October 14th

On 14th October 1498, Richard Symonde of Beverley claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt, to avoid or delay his creditors pursuing him.

On 14th October 1523, Henry Draper, a draper from Snaith, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John for debt.

On 14th October 1654, Elizabeth Roberts of Beverley was charged with witchcraft at York Castle, for attacking John Greencliffe in the forms of a cat and a bee. She seems to have avoided the gallows.

On 14th October 1854, Queen Victoria visited Hull, to huge celebrations; she knighted the Mayor, Sir Henry Cooper, at the pier. In the group of worthies welcoming her were Lord Hotham and Robert Raikes, descendants of the Hull Governor and Mayor who shut the gates against King Charles I.  Joseph Robinson Pease in his diary said ‘Hull has now wiped off the disgrace of 200 years’.

On 14th October 1869, Joseph Duveen was born in English Street, Hull. He became the greatest art dealer of his time, possibly of all time. He was knighted, eventually becoming Lord Duveen, and was made a freeman of Hull in 1929. He sold European Old Masters to the US. Donated works to the Ferens Gallery, British Museum, National Gallery and Tate Gallery. Died 1939.

 

lord duveen

October 2nd

On 2nd October 1200, King John gave permission for an annual fair at Howden lasting a week; by the 19th Century it had become the biggest horse fair in England, but by 2007 Howden Fair had reduced to a 1-day event.

On 2nd October 1504, Thomas Henrison, husbandman of Skipsea, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 2nd October 1518, Thomas Weston, a ‘singingman’, from Snaith, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 2nd October 1541, the Privy Council of England sat in Hull.

On 2nd October 1658, Capt Robert Hildyard of Patrington left £10, half the interest of which was to be used to repair the bell frames, and the other half distributed to the poor for ever. photo shows his memorial in St Mary’s Lowgate, Hull.

On 2nd October 1738, Dick Turpin, alias John Palmer, was arrested for breach of the peace, shooting a gamecock in Brough and threatening to shoot a man. He was held in Beverley, where the JPs committed him to trial at York. It was believed that while living in East Yorkshire posing as a horse dealer, he took frequent trips to Lincolnshire to steal horses. He was hanged in York 7.4.1739. photo – Welton

On 2nd October 1883, Arthur Mallaby Illingworth, aged 7 months, died of scarlet fever. An epidemic had affected Hull since the previous year, killing over 600 people, mostly children under 5.  A brother born the following year, and named Arthur Mallaby Rawnsley Illingworth, died at 18 months, probably of the same cause.

 

August 31st

On 31st August 1292, King Edward I stayed at Kilham, on his return from Scotland, where he judged on the claims of Robert the Bruce and John Balliol for the crown, he also made several other stops in East Yorkshire.

On 31st August 1516,  Robert Chorkyls, husbandman, of Wyton, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of John Rotheram.

On 31st August 1579, Howden records state that 158 people died in the previous 5 months, at least 110 above the average, due to plague. The city of York forbade anyone from Howden or Snaith from entering the city.

On 31st August 1941, Minnie Leveson, nurse, aged 20, was killed by an air-raid on her home in Willerby; she is buried in De la Pole Hospital cemetery.

On 31st August 1943, 15 Wellington bombers took off from RAF Leconfield and 2 of them collided over Goole, killing both crews and 2 residents of North Street.

On 31st August 1946, Hull Lord Mayor Herbert Harrison officially opened Hull City AFC’s new stadium, Boothferry Park. The crowd of 25,586 were entertained by the band of the 2ndBattalion East Yorkshire Regiment. The match was against Lincoln City, the result 0-0.

boothferrypk