April 28th

On 28th April 1489, Henry Percy, 4thEarl of Northumberland, was lynched at Cocklodge near Thirsk by a rioting mob protesting against high taxes, during the Yorkshire Rebellion. He was buried in a newly built chapel in Beverley Minster.

On 28th April 1825, a bull sperm whale washed up at Tunstall, and was dissected on the beach by Dr James Alderson, before being articulated by Edward Wallis, and put on display to the public at Burton Constable Hall. Herman Melville saw the whale and referred to it in his novel “Moby Dick’. The remains of the skeleton are still on show.

On 28th April 1876, Hull sculptor Thomas Earle died aged 66. A member of the Earle family of stonemasons and later shipbuilders, Thomas made a successful career in London. His works in Hull include the statue of Dr John Alderson (Hull Royal Infirmary), Oceanus (Trinity House), Queen Victoria (Pearson Park), Thomas Ferres (Hull Minster – see below) and Edward I (Guildhall). Awarded Royal Academy Gold Medal 1851.

Thos Ferres by Thos Earle

February 19th

Pilgr Grace

On 19th February 1408, Henry Percy, 1stEarl of Northumberland, was killed in battle against King Henry IV, after supporting Edmund Mortimer’s claim to the throne. The Percies held lands across Yorkshire, the Lakes and Northumberland, but their main seat appeared to be Leconfield until the 16thC.

On 19th February 1499, William Fechet of Harpham claimed sanctuary at St Cuthbert’s church, Durham, for assaulting William Fox on 22ndOctober, striking him in several places with a sword; he assumed that Fox had died from his wounds, and fled.

On 19th February 1537, Sir Ralph Ellerker, the elder, chased Sir Francis Bigod and his men out of Beverley, and took 62 prisoners, who were taken to Hull. Bigod escaped. This appeared to be the end of the Pilgrimage of Grace in East Yorkshire.

On 19th February 1944, a Halifax bomber crashed 2m NNW of Hornsea shortly after take-off, killing all 7 crew. Photo -notice in Atwick church. Sadly, I was unable to find the memorial.

Atwick Halifax crash

December 19th

Dame Ann Percy (Percehay)

On 19th December 1511, Ann Percy died in Hessle, the wife of Sir Henry Percy (or Percehay) and mother of 17 children. Although she is not of the Northumberland Percies, the Duke of Northumberland in 1862 arranged for a transcription of the original brass in Hessle Church, presumably under the assumption that she was of his line.

On 19th December 1656, the second of 2 boy twins of Philip Ellerker died at Ellerker, 2 days after the death of the first, at the age of 3 days.

On 19th December 1939, it was reported that of the 1,774 children evacuated from Hull  in September and October, 900 had returned home, during the ‘phoney war’.

 

November 8th

 

 

Gunpowder Plot memorial
Welwick

On 8th November 1481, Thomas Nevyll, yeoman of Skirlaugh, sought sanctuary in Durham Cathedral for killing John Hewlins of Rise on 1stNovember.

On 8th November 1500, William Thorpp of Welwick, John Dorand and a man named Nicholas were in Winestead when their dog entered the park; they asked the parkers to return the dog, but they refused, and were abusive. Nicholas shot one of the parkers named March, in the neck with an arrow; he died about 10 days later. Thorpp travelled to Durham, where on 10.12 he claimed sanctuary, fearing he would be indicted as an accessory to murder.

On 8th November 1605, Jack and Kit Wright of Welwick, and brother-in-law Thomas Percy were fatally wounded at Holbeche House, Staffordshire, by the posse of 200 men led by the Sheriff of Warwick, Sir Richard Walsh. 9 of the 13 Gunpowder Plotters were at Holbeche, and they all died there; the other 4 were all executed.

On 8th November 1637, the Mayor of Hull petitioned the Privy Council that 1) the town was so poor as a result of the recent plague that it be let off the requirement to provide 2 warships for the Navy; 2) that the county’s funds help to support Hull’s poor and; 3) that Hull’s merchants be allowed to sell their goods elsewhere in the country again, now that the town was free of the plague. It was estimated that 2,000 people died in Hull, and perhaps as many left town.

November 7th

Gunpowder Plot memorial
Welwick

On 7th November 1605, Sir John Ferne, secretary to the Council in the North, sent confidential news to the Hull Mayor of the Gunpowder Plot, and orders to arrest Thomas Percy of Leconfield. An arrest warrant was issued the following day to the Bailiff, Chief Constable and constables of the county of Hull. However, Percy and the other conspirators were heading for Staffordshire.

On 7th November 1646, Sir Francis Cobbe of Ottringham was fined £72 as a Lieutenant-Colonel in the Royalist army (a delinquent) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament. He had been a member of King Charles’ Bodyguard.

On 7th November 1887, the crew of sailing ship Earl of Beaconsfield were rescued after the ship ran aground on sands off Aldbrough; the figurehead, representing Benjamin Disraeli, the Earl of Beaconsfield, can be seen in Hull Maritime Museum.

November 3rd

On 3rd November 1451, Richard Anson was enrolled in post as Hull Collector of Customs, joining existing staff Richard Bille (Collector) and Richard Alanson (Controller).

On 3rd November 1947, George Cornelius (Con) O’Kelly died aged 61. He achieved gold for Great Britain in the 1908 Olympics in men’s freestyle wrestling. 12,000 people turned out to meet him when he returned to Hull.  His son, Con jnr, competed in the 1924 Olympic heavyweight boxing.

On 3rd November 1975, trawler owners ceased to use St Andrew’s Dock, Hull, which was closed to shipping after the collapse of Hull’s fishing industry.

St Andrews Dock memorial
Zebedee’s Yard

September 10th

Leconfield Castle moat-7 28102017 200134

On 10th September 1292, King Edward I stayed at Market Weighton on his way to York, after returning from Scotland.

On 10th September 1541, Henry VIII and  his court set out from Leconfield (home of Henry Algernon Percy, 5thEarl of Northumberland) for Hull. photo shows site of Leconfield Castle.

On 10th September 1623, Hull and York corporations proposed a conference be held to resolve the difference which had arisen between the 2 towns.