June 24th

On 24th June 1381, King Edward III issued a writ ordering rebel supporters of the Peasants’ Revolt to be arrested and punished.

On 24th June 1392, lightning struck Keyingham church and caught fire, and residents took ladders to douse the fire on the roof; a ladder holding 13 men broke, but no-one was injured, which was put down to a miracle of St Philip Ingleberd.

On 24th June 1643, Capt John Hotham,  having escaped from arrest, fled to Lincoln, planning to seize it for the King, and wrote to Parliament to say he could answer all charges against him. From Lincoln, he returned to his father in Hull.

On 24th June 1867, Charles Edward Smith, ship’s surgeon, aged 30, was presented with an illuminated testimonial, and a case of surgical instruments, in recognition of his gallant conduct on the whaler Diana of Hull, which had been trapped for months in ice and whose crew had suffered privations leading to scurvy.

On 24th June 1943, Mr T.R. Gale, of Estcourt Street, Hull, performed an act of gallantry during an air raid, for which he was later awarded the British Empire Medal. On the same night, Civil Defence volunteer Albert Henry Prissick of 15 Mersey Street, lost his wife and baby son, but carried on with the rescue of his neighbours. Hull Municipal Museum, Albion Street, was destroyed by fire.

On 24th June 1981, the Humber Bridge was opened to traffic; for 17 years it was the world’s longest single-span suspension bridge. On the same day, the Humber ferry service ended.

On 24th June 2011, marine artist Colin Verity died aged 87 in Market Weighton. Educated at Malet Lambert School, Hull and School of Architecture, Hull University. Flew Spitfires during WW2. Became principal architect, Hull City Council. Member RIBA, Royal Socy of Marine Artists, President Hornsea Art Society.  (b Darwen Lancs 7.3.1924)

 

Humber Bridge