February 19th

Pilgr Grace

On 19th February 1408, Henry Percy, 1stEarl of Northumberland, was killed in battle against King Henry IV, after supporting Edmund Mortimer’s claim to the throne. The Percies held lands across Yorkshire, the Lakes and Northumberland, but their main seat appeared to be Leconfield until the 16thC.

On 19th February 1499, William Fechet of Harpham claimed sanctuary at St Cuthbert’s church, Durham, for assaulting William Fox on 22ndOctober, striking him in several places with a sword; he assumed that Fox had died from his wounds, and fled.

On 19th February 1537, Sir Ralph Ellerker, the elder, chased Sir Francis Bigod and his men out of Beverley, and took 62 prisoners, who were taken to Hull. Bigod escaped. This appeared to be the end of the Pilgrimage of Grace in East Yorkshire.

On 19th February 1944, a Halifax bomber crashed 2m NNW of Hornsea shortly after take-off, killing all 7 crew. Photo -notice in Atwick church. Sadly, I was unable to find the memorial.

Atwick Halifax crash

December 27th

On 27th December 1442, John Shale, mariner, and John Roper, chaplain, conveyed to William Riplyngham, merchant, a tenement and garden in Le Pavement, Hull.

On 27th December 1804, the crew of Danish ship Familian was rescued when their ship ran aground on Stoney Binks, off Spurn Point, on a journey from Longsound to Hull.

On 27th December 1822, Richard Walker of Beverley was robbed and murdered at Leconfield by William Johnson, 23. Johnson was convicted and hanged at York Castle 24.3.1823, and his body delivered to surgeons for dissection.

spurn lighthouse.JPG

November 7th

Gunpowder Plot memorial
Welwick

On 7th November 1605, Sir John Ferne, secretary to the Council in the North, sent confidential news to the Hull Mayor of the Gunpowder Plot, and orders to arrest Thomas Percy of Leconfield. An arrest warrant was issued the following day to the Bailiff, Chief Constable and constables of the county of Hull. However, Percy and the other conspirators were heading for Staffordshire.

On 7th November 1646, Sir Francis Cobbe of Ottringham was fined £72 as a Lieutenant-Colonel in the Royalist army (a delinquent) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament. He had been a member of King Charles’ Bodyguard.

On 7th November 1887, the crew of sailing ship Earl of Beaconsfield were rescued after the ship ran aground on sands off Aldbrough; the figurehead, representing Benjamin Disraeli, the Earl of Beaconsfield, can be seen in Hull Maritime Museum.

September 29th

On 29th September 1541, King Henry VIII stayed overnight with the Earl of Northumberland at Leconfield.

On 29th September 1638, the Council in the North wrote to the East Riding Commissioner for Sewers at Hedon complaining of the ruinous condition of the banks of the Humber in Drypool.

On 29th September 1829, some postboys were watering the Archbishop of York’s horses at Bar Dyke, Beverley (next to North Bar) after a trip to Rise; one fell in and was saved from drowning by 2 young men. One of the horses dropped dead, whether from exertion or from drinking the dirty water, the Hull Advertiser did not say.

On 29th September 1947, interpreter Sergeant Wadey, and Sgt Cramer were both killed, together with 7 German prisoners of war, when the Army truck they were driving crashed through the railway crossing gates, and stopped on the track in the path of a train heading for Bridlington. 19 other POWs were injured. They were being transported from POW camp 250 at Thorpe Hall, Rudston.

b.agnes level crossing

September 10th

Leconfield Castle moat-7 28102017 200134

On 10th September 1292, King Edward I stayed at Market Weighton on his way to York, after returning from Scotland.

On 10th September 1541, Henry VIII and  his court set out from Leconfield (home of Henry Algernon Percy, 5thEarl of Northumberland) for Hull. photo shows site of Leconfield Castle.

On 10th September 1623, Hull and York corporations proposed a conference be held to resolve the difference which had arisen between the 2 towns.

August 22nd

On 22nd August, 1138, William le Gros, Earl of Albemarle and Lord of Holderness, was made Earl of York, in recognition of his prowess in the Battle of the Standard at Cowton Moor, Northallerton. The 4 standards of St John of Beverley, St Peter of York, St Cuthbert of Durham, and St Wilfred of Ripon, were used as a rallying point for the English against the Scots. The East Riding contingent included a Percy and a de Stuteville. (and see 20.8)

On 22nd August 1572, Thomas Percy, 7thEarl of Northumberland, was executed at York for treason, as leader of the Rising of the North. He was offered mercy if he renounced Catholicism, and refused.  Beatified by the Catholic church. (b 1528, probably in  Leconfield)

On 22nd August 1711, James Rand left £160 in his will for ‘the poor and needful of Preston’. Rands Estate in the village is named for him.

On 22nd August 1917, a bomb from a German Zeppelin destroyed the Primitive Methodist chapel, Baxtergate, Hedon.

On 22nd August 1918, Alfred Buchanan Cheetham of Bean Street, Hull, was killed when the SS Prunelle was torpedoed in the North Sea by a German U-boat. He took part in 3 Polar expeditions, and spent a total of 6 years in the Antarctic, with both Scott and Shackleton. Awarded the Silver Polar Medal clasp, he claimed to have crossed the Antarctic Circle 14 times. Cape Cheetham is named for him. (b 6.5.1867 Liverpool)

On 22nd August 1925, Robin Skelton died aged 72 in victoria, Canada. Poet, literary editor, professor and author of books on wicca. Born in Easington 12.10.1925

 

robin skelton

August 1st

On 1st August 1506, William Ryplay, labourer, of Leconfield, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 1st August 1639, Robert Skelton, 32, of Hull, was hanged at York Castle for forging a will belonging to Thomas Bell of Hull.

On 1st August 1648, Hull Recorder Francis Thorpe wrote to the Mayor concerning the shipment of pistols to the town, and about the case of Bacchus, a delinquent (i.e. a supporter of the Royalist cause in the Civil War).

On 1st August 1670, Mrs Mary Barnard of Barmston had been ordered to do work to the drain called Gallow Clow (on Myton Carr, near the road to Anlaby) on land which she owned, and had failed to carry it out; a jury under the Commissioner of Sewers gave notice of their intention to view the drain or creek.

On 1st August 1834, Richard Bethell MP laid the foundation stone for William Wilberforce’s statue on Monument Bridge, Hull, on the same day as the Slavery Abolition Act came into force.

On 1st August 1873, the Fisk Jubilee Singers arrived in Hull and visited the Wilberforce monument on the anniversary of the Abolition of Slavery Act. They performed several times, and were so popular they returned to Hull twice more before returning to the US August 1874. They were on a European tour, including singing for Queen Victoria, to raise money for the Fisk University for freed slaves. Several of the singers were born slaves.

 

Wilberforce memorial plinth