July 7th

charabanc

On 7th July 1626, the Council in the North ordered Hull Corporation to fortify the town against threat from the Spanish.

On 7th July 1643, the Mayor and Aldermen of Hull  wrote to William Lenthall, Speaker of the House of Commons, to say that after suffering the tyrannical government of the town by Sir John Hotham,  (arrested the week before) they wished to have Lord Ferdinando Fairfax remain in the town as governor.

On 7th July 1788, George Wether(h)ill, butcher, of Hull, aged 80, died aged 80, killed by a bull’s leg. He is buried in Preston.

On 7th July 1928, the staff of Woolworths Ltd (Hull branch) went on their staff outing to Aldbrough by Binnington’s saloon buses. I hope someone had cut steps to the beach. (see yesterday’s item).

 

July 5th

On 5th July 1532, Henry VIII’s charter was read out in Hull Market Place, and prohibited anyone but Hull burgesses from conducting business in the port; the corporation paid £31 19s4d to obtain the charter, part of which was paid in the form of a sturgeon for Thomas Cromwell.

On 5th July 1657, a major fire in Hedon starting at 1 a.m. resulted in the loss of 42 houses, and others damaged. In August, the Mayor petitioned Parliament for permission to hold a collection to raise money; £4,000 was raised.

On 5th July 1776, John Wesley paid a visit to Howden and preached to a large congregation during a thunderstorm near Station Road, Howden. Wesley’s picture below

On 5th July 1811, Bridlington Collector of Customs Benjamin Milne discovered a tidal spring near the quay, now commemorated by a stone inscription.

On 5th July 1899, Hull Alderman Larard took the controls of the city’s first municipal electric tram (Siemens Bros & Co provided the electrical equipment). A spectator hoping for a good view, climbed on the roof of the public lavatories and fell through.

On 5th July 1930, the annual King’s Cup Air Race took place on this date, and planes had to follow a route of around 800 miles. Hull Aerodrome was a main control station on the route. Tickets were sold for 1s and 2s6d. The winner was Miss Winifred Brown in an Avro Avian III. (N.B. Hull Aerodrome is actually in Preston South.)

 

john wesley

July 1st

On 1st July 1643, cannoneer John Stevenson was buried in St Mary’s Beverley, having died in the town in a ‘great scrimmage’ in the Civil War (possibly the day before).

On 1st July 1801, Hull Subscription Mill Ltd opened to provide cheap flour to the poor of Hull, 3 years or so after the opening of Hull Anti-Mill, one of the first co-operatives in the country.

On 1st July 1830, the Hull whaler Eagle had been stuck in the ice of Baffin Bay for 5 days.   With the help of 200 men from nearby ships, Captain Matthew Wright and crew, were finally able to repair the keel and heave the ship upright again.

On 1st July 1903, Amy Johnson was born in St George’s Road, Hull. She went on to become the first woman to fly solo to Australia, and to break many aviation records. (d5.1.1941)

On 1st July 1918, Hull coroner Colonel Alfred Thorney held inquests on 2 early cases in the flu epidemic: Kate Denman, aged 11, daughter of a labourer of Hodgson Street, and Elsie Barton, aged 9, daughter of a soldier, of Arthur’s Terrace Courtney Street. Both died within 24 hours of being taken ill, of influenza followed by pneumonia.

On 1st July 1940, the first-ever daylight air-raid on the British mainland attacked Saltend oil terminal.  Between 16.40 and 17.00, bombs caused a 2,500-ton tank of oil to explode, and threatened to spread to other tanks. For preventing even greater damage, the following were all awarded the George Medal: Clifford Turner, leading fireman; William Sigsworth, Manager, Anglo-American Oil Co Ltd; George Samuel Sewell, engineer, Shell-Mex & BP Ltd; Jack Owen, fireman; George Archibald Howe, Manager, Shell-Mex & BP Ltd. No loss of life.

On 1st July 1976, Withernsea Lighthouse ceased operating, after 82 years, having been superseded by modern navigational aids. It is now open to the public as a museum to Kay Kendall, to local history and the lifeboat service.Withernsea

June 30th

On 30th June 1493, William Hall of Hull claimed sanctuary in the church of St John, Beverley, for the death of Thomas Harwed, a glover, also of Hull.

On 30th June 1643, Nicholas Pearson, Parish clerk, a Puritan, reported on a ‘great scrimmage’ in the town, the day before. ‘God gave us the victory’ meaning that Parliament won. 13 Royalists were buried the same day.

On the same day in Hull, the Committee of Defence ordered that 8 men guard Captain  Hotham to prevent his escape. His father, Sir John, was kept in the Hercules in the Humber before both were taken to the Tower of London.

On 30th June 1945, Hull Aldermen Hewitt and Stark acted as driver and conductor on the last ever Hull tram, illuminated with 800 fairy lights, and watched by up to 50,000 people. Trams had operated since 1899.

On 30th June 1999, Hull’s Lord Mayor Brian Petch presided at a ceremony to note the renovation and restoration of the gates of the former RAF station in Sutton, installed at the Gillshill Road entrance to East Park.

eastparkgates1

June 26th

On 26th June 1793, Captain William Hammond died aged 65 in Kirk Ella. Hull sea captain, shipowner and merchant, supporter of abolition, Chairman of Hull Dock Company, Warden of Trinity House, and diplomat. (He and David Hartley MP met Benjamin Franklin and John Adams in Paris on a possible spying mission) Buried in Welton. (b 1727 York). Photo shows a door in the Maritime Museum, former Dock Offices.

On 26th June 1854, at an event to celebrate the opening of the Hull-Withernsea railway line, 500 guests travelled from Hull on the first ever train (which was 20 minutes late, due to late arrival of guests) and part of the lunch marquee collapsed; there were no injuries. Joseph Robinson Pease in his diary recorded heavy showers and high winds threatened to tear the marquee to pieces, but that it subsided and all passed off well.

On 26th June 1920, the National Federation of Women Workers called its Hull laundry worker members out on strike, as they were paid less than in other towns. Hull Trades Council supported the strike and organised a parade on 17 July. Strike breakers were reported being smuggled in to work in laundry baskets.

Hull Dock Co

June 24th

On 24th June 1381, King Edward III issued a writ ordering rebel supporters of the Peasants’ Revolt to be arrested and punished.

On 24th June 1392, lightning struck Keyingham church and caught fire, and residents took ladders to douse the fire on the roof; a ladder holding 13 men broke, but no-one was injured, which was put down to a miracle of St Philip Ingleberd.

On 24th June 1643, Capt John Hotham,  having escaped from arrest, fled to Lincoln, planning to seize it for the King, and wrote to Parliament to say he could answer all charges against him. From Lincoln, he returned to his father in Hull.

On 24th June 1867, Charles Edward Smith, ship’s surgeon, aged 30, was presented with an illuminated testimonial, and a case of surgical instruments, in recognition of his gallant conduct on the whaler Diana of Hull, which had been trapped for months in ice and whose crew had suffered privations leading to scurvy.

On 24th June 1943, Mr T.R. Gale, of Estcourt Street, Hull, performed an act of gallantry during an air raid, for which he was later awarded the British Empire Medal. On the same night, Civil Defence volunteer Albert Henry Prissick of 15 Mersey Street, lost his wife and baby son, but carried on with the rescue of his neighbours. Hull Municipal Museum, Albion Street, was destroyed by fire.

On 24th June 1981, the Humber Bridge was opened to traffic; for 17 years it was the world’s longest single-span suspension bridge. On the same day, the Humber ferry service ended.

On 24th June 2011, marine artist Colin Verity died aged 87 in Market Weighton. Educated at Malet Lambert School, Hull and School of Architecture, Hull University. Flew Spitfires during WW2. Became principal architect, Hull City Council. Member RIBA, Royal Socy of Marine Artists, President Hornsea Art Society.  (b Darwen Lancs 7.3.1924)

 

Humber Bridge

 

June 19th

On 19th June 1256, the Meaux Abbey chronicler reported losing men and oxen at Orwithfleet, south of Patrington. A major flood of the Humber reached as far north as Cottingham, with many lives lost, livestock and fisheries devastated, and land washed into the river.

On 19th June 1607, Thomas Wincop, Master of Hull Charterhouse, bought, with Hull Mayor George Almond and other trustees, land in Haltemprice Wood abutting on the common fields of Willerby, to support the running costs; the Charterhouse already owned substantial property in and around Hull. photo shows Wincop’s memorial in Hull Minster.

On 19th June 1837, Hull Steam Packet Company launched the paddle steamer Victoria at Medley’s shipyard, Hull; she was considered state of the art. A boiler explosion in 1838 killed 5 crew; there was a second explosion the same year; she ran onto rocks in 1852 and was wrecked, with 8 people killed.

On the same day, Rev Joseph Coltman died in Beverley at the age of 60. He was known for his support of local charities, of the emancipation of Catholics, and of the abolition of slavery. Born in Hull, Coltman Street was named for him, as was Beverley’s Coltman Avenue. At 37 stone 8lbs, he was reputed to be the heaviest man in England, and his death may have been caused by his weight. He employed a manservant to turn him in bed, but he fell asleep and Coltman suffocated in his sleep.

On 19th June 1887, to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Jubilee, a state service was held in Holy Trinity church, Hull, the new Market Hall was opened, as was East Park, and there were festivities in all the city’s wards.

On 19th June 1920, Harry Wilkinson of  Lower Union Street, Hull, was seriously injured by 3 gunshots.  He was part of a mob of white people who attacked and damaged several boarding houses where black seamen lived. Tom Toby, a West African fireman, was charged with wounding, but no white people were arrested. Toby’s plea of self defence was accepted, and he was found not guilty. During the same rioting, Murrell Piggott, faced with a 200-strong crowd, had also fired, but his plea of self defence was not accepted, and he was sentenced to 9 months’ hard labour for unlawful wounding.

On 19th June 1940, the East Hull, docks, suburbs, and River Hull corridor experienced the first night-time raid of World War 2.

 

Thomas Whincopp memorial

June 13th

On 13th June 1774, the Hedon Haven Commissioners held their first meeting to create a canal between Hedon and the Humber, so that goods could reach Hedon at all times of the tide. The 44 Commissioners (including 3 knights, 4 clerics, and merchants such as Samuel Standidge, Benjamin Blaydes and Henry Maister) had powers of compulsory purchase of land and to prosecute anyone who obstructed navigation. The canal was opened in December 1775.

On 13th June 1893, William Maclagan, Archbishop of York, visited Spurn in a small boat, saw the lifeboat station, school and lighthouse, and agreed to provide weekly religious services at Spurn. He then walked 31/2 miles to Kilnsea before continuing to Patrington by carriage.

On 13th June 1943, Withernsea Central School teacher Miss Longdon r.eported in the school log that incendiary bombs fell on the school, burnt out Classroom 8 and caused ‘holes in the hall and on the platform’. Some classes had to be accommodated in the Methodist Chapel.

Hedon Haven

June 7th

On 7th June 1614, Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, of Londesborough House, paid for the apprenticeship of his scullery-maid Grace. He trained in London as a barber-surgeon for 7 years, and the Earl continued to support him when he had to transfer employers, as his first employer killed a man (perhaps in the course of treatment).

On 7th June 1672, the residents of Sister-Kirks (Owthorne and Withernsea) reported hearing the sound of the naval battle of Solebay, off the coast of Suffolk. A fleet of 75 Dutch ships surprised a fleet of 93 Anglo-French ships at anchor.

On 7th June 1796, Sir Henry Etherington laid the foundation stone of Hull Anti-Mill, to provide cheaper flour. An early co-operative, it was funded by subscription by poor residents finding the price of flour beyond their reach.

On 7th June 1837, the Union steam packet was in the Humber basin, Hull, Preparing to cross the Humber, when it exploded. 3 other ferries were next to it; 23 people died. The engineer was later charged, but not convicted.

On 7th June 1915, Vere Campey Marshall made a statement to police, stating that he witnessed a 1,000 strong crowd outside the premises of Kress and Wagner, 163/5 Spring Bank, throwing stones, and a girl using a hammer to break a window. Police and military were sent to guard the premises. Anti-German feeling was strong during WW1.

June 1st

On 1st June 1787, William Wilberforce asked the King to make a Royal Proclamation for the Encouragement of Piety and Virtue. Concerned at the large number of death sentences being carried out, he reasoned that those punished for small crimes, such as swearing, would be less likely to commit serious crimes, such as murder. The Society for the Reformation of Manners was established in Hull as a result.

On 1st June 1798, William Wickham, Superintendent of Aliens, wrote advising on the tightening of the Aliens Act, with particular relation to Italian pedlars landing at Hull.

On 1st June 1820, Rev Arthur Strickland and 6 other gentlemen adopted the rules of the Bridlington Cricket Club; cricket was clearly a game for the gentry, as subscriptions were 10s6d. Visitors and occasional residents could be invited to play for the summer. the pitch was in the field between Bessingby and the mill.

On 1st June 1829, Hull’s Junction Dock opened, completing the line of docks connecting the Hull and the Humber, along the line of the old wall . Later renamed Princes Dock after HRH the Prince Consort.

On 1st June 1853, Malton & Driffield Junction Railway opened its 19 miles of track to public traffic.

On 1st June 1875, Alice Elizabeth Rawson was the first person to be baptised in the newly created parish of Newington, in Newington parish Mission Room, Edinburgh St, before the church was built in 1878.

On 1st June 1891, the Royal Baccarat Scandal trial was the first time the heir to the throne was called as a witness in court. It began at a house party at Tranby Croft, Anlaby, (now Hull Collegiate School) home of Charles Wilson,  when Sir William Gordon-Cumming was accused of cheating at cards. Gordon-Cumming lost the slander case, and was dismissed from his army post the day after the trial ended. photo shows Charles Wilson’s memorial in Warter church.

Chas Wilson Nunburnholme