January 1st

January

On 1st January 1151, Meaux Abbey was founded on land given by William le Gros, Count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness.

On 1st January 1645, Captain John Hotham was executed for treason at Tower Hill, London.

On 1st January 1685, Alderman Duncalf of Hull gave £5, the interest of which to be given to the poor of Patrington every New Years Day.

On 1st January 1754, Joseph Pease opened Hull’s (and Yorkshire’s) first commercial bank at 18, High Street, Hull.

On 1st January 1841, Daniel Boyes, landlord of the Angel Inn, Beverley, started a new tradition, to bake an enormous game pie for customers; it weighed more than 7 stone. In 1844 the pie weighed 10 stone, and was 18” wide, 12” high, and 2’ 2” long.

On 1st January 1904, Hull GP Dr Francis William Fullerton obtained the first driving licence issued in Hull.

On 1st January 1908, the newly created Humber Conservancy Board took over responsibility for Humber lifeboats from Hull Trinity House, which had managed Spurn lifeboat for 97 years. The Board did not seem to realise the complexity of running a lifeboat service, and after 3 years of arguments, the RNLI took over in 1911.

April 30th

On 30th April 1513, Edmund de la Pole, 3rdDuke of Suffolk, 6thEarl of Suffolk, and his brother John were executed by Henry VIII. Edmund was the leading Yorkist claimant to the throne; he had sought help from the Holy Roman Emperor, who handed him over to Henry.

On 30th April 1584, Walter Peck and others were fined 2s8d for buying 200 fish in the Humber before it was landed in Hull. Robert Jackson and others were fined on the same day for the same offence, a total of 53s 4d.

On 30th April 1649, Henry Cave, 39 and William Cropper, 40, both of Hull, were executed outside Walmgate Bar, York, with 12 other ‘rebels’ from the North and West Ridings.

On 30th April 1859, Joseph Hoare was elected MP for Hull, but the election was declared void due to bribery, and a by-election was held in August. Hoare’s agent employed poor voters as runners and messengers at 3s 6d a day.

On 30th April 1877, brick- and tile-makers in the Newport area complained about the state of the Market Weighton Canal, which had carried millions of bricks in the 1820s, and was now too low for their barges. It took 4 years for any real action to be taken, due to denial of responsibility by the canal trustees, the local authority, and the North Eastern Railway. Commercial navigation on the canal did not die out until 1958.

 

April 24th

 

john-hotham-1-sized

On 24th April 1597, the Council in the North asked Hull and York corporations to work together and take part ownership with Roger Ashe of a new ship being built at Grimsby. Both corporations objected, and the York Merchant Adventurers joined in, asking both sides to take over Ashe’s share in the ship, as he evidently wished to pull out of the project. How it was resolved the author does not know.

On 24th April 1642, King Charles I sent heralds with a message to Sir John Hotham, giving him a last chance to admit the King to the town. It was rejected.

On 24th April 1644, Parliamentary and Scottish troops took the town of Stamford Bridge from the Royalists.

On 24th April 1882, Hull Street Tramways Company broke a strike by drivers and conductors, by engaging staff to replace those on strike. The strike was for improved working conditions, and resulted in the formation of the Hull Tramway Men’s Union.

 

April 21st

On 21st April 1499, Hull barber Richard Colyn sought sanctuary in the church of St John, Beverley, and confessed to committing homicide, and to being to an accessory, as he was present at the death of a man called Scotton, killed at Hull on 18thApril.

On 21st April 1803, Burnett’s Daily Shipping List reported 2 ships arriving from London, and 5 ships leaving port, heading for London, Hastings, Koningsberg, Amsterdam and Yarmouth.

On 21st April 1884, William Goodin, aged 34, with other mill workers, tried to put out a fire at Barker’s mill, Wawne Road, Sutton, with buckets, but was badly burned, and the mill was destroyed.

On 21st April 1982, the North Sea ferry Norland, captained by Don Ellerby, left Hull for Portsmouth, on the way to the Falklands as part of the Task Force, with 60 volunteers from the regular crew; she carried 800 men of 2 Para to San Carlos. Hull trawlers Farnella, Cordella, Junella, Northella and Pict were also requisitioned by the Navy and used as mine-sweepers. Capt Ellerby was later awarded the CBE. photo shows the Norland in the Falklands.

Norland in Falklands

 

April 13th

On 13th April 1280, Richard de Vescy, also known as Kesham, was offered the post of Rector of North Ferriby by Lady Agnes de Vescy, but Archbishop Wickwane ran a campaign to remove illegitimate clergy, and declined.  Richard de Vescy and several supporters occupied the church, seized its property, and beat up priests and clerks trying to obtain possession ‘almost to death’. The archbishop did not recover the church until October, and ordered some of the supporters to perform penance.  2 years later, Richard de Vesci was appointed rector of Escrick.

On 13th April 1563, Hull Mayor John Smith presided over a council meeting that agreed that no ships in the Haven should carry a fire or lit candle at night on pain of a fine; this was imposed after a vessel called the Dragon was set alight by negligence, and put other ships nearby in danger. A further law was passed in 1584 prohibiting the heating of tar on board ships, and all gunpowder had to be offloaded within 24 hours of docking, on pain of 8 days in prison, and a 20shilling fine.

On 13th April 1743, Mary Maister (nee Cayley) , her baby son and 2 maidservants, died in a fire at the original Maister House, High Street, Hull, which spread quickly up the wooden staircase.  Henry Maister rebuilt the house the following year with a stone staircase. This National Trust property is currently closed.

On 13th April 1838, Hull & Selby Railway ran an excursion from Selby to Hull, returning the same day.  From Howdendike to Hull by packet boat, arriving Hull 1.00, leaving again 5.00p.m. First class and best cabin 8shillings, 2ndclass & common cabin 6shillings.

On 13th April 1886, Ethel Leginska, nee Liggins, was born in Pemberton Street, Sutton-on-Hull. A musical child prodigy,  she made her debut performance as a pianist on her 9thbirthday, at St George’s Hall, Hull, and was playing in London’s Queen’s Hall the following year. At 11, she went to study in Frankfurt. She was a concert pianist, conductor, teacher and composer. She established the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra, Boston English Opera company, and National Women’s Symphony Orchestra, and was director of Chicago Women’s Symphony Orchestra. (d 26.2.1970) . She was the first woman to conduct many of the world’s leading orchestras, first woman to conduct grand opera (her own opera), and a pioneer for women in music.

Ethel Leginska

 

April 12th

On 12th April 627AD, King Edwin of Northumbria convened his Great Council at  Londesborough and agreed to adopt Christianity; King Edwin’s high priest Coifi destroyed the pagan temple at Goodmanham.

On 12th April 1748, William Kent (orig Cant) died aged 63 . This Bridlington-born architect and polymath, originator of the English style of landscape gardening, also introduced the Palladian style of architecture to England.  His buildings include Treasury Buildings and Horseguards, both in Whitehall, and Holkham Hall. (bapt 1.1.1686) photo shows his house in Bridlington old town

On 12th April 1855, John Enderby Jackson’s  ‘The Withernsea Quadrilles’ were played for the first time at a ball to celebrate the opening of  Withernsea’s first hotel, Queens Hotel, for visitors travelling on the new Hull to Withernsea rail line. Before the railway opened the previous year, the village population was tiny (108 in 1801), with 1 inn, and farming was the main occupation.

William Kent's house

April 2nd

Chas I trial

On 2nd April 1380, Alexander Neville, Archbishop of York, granted to the burgesses of Beverley the Westwood and all rights attached to the land.

On 2nd April 1607, John Alured was baptised in All Saints Church, Preston. He was elected MP for Hedon in 1640, and was a judge at the trial of Charles I. Died 1654. picture above shows the trial

On 2nd April 1652, Luke Hinderson, aged 45, of Stamford Bridge, was hanged outside Walmgate Bar, York, with 3 others, for robbing Peter Ellison, butcher of York, and leaving him for dead.

On 2nd April 1660, John Ramsden & Andrew Marvell were elected MPs for Hull; the votes cast were: John Ramsden 227, Andrew Marvell 141, Mr Barnard 113, Wm Lister 80, Matthew Allured 55 and Baron Thorp 35, in all 651.

On 2nd April 1774, George Belt of Howden was hanged at York Castle for breaking into and robbing the house of Mr Althorpe, near Howden.

On 2nd April 1785, William Riley, 23, was hanged for robbing John Borr of Hull near Newland.

On 2nd April 1916, a BE 2c aircraft of Beverley Royal Flying Corps Squadron 47, crashed at the Racecourse due to engine failure while defending the area from a Zeppelin attack.