Crime features regularly, showing how severe the past penalties could be for crimes that would definitely not be capital offences today – and how you could get away with murder if you knew the right people, such as the King.

Deaths at sea – another perennial risk, particularly for fishermen. I haven’t checked the stats on this, but you do seem to have been more likely to be ‘lost overboard’ if you were very young. Perhaps it was lack of experience, of course, but there are historical incidents of bullying, where the skipper was king at sea. The risks also included being iced in when in Arctic waters, scurvy and starvation, collisions, and war at sea.

Heroes – the lovely Amy puts in an appearance, as well as a war hero, a sports hero, and a doctor in time of plague, who is pretty heroic in my book. As is anyone who made their living at sea. Especially lifeboatmen.

Saints – John of Beverley was huge in the Middle Ages, and he appears many times in the History Calendar, not least because the church he built was such an important sanctuary.  Why were so many people prepared to travel huge distances to sanctuary, though? Perhaps you would hope for more sympathy from strangers than from your neighbours?

Other topics this week include the Irish in Hull, invasion threats, drainage, charity, pirates, strikes, transport and medicine. And by the way – Feoffee is pronounced Fifi.

Enjoy

roger millward

January 30th

Mary Ward

On 30th January 1499, Robert Colstone of Hull and Marmaduke Pateson of  Flambrough claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley – Colstone for debt and Pateson for the murder at Flambrough of John Mottows.

On 30th January 1645, Mary Ward died aged 60. A cousin of the Wright brothers of Welwick, she spent 5 years living there with her grandmother and spent a further 6 years at Osgodby. She founded the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary and championed women’s education. She was declared Venerable in 2009. (b23.1.1585 Mulwith Yorks) see photo

On 30th January 1901, Beverley Mayor Elwell proclaimed the accession of King Edward VII to a large crowd at the Market Cross, despite bitterly cold weather and a snow storm.

On 30th January 1913, Harry Houdini, escapologist, performed at the Palace Theatre, Hull. He escaped from a canvas sea bag and straps; the challenge was signed by seamen Dan Morris, Tom Carr and Robert Mason.

On 30th January 1983, Captain Derek Wharton of North Sea Ferry Norland spent the day sailing back and forth in Bridlington Bay, having arrived back from service in the Falklands War a little too early for the homecoming celebration planned for 1stFebruary.

Houdini copy

 

 

October 25th

On 25th October 1037, Aelfric, Archbishop of York, placed the relics of the recently canonised St John of Beverley in a new shrine of gold and silver, ornamented with precious stones in the Collegiate Church of St John the Evangelist, Beverley.

On 25th October 1415, Michael de la Pole, 3rdEarl of Suffolk, died in battle, with 2 of his brothers. His brother William succeeded as Earl.

On 25th October 1841, Private Stephen Bennington, of Lockington, 20, batman to vet surgeon John Gloag, rode into the Russian guns at the Charge of the Light Brigade, Balaclava, and survived.  He was awarded the Crimea Medal with clasps. Also served at Inkerman and Sebastopol and was discharged from the service in 1859 with long service and good conduct medals. Gloag did not take part in the charge.

Light Brigade

 

October 19th

On 19th October 1469, John Fisher was born in Beverley, the eldest son of Robert and Agnes Fisher. Chancellor of Cambridge University, Bishop of Rochester, and chaplain to royalty.  He was executed for treason 22.6.1535 on Tower Hill, for speaking out against Henry VIII’s divorce, and refusing to acknowledge the heirs of Henry and Ann Boleyn as legitimate successors to the throne. A Catholic martyr, he was canonized as St John Fisher.

On 19th October 1781, Rev George Lambert reported in his diary on a very high tide which inundated many houses in Hull.

On 19th October 1826, a Huggate parish jury of 12 men, 2 affearers (assessors of fines) and the pinder, set penalties for anyone allowing cattle into public lanes at night at 2s6d per head, for the first offence, and 5s per head for every offence afterwards; for allowing pigs in the streets without a ring between May Day and Michaelmas 3d per head; for allowing geese in the streets between Old Mayday and Old Lammas, 1s; for allowing anyone to stay who does not have a certificate allowing them to settle, £1 19s 11d.

On 19th October 1890, John Connell, boatman, of Waxholme, in the Coastguard Service, took part in the rescue of crew from the Grimsby vessel Genesta when it ran aground. All were rescued, except the captain, who died of exposure. Connell went on to the vessel as it was breaking up to rescue a man too weak to help himself. Connell was awarded the Humane Society Silver Medal. The unmanned vessel broke free the following day and travelled to Withernsea.

On 19th October 1964, rail passengers took their last trips on the Hull to Withernsea and Hull to Hornsea rail lines, which closed as a result of the Beeching Report. Goods services to Withernsea continued to 30.4.1965, to Hedon 3.5.1965, and to Marfleet to 1972. photo shows part of Hornsea Rail Trail today.

Hornsea Rail Trail

 

September 24th

On 24th September 1298, an inquisition was held by the Court of Chancery into Sir Osbert de Spaldington’s goods and lands, which were taken by the king. As recently as 1296, Edward had made him Governor of Berwick, when he received Robert the Bruce and imprisoned Sir William Douglas. It is not known what the allegations against him were, and he recovered most of his land by 1300, after living on the generosity of others in the meantime.

On 24th September 1401, Pope Boniface IX declared John of Bridlington a saint. John was born in Thwing, had been the Prior of Bridlington and died of the plague in 1379, aged 59. 15 miracles are recorded during his life, and 12 after his death, including saving the lives of 5 Hartlepool fishermen caught in a storm. photo shows Brid Priory church

On 24th September 1678, the wife of Thomas Richardson of Wyton died and was buried in the Quaker cemetery in Sutton.

On 24th September 1779, Lord Rockingham, High Steward of Hull, chaired a public meeting in Hull Town Hall at which it was decided that 20 18-lb guns and military equipment due to be sent to Woolwich should be used instead to defend Hull from the threat of American attack. A few days later, the threat reduced when the Americans sailed for Holland.

On 24th September 1830, Hull gunsmith Thomas Rosindale was convicted of vagrancy, having been found in the kitchen of the dwelling house of Charles Frost of Albion St. He was sent to Sculcoates House of Correction for 1 month’s hard labour.

On 24th September 1832, Mr J. Dunn caught a 17lb trout near Driffield.

 

Brid Priory church

September 20th

On 20th September 1188, St John’s church at Beverley and most of the town were damaged by fire. St John’s remains were not found until 1197.

On 20th September 1535, John Colynson and Thomas Savage, yeomen of Holme on Spalding Moor were declared outlaws after spending more than a year in sanctuary in Ripon. They sought sanctuary in 1534, confessing to stealing a horse. Savage confessed to the murder of Amery Burdett, but Colynson did not confess, though a coroner’s jury found them both responsible, and indicted others as accessories.

On 20th September 1769, Felice de Giardini, famous violinist, played at the start of a 3-day festival to celebrate the installation of the new organ at Beverley Minster, the first festival of its type in the north of England. New music by Handel was performed, including the recently completed Messiah; tickets were 2s6d and 5s.

On 20th September 1779, Mr Foster, Bridlington quay master, reported that John Paul Jones’ American squadron of ships had attacked a large fleet of colliers and ran them into the harbour.

On 20th September 1813, Thomas Nutbrown was born in Eastrington.  Probably the same person who, aged 14 in 1828, applied to the Howden poor relief officers for some new clothes, and was granted a second hand coat. He died aged 72 in Leeds Township, Quebec, Canada, on 25 Sept 1885.

On 20th September 1883, Rev Edward Cragg Haynes died aged 62 in Swinefleet, after serving there for 32 years. Born in Barbados, classed as ’free coloured’, had links to the Clapham Sect. Set up a Grammar School in Swinefleet attended among others by Joseph Rank. (christened 3.6.1821)

On 20th September 1902, Stevie Smith was born Florence Margaret Smith in Hull. Poet and novelist, most famous for ‘Not waving but drowning’. D 7.3.1971 see photo

On 20th September 1903, Annie Marshall, 16, domestic servant, from Lissett, was raped, shot twice, suffocated with grass and thrown in the river at Scampston by Charles William Ashton, 19, of Cottingham, farmhand.  Ashton knew her well. He was found guilty of murder and hanged at Hull Prison on 11thDecember the same year.

On 20th September 1954, the Selby to Driffield rail line was closed for regular passenger traffic, a service of one regular non stop train each way plus occasional summer excursions ran until June 1965. The line was abandoned after the last freight train ran later that year.

On 20th September 1955, Robert Greenwood Tarran, of the Wolds, Beverley High Road, Hull, died aged 63. Civil engineering contractor, and founder of Tarran Industries Ltd, former Sheriff of Hull, and chief Air Raid Warden during WW2. He moved the Wilberforce monument, at his own expense, and was responsible for building 20,000 prefabs after the war. He was also suspected of complicity in profiting from deals over council land in Endike Lane, in a law case during which his colleague Digby Willoughby committed suicide.

StevieSmith

July 20th

On 20th July 700 AD, St Osanne (or Osana or Osmanna) died aged 30 (at least, this is her saint’s day). Sister of Osred I, King of Northumbria (or daughter of Aldfrith), she was a nun at Jouarre, France. Her miracles are recorded: when a concubine of the Howden rector was so impious as to sit upon Osana’s tomb, Osana stuck her to it so that she could not be removed.

On 20th July 1332, Edward Balliol gathered a fleet of 88 ships in the Humber, and joined by a number of other Scottish nobles, set off for Fife to claim the Scottish throne from the Bruce family.

On 20th July 1413, Pope John XXI wrote to residents of West Hull villages, solemnly reminding them of the judgements to come if they did not maintain the water courses providing fresh water to Hull.

On 20th July 1495, John Halyday, carrier, of Watton, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder at Watton of Agnes Lathe.

On 20th July 1631, Henry Lord Clifford made the first payment to Dutch painter Hendrick de Keyser the younger, following a fashion for painting set by Charles I; de Keyser was employed for 7 years, unusual for a great house in the North. No work attributed to de Keyser has survived.

On 20th July 1662, Rev Nicholas Osgodby was reinstated as vicar of St Mary’s after being removed from his post during the Commonwealth.

On 20th July 1798, press gang officer Lieutenant Loten was attacked in the street in Hull by a sailor with a Greenland knife, and escaped to his house. A riot began which took the militia 3 hours to quell.

On 20th July 1934, the crew of Hull tug Autocrat were rescued when she was pulled over and sank near Whitton, in the Humber, while helping the Goole tug Salvage to refloat the SS Ouse. The tug was raised and returned to service.

St Mary's Beverley