12th May

On 12th May 1585, Dr Thomas Vavasour died of diseas in Hull Castle after being imprisoned in damp and overcrowded conditions with the whole of his household for many years. A physician and scholar, he was a prominent Catholic, was excommunicated and arrested. He was buried in Drypool churchyard, which stood within the garrison walls of Hull.

On 12th May 1698, Hull grassman Hugh Stringer was given a contract by the town council to cart away rubbish, clean the streets, and ensure that residents kept the street clean in front of their house.

On 12th May 1855, Sir (William) Alfred Gelder, FRS, FRIBA was born in North Cave. As  an architect, was involved in clearing Hull’s Victorian slums and reconstructing the city, in partnership with City Architect Joseph Hirst. Liberal, Mayor of Hull 1899-1903, later MP for Brigg and Hull alderman. Received the freedom of the city 1930. Died 26.8.41.

On 12th May 1859, Paull fisherman Thomas Marritt drowned whilst fishing in Whitebooth Roads, in the Humber. His body was found in the river between Hessle and Hull in June.

On 12th May 1874, Grace (8) and Lucy (7) Cuthbert of Easington died when their clothing became trapped in the machinery of the family mill, where they were playing.

On 12th May 1903, the Prince and Princess of Wales (later George V & Queen Mary) unveiled a statue to Queen Victoria in Hull; their escort was the first task of the newly created East Riding of Yorkshire Imperial Yeomanry.

On 12th May 1915, an anonymous person wrote a letter addressed to George, at German Pork Shop, Waterworks Street, Hull, warning him that his shop was to be ‘broken up’ because of anti-German feelings as a result of the sinking of the Lusitania. Hohenrein’s Pork Butchers was attacked by a mob.

On 12th May 1945, retired Hull City Architect Joseph Hirst died aged 81 in Selby. Was responsible, with Mayor Alfred Gelder, for the transformation of Hull in the late 19thC, with the creation of Victoria Square, City Hall, and Alfred Gelder St. His designs include the Market Hall, Beverley Road Baths, Carnegie Library, Pickering Almshouses, Castle Hill Hospital. He was involved in planning new council estates in the 1920s. Wrote “The Blockhouses of Hull’ and ‘Armorial Bearings of KuH’. (b24.5.1863 South Milford) Hirst appears to have no memorial in Hull.

On 12th May 2013, Professor George William Gray, CBE, died aged 86. He moved to Hull in 1946 and worked as a laboratory demonstrator at Hull University. Went on to lead the research which resulted in LCD technology. Received many awards, including Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and Kyoto International Gold Medallist. He is commemorated in the George Gray Room in Hull History Centre.

11th May

 

On 11th May 1481, Stamford shoemaker John Woodcok claimed sanctuary at St John’s church, Beverley, for the death of William de Tee, mercer of Stamford, on 30th March.

On 11th May 1812, HMS Anson, a 74-gun naval ship of the line, was launched at Paull by Steemson of Hull. In 1844 she carried 499 male convicts to Hobart, Tasmania, the largest number of convicts carried by a single ship. Was refitted as a prison for female convicts and broken up in 1851.

On 11th May 1975, Hull-born artist and architect Allanson Hick died aged 76 in Hornsea. From a maritime family, his career as an architect allowed time for artwork; a member Society of Graphic Artists, founder member of Royal Society of Marine Artists, Fellow of Royal Inst British Architects, President of York & EYorks Architectural Society. Many of his architectural commissions no longer survive, but he designed Dundee Chambers, Princes Dock Side. Several of his works were purchased by the Ferens, and he exhibited at the Royal Academy. He has no Wikipedia entry. (born 19.6.1898 89 Walton St, Hull)

April 18th

On 18th April 1801, Hull Trinity House gave financial support to 7 mariners who had returned home after being taken prisoner in the war against the French.

On 18th April 1864, Hull Mayor John Lumsden called a public meeting in Hull Town Hall, Lowgate. The topic was a petition to invite the Italian  nationalist General Garibaldi to Hull. He was in England, but unable to come to Hull, and returned to fight in Italy.

On 18th April 1911, Francis Frederick Johnson, was born in Bridlington, where he lived all his life. An architect, his early work was mostly local, and he did much restoration work on country houses. His work was increasingly recognised nationally and internationally, and he worked up to his death aged 84. He was awarded the CBE, for work including St Margaret’s Hilston; St Michael & All Angels, Orchard Park; Winestead Rectory restoration; Cottingham Rectory. Many of the buildings he designed were given listed status in 2017. He is buried at Reighton with his life partner, Edward Ingram, local historian.  (d 29.9.1995) photo shows Hilston church

On 18th April 1932, the Thorpe Enquiry into land deals on Hull Council reported its findings that Sir Digby Willoughby (who had committed suicide the month before), Alderman Francis Finn, and builder Robert Tarran, were involved in corrupt land deals.

hilston church & tower.JPG

April 14th

On 14th April 1511, Walter Rugbe of Paull, a cooper, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of mariner Anthony Dowre of Boulogne.

On 14th April 1524, Sir Robert Constable of Flamborough, with 100 men, attacked the Rokebys’ manor house in Bishop Burton and abducted Ann Cresacre in a complex dispute over land and marriage agreements. Ann was 12 yearsold and an orphan. The case was heard in the Star Chamber. Ann eventually married the son of Sir Thomas More.  A descendant was the City Architect of Hull, Joseph Hirst. photo shows Holbein’s study for his picture of the More family – Ann is standing, rear.

On 14th April 1571, William Strickland of Boynton, MP, a leading Puritan, presented a Bill  to Parliament to reform the prayer book, including abolishing confirmation and the wearing of priests’ vestments.

On 14th April 1702, Jeremiah Northend was buried, aged 78 in Rowley. Aged 14, he had emigrated to Massachusetts with his Uncle Robert and cousin Ezekiel, with the dissenting community led by Rev Ezekiel Rogers, but returned home after about 9 years. Lived in Little Weighton. (b 26.9.1624).

Study_More_familyHans_Holbein

April 12th

On 12th April 627AD, King Edwin of Northumbria convened his Great Council at  Londesborough and agreed to adopt Christianity; King Edwin’s high priest Coifi destroyed the pagan temple at Goodmanham.

On 12th April 1748, William Kent (orig Cant) died aged 63 . This Bridlington-born architect and polymath, originator of the English style of landscape gardening, also introduced the Palladian style of architecture to England.  His buildings include Treasury Buildings and Horseguards, both in Whitehall, and Holkham Hall. (bapt 1.1.1686) photo shows his house in Bridlington old town

On 12th April 1855, John Enderby Jackson’s  ‘The Withernsea Quadrilles’ were played for the first time at a ball to celebrate the opening of  Withernsea’s first hotel, Queens Hotel, for visitors travelling on the new Hull to Withernsea rail line. Before the railway opened the previous year, the village population was tiny (108 in 1801), with 1 inn, and farming was the main occupation.

William Kent's house

March 27th

On 27th March 1349, an earthquake was recorded at Meaux and in Beverley, as in much of Eastern England. The monks were at prayer, and had reached the 2ndverse of Psalm 60 – ‘Thou hast made the earth to tremble; Thou hast broken it’.

On 27th March 1570, Thomas Bishop of Pocklington was tried at York Castle, and hanged, drawn and quartered for his part in the Northern Catholic rebellion against Queen Elizabeth. Anthony Langdale of Sancton escaped to Rome, and others may have fled to exile in Paris.

On 27th March 1575, Frederick Gottfried, aged 37, of Hull, was convicted of coining guineas and hanged in York.

On 27th March 1634, Mr Vavasour of Hesslewood (we don’t know if this was Thomas, 1stbaronet, Walter, 2ndbart, or another) was riding past Micklegate Bar in York when he saw moving earth, and helped convicted felon John Bartendale out of his grave. Bartendale was a travelling musician, who had been tried, hanged and buried. He was returned to prison, and at the next Assizes was given a full pardon.

On 27th March 1679, Mary Trot the daughter of Angel Trot died in infancy in Ellerker, and was buried, even though her father was a pauper, in a woollen shroud, following an Act passed to protect the woollen trade.

On 27th March 1615, Marmaduke Stutt of South Frodingham was buried in Winestead Lane after drowning whilst walking along the road.

On 27th March 1799, George Pycock died in Hull aged 50. He was the principal architect and builder in Hull at the time. He built Mytongate jail, the Infirmary, Prospect St, and St Giles Church, Marfleet. His only surviving building is the Neptune Inn, Whitefriargate.  (b1749)

Neptune Inn

March 2nd

 

Flambro 'Danish tower'

On 2nd March 1406, James, Duke of Rothesay, son of Robert III of Scotland, was on his way to sanctuary in France, when he was captured by pirates, held in the Danish Tower in Flamborough for a time, then handed over to English King Henry IV. photo shows the Danish Tower

On 2nd March 1829, Rev John Scott, vicar of St Mary’s Lowgate, with many others, spoke at a public meeting in Hull Market Place to consider petitioning Parliament against Catholic Emancipation. Daniel Sykes, Whig MP for Hull, did not believe these vocal agitators were representative of the majority in Hull.

On 2nd March 1905, Cuthbert Brodrick died in Jersey aged 83. Nationally renowned architect of Leeds Town Hall, Scarborough’s Grand Hotel, Hull Town Hall (demolished 1912) and Hull’ s Royal Institution. (b Hull 1.12.1821)