April 30th

Edmund delaPole

On 30th April 1513, Edmund de la Pole, 3rdDuke of Suffolk, 6thEarl of Suffolk, and his brother John were executed by Henry VIII. Edmund was the leading Yorkist claimant to the throne; he had sought help from the Holy Roman Emperor, who handed him over to Henry.

On 30th April 1584, Walter Peck and others were fined 2s8d for buying 200 fish in the Humber before it was landed in Hull. Robert Jackson and others were fined on the same day for the same offence, a total of 53s 4d.

On 30th April 1649, Henry Cave, 39 and William Cropper, 40, both of Hull, were executed outside Walmgate Bar, York, with 12 other ‘rebels’ from the North and West Ridings.

On 30th April 1859, Joseph Hoare was elected MP for Hull, but the election was declared void due to bribery, and a by-election was held in August. Hoare’s agent employed poor voters as runners and messengers at 3s 6d a day.

On 30th April 1877, brick- and tile-makers in the Newport area complained about the state of the Market Weighton Canal, which had carried millions of bricks in the 1820s, and was now too low for their barges. It took 4 years for any real action to be taken, due to denial of responsibility by the canal trustees, the local authority, and the North Eastern Railway. Commercial navigation on the canal did not die out until 1958.

 

January 19th

 

Pilgr Grace

On 19th January 1537, Sir Francis Bigod was attacked by Ellerker’s men in Beverley, and most of his men were captured. After failing to capture Scarborough, he had gathered more followers at Bainton, but heard that John Hallam had failed to capture Hull. Bigod escaped to the north, and was eventually captured in March. Both Bigod and Hallam were executed.

On 19th January 1684, Sir Robert Hilyard, knight & Baron of Patrington, gave his son Capt Robert Hilyard ‘2 whole pues or closets, which were positioned in the South Transept’.

On 19th January 1970, Alan Plater oversaw the first production at the new theatre in Spring Street of his own play ‘Don’t Build a Bridge, Drain the River’, with music by Mike Chapman and Mike Waterson. The Humberside Arts Centre later became Humberside Theatre, and then Hull Truck Theatre. see photo

On 19th January 1979, William Rodgers, Secretary of State for Transport, reported in the House of Commons that as the result of an industrial dispute in the road haulage industry, there was no movement of grain or animal feed out of Hull docks. The importance of Hull was stressed, as other parts of the country depended on it to deliver goods.

On 19th January 2014, the Environment Agency closed Sutton Lock on the River Derwent to navigation due to safety concerns. The lock had been reconstructed in 1972 to enable pleasure craft to travel up to Stamford Bridge and give access to the Pocklington Canal. There seemed to be uncertainty as to who owned the gates and equipment.

Spring St theatre

December 22nd

On 22nd December 1530, Beverley draper William Leryfax wrote his will, and appointed as guardians for his son Robert the priors of Watton Abbey and Meaux Abbey. In 1539, both abbeys were dissolved, and the subprior of Watton had been hanged in chains in 1537 for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace.

On 22nd December 1580, the Hull Mayor and aldermen set the price of ale at a penny for a quart and a pint outsales, and a penny a quart and a gill in the alehouse.

On 22nd December 1802, George Knowsley of Cottingham Grange held a meeting at the Duke of Cumberland, Cottingham, to propose the building of a canal from Cottingham to Hull; the aim was to reduce transport costs and establish a local grain market. The Napoleonic Wars caused the project to be shelved, and it was never revived.

November 26th

On 26th November 1319, Geoffrey Fitz Hugh and John de Wetewang conveyed property in Lyle Street (Mytongate), Hull,  to Hugh and Ellen Le Taverner.

On 26th November 1525, Richard Haton, gentleman, from Hayton, claimed sanctuary in St Mary’s Church, Hertford, and confessed to the coroner  that in October he had broken into a parish church in Essex and stolen a silver chalice; and in January he had burgled a house in Bucks and stolen jewellery and money. He abjured, i.e. renounced his country, and left through the port of Southampton.

On 26th November 1597, Sir Francis Barrington, Lord of the Manor of Cottingham (and uncle by marriage of Oliver Cromwell) wrote objecting to Hull Corporation’s drainage plan to move surplus water through his clough at Cottingham, which he said would risk flooding in the area.

On 26th November 1831, Joseph Robinson Pease, JP, spent his third consecutive day swearing in Special Constables to deal with anticipated riots; various sources say between 800 and 2,000 were sworn. James Acland had formed the Hull Political Union, and held meetings critical of the Hull Corporation, and said the aldermen were of out of touch and did not live in the town.

On 26th November 1847, Pocklington Canal Company agreed, at the Feathers Hotel, Pocklington, to sell the canal to the York & North Midland Railway, which also purchased the Market Weighton and Leven Canals. The canal had never been a financial success, and the railway company subsequently raised canal tolls so as to drive freight traffic onto the trains.

Pocklington canal
Melbourne lock

October 5th

On 5th October 1643, Sir John Meldrum was sent by Parliament with troops and supplies to help in the defence of Hull from attack by the Royalists.

On 5th October 1801, the residents and business people of Pocklington resolved, at a meeting in the Black Bull Inn, to create a canal to serve the town. The war with the French may have delayed matters, as it was 14 years before a Bill was presented to Parliament and passed. photo shows the canal today

On 5th October 1931, Matthew Stirling died, aged 74 in Hull. Mechanical engineer, designer of locomotives for Hull & Barnsley Railway, many of his designs including his powerful H&BR Class A(LNER Class Q10) 0-8-0freight locomotives were heavily used during World War I. (Born 27.11.1856, Kilmarnock)

On 5th October 1945, Frederick Bryan, 50, 3rd hand,  was lost with 8 shipmates when Hull trawler Grenada struck a mine (at 51 11N 8 10W).

Pocklington canal

July 26th

On 26th July 1826, the Aire & Calder Navigation Company officially opened the new canal at Goole, locks for ships and barges, dock, and canal basin linking Goole to the west. A new town was built around the small hamlet of Goole (population in 1822: 450).

On 26th July 1845, Capt Dannatt and crew of Hull whaler Prince of Wales came across Sir John Franklin and his expedition to find the North West Passage, in Lancaster Sound, in the Arctic, and invited him and his officers on board. This was the last known sighting of the expedition.

On 26th July 1850, Hull Advertiser printed a report of the deaths by drowning during a riot of 4 Irish navvies (Patrick Langthon, John Dowling, Barney M’Jay and Thomas Twomey) working on the embankment of Sunk Island.

On 26th July 1986, 8 rail passengers and 1 person travelling in a van died when the van was struck by the 9.33 Bridlington to Hull train at Lockington level crossing, and the train was derailed. 51 people were injured, 10 of them seriously. There is a memorial to those who died in Driffield Memorial Garden.

 

lockington crash memorial

June 13th

On 13th June 1774, the Hedon Haven Commissioners held their first meeting to create a canal between Hedon and the Humber, so that goods could reach Hedon at all times of the tide. The 44 Commissioners (including 3 knights, 4 clerics, and merchants such as Samuel Standidge, Benjamin Blaydes and Henry Maister) had powers of compulsory purchase of land and to prosecute anyone who obstructed navigation. The canal was opened in December 1775.

On 13th June 1893, William Maclagan, Archbishop of York, visited Spurn in a small boat, saw the lifeboat station, school and lighthouse, and agreed to provide weekly religious services at Spurn. He then walked 31/2 miles to Kilnsea before continuing to Patrington by carriage.

On 13th June 1943, Withernsea Central School teacher Miss Longdon r.eported in the school log that incendiary bombs fell on the school, burnt out Classroom 8 and caused ‘holes in the hall and on the platform’. Some classes had to be accommodated in the Methodist Chapel.

Hedon Haven