March 11th

bearward

On 11th March 1214, Hawise, Countess of Aumale and heir of the Seigniory of Holderness, died single, having been widowed 3 times.  In 1212, she refused to marry for a 4thtime, for which she had to pay a fine to King John of 5,000 marks (about £1700) (some sources say she died before 8.3.1214)

On 11th March 1296, John Romanus (John le Romaine) Archbishop of York, died aged about 66 in the Archbishop’s Palace, Bishop Burton; he was buried in York Minster. He protected poor villagers in 1286 by ordering his parish priests in Holderness not to demand tithes from those earning 5shillings a year or less.

On 11th March 1522, Beverley bearward John Grene was tried for slander, by calling Percevall Robson, draper, a ‘Scottish bird’. Grene apologised for speaking in anger, and was rebuked and forgiven by Robson.

On 11th March 1616, Father Thomas Atkinson was hanged, drawn and quartered at York Castle at the age of 70. Born in the East Riding and trained in Douai as a Catholic priest, Atkinson spent 30 years as an itinerant priest in the Howden area, ministering to local Catholics, and hiding in their homes. He was captured in the Vavasour house in Willitoft. He was beatified 1987. A young man at the execution bought the priest’s stockings from the hangman, as a holy relic. Identified as a Catholic, he was imprisoned.

On 11th March 1858, Brother John of the Yorkshire Catholic Reformatory took some boys, for a treat, to slide on the ice-covered Market Weighton Canal; 5 boys fell through and, attempting to save them, he also fell through the ice. They all had to be rescued by passing bargemen.

On 11th March 1859 at 6a.m., ostler John Sissons was found hanged in one of the stables of the George & Dragon Inn, Aldbrough. He was described as an aged man of respectable family. The inquest verdict was of suicide due to temporary insanity.

January 10th

st mary's sculcoates.JPG

On 10th January 1308, Ivo de Etton of Temple Hirst, near Selby, and William de la Fenne from Faxfleet had been preceptors (heads) of local houses of the outlawed Knights Templar order, when they were arrested and imprisoned by Henry II on instructions of Pope Clement V. Also arrested were Richard de Ryston, chaplain, Thomas Tyeth, claviger (or warden), and Roger de Hugunde or Hogyndon, a brother in residence at Faxfleet, and Adam de Crake, claviger, at Temple Hirst.

On 10th January 1511, Richard Elynor of North Cave claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for a felony, but the register does not give any detail of his crime.

On 10th January 1537, Sir Francis Bigod, of Settrington, and John Hallam, of Cawkeld near Watton, met to discuss rekindling the Pilgrimage of Grace, which had ended in December with promises to restore the monasteries and hold a Parliament at York. They planned to seize Hull and Scarborough before they could be fortified.

On 10th January 1646, Stephen Thompson of Humbleton was fined £400 as the owner of Scarborough Castle and a Royalist (a ‘delinquent’) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament.

On 10th January 1761, Mrs Jane Delamoth died in Hull. Her memorial in St Mary’s Sculcoates may be the only memorial written in shorthand in the world. It says: ‘In the vault beneath this stone lies the body of Mrs Jane Delamoth, who departed this life 10thJanuary 1761. She was a poor sinner, but not wicked without holiness, departing from good works, and departed in the faith of the Catholic Church, in full assurance of eternal happiness, by the agony and bloody sweat, by the cross and passion, by the precious death and burial, by the glorious resurrection and ascension of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ’. see photo

On 10th January 1783, Rear Admiral John Storr died in Hilston. He is buried in Westminster Abbey. (b 18.8.1709) He commanded the Revenge at the Battle of Quiberon Bay 20.11.1759. His father Joseph built Storr’s Tower at Hilston in 1750. It served as a hospital for troops camped on the coast in 1794–5 and later as a cottage, but was disused in 1990. His memorial is in Hilston church.

On 10th January 1849, Cottingham land agent Thomas Spenceley reported that he had measured the distance from the Spa Inn, Aldbrough to the sea in 1832 and again in 1848 and the loss of land due to coastal erosion was 28 yards in that period. On 6.8.1832 the distance was 160 yards; on 11.8.1848 it was 132 yards, an average loss of 5ft 3” per year.

On 10th January 1952, Madame Clapham (Mrs Emily Clapham) died aged 96, the former Court Dressmaker of Kingston Square, Hull. Her fashions for high society made Hull ‘the rage’ according to Sir Osbert Sitwell.

On 10th January 1968, Hull trawler St Romanus left port and made radio contact with the owners that evening. A Mayday call was heard, but not passed on. The official enquiry concluded ship probably lost on 11thJanuary, reason unknown.

On 10th January 1968, Hull trawler Kingston Peridot of Hull left port and was not contacted until after 26 January. The enquiry concluded she probably capsized on 26th  or 27th January, due to extreme weather.

November 20th

On 20th November 1893, the steamship Amcott was wrecked off Aldbrough with the loss of all 15 hands; a rider went 7 miles to Hornsea to bring the lifeboat, but too late to save the crew. One man tried to swim to shore, but was drowned before locals could reach him with a life-buoy.

On 20th November 1940, Hull PC Charles Christopher Winterbottom died aged 45, fatally injured when his cycle collided with a car at night in the blackout.

On 20th November 1943, Rev George Bramwell Evens, aka Romany, died aged 59.  Methodist preacher, author and radio presenter, broadcasting on BBC from 1933 until 1943. (Born 1884 at 3 Argyll St, Hull to a romani mother)

 

'Romany'

November 7th

Gunpowder Plot memorial
Welwick

On 7th November 1605, Sir John Ferne, secretary to the Council in the North, sent confidential news to the Hull Mayor of the Gunpowder Plot, and orders to arrest Thomas Percy of Leconfield. An arrest warrant was issued the following day to the Bailiff, Chief Constable and constables of the county of Hull. However, Percy and the other conspirators were heading for Staffordshire.

On 7th November 1646, Sir Francis Cobbe of Ottringham was fined £72 as a Lieutenant-Colonel in the Royalist army (a delinquent) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament. He had been a member of King Charles’ Bodyguard.

On 7th November 1887, the crew of sailing ship Earl of Beaconsfield were rescued after the ship ran aground on sands off Aldbrough; the figurehead, representing Benjamin Disraeli, the Earl of Beaconsfield, can be seen in Hull Maritime Museum.

October 28th

 

 

charterhouse.JPGOn 28th October 1451, the Mayor and town of Hull and the Prior and Convent of the Charterhouse reached agreement on 8 areas of dispute between them, chiefly relating to ownership of land and streets between the town walls and the Charterhouse, including the Trippett and the northern part of Pole Street, the rent due for them, and garden fences of the Charterhouse encroaching on the public highway.

On 28th October 1510, William Sedyngton of Flambrough claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 28th October 1880, during a storm, the Saffron, Jabez, and Earl of Derby separately crashed into the piers at Withernsea and Hornsea, 2 at Withernsea and 1 at Hornsea; both piers were substantially damaged. The Hornsea pier had only opened 5 months before, and was completely demolished in 1897. The Withernsea pier had been open 2 years, and was to have several more ships crash into it before being demolished, apart from the 2 remaining towers.

On 28th October 1910, the Aldbrough Rocket Brigade rescued the crew of the trawler Castor of Grimsby, which ran aground on Aldbrough beach, whilst the Hornsea Lifeboat crew took an hour against high winds to row to the site. Later the Secretary of the Hornsea branch of the RNLI said that Hornsea did not have strong men like they had in Bridlington and it was the worst place on the coast to get a lifeboat.

August 23rd

On 23rd August 1326, Richard Furnewes, barber to the Archbishop of York, was appointed to keep the park at Bishop Burton and the deer, at a salary of 2d per day.

On 23rd August 1601, Lord Burley, Queen’s Lieutenant and President of the Council of the North, visited Hull. His visit was marked with a firework display in the Market Place. Tragically, the cannon misfired, and at least 4 died, and several others were injured.

On 23rd August 1619, a woman bonesetter from South Dalton attended Londesborough House to treat Earl Francis’s shoulder, dislocated in a fall while out hawking. She was paid £1 5s for the treatment, which included 2 visits. (A physician might charge £2 a visit).

On 23rd August 1653, Robert Acklam was fined £5 by Hull Trinity House for taking the ship Blessing from Hull to London and from there crossing to Holland without the correct licence.

On 23rd August 1830, 60 farm workers rioted in Burton Pidsea, armed with clubs, scythes and stones, and visited every farmhouse where there were known to be Irish labourers, aiming to drive them out of the neighbourhood. 6 of them attacked Irish men working in a field belonging to Mr Baxter. The Hull Packet reported on 10.9. 1830 that the 6 ringleaders had been arrested and would be tried at the next Quarter Sessions in Beverley.

On 23rd August 1886, former Hull Trinity House pupil John Lester, aged 20, was killed by a fall from aloft on the Schooner Welsh Belle travelling from Hull to Newfoundland.

On 23rd August 1934, the Yorkshire Post reported on a cliff collapse along a 100-yard stretch at Aldbrough, which resulted in thousands of tons of material falling onto the beach, destroying the boat slipway. No-one was hurt. photo shows more recent erosion at Ulrome.

 

erosion Ulrome

August 4th

On 4th August 1511, John Hessey, husbandman of Belby, nr Howden, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of William Smyth of Didyngham (anyone know where this is?)

On 4th August 1652, Keyingham manor court fined 18 villagers for allowing their geese and pigs into the fields outside the stipulated times.

On 4th August 1795, Hull residents rioted against inflationary food prices and shortages. Much corn was being taken by the army, (Napoleonic Wars) in a year of poor weather. A few windows broken.

On 4th August 1834, John Venn, was born in Drypool, son of the vicar. Left Hull at age 8. Fellow of the Royal Society, famous mathematician, who introduced the Venn diagram. Commemorated in Hull University by the Venn Building. (d 4.4.1923) and by Drypool Bridge.

On 4th August 1851, G. Hought of Hutton Cranswick was killed by lightning, as he sheltered under a tree during a thunderstorm. He left a wife and 2 children.

On 4th August 1884, all 11 Walgate brothers of Aldbrough formed one cricket team in a match held at Rise Hall; the Walgates won the match by 3 wickets.

On 4th August 1969, HM Queen Elizabeth opened Queen Elizabeth Dock, the last major dock to be opened in Hull, accompanied by HRH Duke of Edinburgh and Princess Anne.

 

Drypool Bridge