October 19th

On 19th October 1469, John Fisher was born in Beverley, the eldest son of Robert and Agnes Fisher. Chancellor of Cambridge University, Bishop of Rochester, and chaplain to royalty.  He was executed for treason 22.6.1535 on Tower Hill, for speaking out against Henry VIII’s divorce, and refusing to acknowledge the heirs of Henry and Ann Boleyn as legitimate successors to the throne. A Catholic martyr, he was canonized as St John Fisher.

On 19th October 1781, Rev George Lambert reported in his diary on a very high tide which inundated many houses in Hull.

On 19th October 1826, a Huggate parish jury of 12 men, 2 affearers (assessors of fines) and the pinder, set penalties for anyone allowing cattle into public lanes at night at 2s6d per head, for the first offence, and 5s per head for every offence afterwards; for allowing pigs in the streets without a ring between May Day and Michaelmas 3d per head; for allowing geese in the streets between Old Mayday and Old Lammas, 1s; for allowing anyone to stay who does not have a certificate allowing them to settle, £1 19s 11d.

On 19th October 1890, John Connell, boatman, of Waxholme, in the Coastguard Service, took part in the rescue of crew from the Grimsby vessel Genesta when it ran aground. All were rescued, except the captain, who died of exposure. Connell went on to the vessel as it was breaking up to rescue a man too weak to help himself. Connell was awarded the Humane Society Silver Medal. The unmanned vessel broke free the following day and travelled to Withernsea.

On 19th October 1964, rail passengers took their last trips on the Hull to Withernsea and Hull to Hornsea rail lines, which closed as a result of the Beeching Report. Goods services to Withernsea continued to 30.4.1965, to Hedon 3.5.1965, and to Marfleet to 1972. photo shows part of Hornsea Rail Trail today.

Hornsea Rail Trail

 

October 13th

Wm Bradley

 

On 13th October 1593, Oswold Ridinge, Robert Greene, William Giltencrosse, Steven Gedney, and William Deane were all before Patrington Manor Court for making affray, upon each other, and upon Thomas Blenckarne, and drawing blood of Oswold Ridinge; fined 3 shillings and 4 pence.

On 13th October 1743, William Wilberfoss Smith III died aged 75 Wrightstown, Bucks County, Province of Pennsylvania, USA. Emigrated from Weighton, Yorkshire in 1684 as an indentured servant to William Penn, and in 1686 built a cabin which is considered to be the oldest continuously occupied home in the United States.

On 13th October 1799, Rev George Lambert was called to pray with a Hull woman who had been in labour for several days, and treated by 4 surgeons who could not deliver the baby. She died.

On 13th October 1815, William Bradley, the Yorkshire Giant,  printed handbills inviting visitors to see him at 15 Queen Street, Hull during Hull Fair for a shilling.

On 13th October 1857, John Johnson, chimney sweep, was fined £5 or 7 days in prison at Beverley Magistrates Court, for employing a boy of 13 to go up a chimney in the house of Wilberforce Herdsman. Employing under 21s as sweeps was not finally outlawed nationally until 1875. Legislation in 1840 set the minimum age at 16, but was rarely enforced.

On 13th October 1859, the Theatre Royal, Humber Street, Hull, burnt down just 10 days after re-opening following a fire in September.

On 13th October 1926, in a 2-day visit to Hull, HRH Prince of Wales laid the foundation stone of the Ferens Art Gallery, visited HERIB and other factories and institutions, and took a trip on the Humber in SS Brocklesby. At Craven Park, 10,000 schoolchildren sang for him. Crowds were estimated at 200,000. this interesting clip begins with a reference to the West Riding, but stick with it, Hull is definitely there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQhZrcaMUuo

October 11th

ON 11th October 1536, Marmaduke Thomson, vicar of Preston, rang the church bell and called parishioners to meet at Nuthill, where he swore in local men to join the Pilgrimage of Grace. Around 300 Holderness men left to assemble at Sutton Ings. (& see 10.10)

On 11th October 1643, 1500 Parliamentary troops left the besieged town of Hull and after 2 attempts and many hours’ fighting, drove the Royalists out of all their positions around the town.

On 11th October 1782, Rev George Lambert described Hull Fair as ‘A season for the amusement of children and the gratification of gluttony’.

On 11th October 1929, Mrs Edith Robson officially opened Hedon Road Maternity Hospital, the successor to the free maternity home for poor mothers, which she gave as a gift, fully equipped, to Hull Corporation in 1915.

 

fair 07

October 3rd

On 3rd October 1667, Mark Turington, Peter Gorbut, Christopher Gray & Jane Sansbie were fined at Patrington for having bad fences or fences in bad repair.

On 3rd October 1810, Rev George Lambert of Hull wrote in his diary: ‘times never were more alarming than the present. Failure, bankruptcies and suicide are taking place every day, and public credit shaken to its foundation. No man knows today what will be his circumstances tomorrow’.

On 3rd October 1821, Dr Raffles preached to 600 people on board the Valiant in Queen’s Dock, Hull, a new floating chapel bought by The Port of Hull Society for the Religious Instruction of Seamen. It was used for 28 years until the vessel was leaking and abandoned in 1850.

On 3rd October 1884, Elsie March, sculptor, painter and metalworker, was born in Sutton (or Old Hall, Burstwick?), one of 8 artist siblings born to foreman seed crusher George Henry March. Moved to Battersea 1901. With 5 of her brothers, created the Canadian War memorial in Ottawa completed in 1938. see photo (d 1974, Kent)

On 3rd October 1898, Ernst Adolf Powolny opened a restaurant in King Edward Street which became a Hull institution, providing high class food in opulent surroundings, as well as tea dances and catering for civic events. Closed temporarily by a fire in 1934, it finally closed after being destroyed by the Blitz on 8.5.1941. Known affectionately as ‘Polly’s’.

Elsie March

August 18th

On 18th August 1522, Thomas Webster, a weaver from Lowthorpe, claimed sanctuary in St John’s Church, Beverley, for the death of Thomas Ayke of Littlebeck. On the same day, a 2nd man entered the sanctuary – John Thorp, a husbandman of Eastrington, for a felony.

On 18th August 1552, Church commissioners seized items of value from St Giles Church, Marfleet, no longer needed in plainer protestant services, including a silver chalice, brass candlesticks, bells and a brass holy water vat. Witnesses from the parish were Marmaduke Loickwos, Herry Birkett, Richard Walker, and Thomas Almonde.

On 18th August 1782, Rev George Lambert reported seeing a meteor or fireball pass over the town in the morning, which alarmed many people.

On 18th August 1808, Margaret Kissling, nee Moxon, was born in Sculcoates.  She married a Lutheran missionary, worked in Sierra Leone and settled in New Zealand as teacher and nurse. (d 20.9.1891)

On 18th August 1832, Charles Winn, Tory candidate, issued a poster to refute allegations that he supported slavery, during his General Election campaign.

On 18th August 1941, an air raid destroyed St Margaret’s Church, Hilston, the 3rdchurch on this site, its predecessor having been replaced in 1862 by Sir Tatton Sykes. The only remnant of the first church is its Norman doorway. The current church was consecrated in 1957, built by local architect Francis Johnson, and was listed in 2017.

 

hilston church & tower.JPG

 

   

 

August 10th

On 10th August 1530, Gilbert Cornevell, fishmonger of Beverley, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, ‘for a felony committed at Kirkelly (Kirk Ella) and because he engaged in false coining and for other reasons’.

On 10th August 1785, Rev George Lambert of Hull saw a 2ndwhale displayed at South End, which had beached near Wintringham.

On 10th August 1889, 30 Hull workmen left Hull on a trip to the Paris Exhibition, at the expense of Hull Central MP Henry King. They included sculptor John S. Holmes, jeweller James Lord, stonemason Edwin Quibell, with painters, fitters joiners etc.

On 10th August 1915, Ralph Thomas was born in Hull. Film director, best known for directing the “Doctor” series of films and other comedies, but also directed the 1959 version of ‘The 39 Steps’, ‘Tale of  Two Cities’, ‘Campbell’s Kingdom’ etc.  His brother Gerald directed the ‘Carry On’ series. (d 17.3.2001)

   

Ralph thomas_

August 9th

Bishop's Palace, Howden

On 9th August 1260, Walter of Kirkham, Bishop of Durham, died at the Bishop’s Palace, Howden. His body was taken to Durham for burial but his viscera were buried in the church. photo shows what remains of Bishop’s Palace.

On 9th August 1516, Sir Ralph Ellerker of Risby confessed to Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, Archbishop of York, that he ordered his servants Henry Norham and Roberte Hunt to kidnap George Millet, keeper of Beverley Parks, and imprison him in Cottingham Park so that he could hunt on the Archbishop’s land. Pleading poverty, he was bound over in the sum of £200.

On 9th August 1769, John Burrill of Skipsea assaulted John Warcup with swords, staves, knives and clubs so that his life was threatened and ‘other wrongs’. Burrill was indicted in September, found guilty on 24.4.1770, and sentenced 2.10.1770 to a fine of £20 and to remain in gaol until the fine was paid.

On 9th August 1785, Rev George Lambert went to see a 24 foot whale killed and displayed at South End, Hull (near modern pier); described by sailors as a young bottlenecked grampus.

On 9th August 1859, Hansard records the 29.4.1859 election in Beverley void; Ralph Walters was declared ‘not a Burgess to serve in this present Parliament for the Borough of Beverley’ and Henry Edwards was declared MP in his place. Joseph Robinson Pease in his diary called Walters ‘an adventurer, arriving 3 days previously’, ‘by open bribery …. carried the day.’

On 9th August 1902, William Day Keyworth junior, sculptor, died aged 59 in Spring Bank, Hull. He produced many statues of civic dignitaries, including Andrew Marvell, Anthony Bannister and William Wilberforce (now outside Wilberforce House). Shot himself in the head at his home, but left no suicide note.

On the same day, Nafferton villagers were celebrating King Edward VII’s coronation with, among other events, a ‘comic’ cricket match, gentlemen vs ladies, which the ladies won. The score is not recorded.

On 9th August 1915, 17 Goole residents, mostly women and children, were killed by a Zeppelin raid on the town and docks.

On 9th August 1916, a Zeppelin raid on Anlaby Road, Hull,  killed John Broadley aged 3 and at least 7 other residents, and injured about 20. 2 people died of shock. Rev A.W. Carter, Assistant Priest of Newington Church, was badly hurt.