May 30th

On 30th May 1778, Frank Slaiter returned to work at Escrick Hall 4 ½ months after breaking his thigh at work. His employer, Beilby Thompson, paid his medical fees, and gave him an allowance of 2/3 his normal wage while he was off sick.

On 30th May 1782, Rev George Lambert and Mr Towers began a journey to London with a ferry crossing of the Humber, which took 3 hours; it took from 11a.m. to the evening to reach Lincoln by coach. They arrived in London about 50 hours after leaving Hull. This was probably typical for the time.

On 30th May 1820, William Bradley died aged 33 of tuberculosis in  Market Weighton. Known as the Yorkshire Giant, he grew to 7’9”. Travelled with shows and fairs, and later charged visitors to his home. Was presented to King George III. (b 10.2.1787)

On 30th May 1859, a Hull Coroner’s Court jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against Isabella Hewson.  On 27.5 she had hanged her son, aged 2, and then gave herself up to police. No evidence of insanity was found on medical examination.

On 30th May 1912, Brigadier Mark Sykes inspected the Yorkshire Catholic Reformatory, Market Weighton, and found lack of discipline, bullying, filth, poor food, lack of fire precautions and drill, and poor medical treatment. Recommended all staff but one be dismissed. The management of the school was changed later that year.

 

Yorks reformatory

 

 

 

 

 

May 25th

On 25th May 1537, Dr James Cockerell, Prior of Guisborough, was hanged, drawn and quartered for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace; he was vicar of Hessle from 1509-1519.

On 25th May 1693, Robert Jackson, under-keeper of the lighthouse at Spurn, locked himself in the lighthouse and secured the door when told a party of armed employees of Lord Dunbar (Lord of Holderness) were on their way to claim ownership. They undermined the walls and took Jackson prisoner to York Castle.

On 25th May 1770, the Driffield Canal Commissioners fully opened the new Driffield Canal, which gave the merchants of this then small hamlet access to the River Hull and the sea. Between 1784 and 1799, 6 warehouses were built at River Head, and new factories and cargo vessels used the canal. photo shows the canal today

On 25th May 1815, Parliament passed an Act to create the Pocklington Canal. Most of the subscribers were titled and/or landed gentry, but among those who bought shares at £100 were innkeepers, a blacksmith, saddler, grocer, and 4 single women (spinsters or widows).

On 25th May 1826, Mr Brown made a balloon ascent from Mr Thompson’s yard, Beverley, which was described as ‘splendid’. Winds took the balloon south west where it crash landed on the moors between Thorne and Crowle, Mr Brown sustaining an injury to his spine. He was able to travel to Sheffield for another balloon trip.

Driffield Canal

May 24th

Edward I

Edward I statue, Hull Guildhall

 

On 24th May 1300, King Edward I landed in Hessle  from the Barton ferry, his retinue taking up 11 vessels and taking 2 days to make the crossings. Galfrid de Selby was paid 13shillings for the crossing. The King went to Hull and then on to Beverley.

On 24th May 1772, Parliament passed an Act to create the Market Weighton Canal, not just to transport goods, but also to prevent regular flooding of 20,000 acres of land.

On 24th May 1930, Amy Johnson landed in Darwin after flying 11,000 miles; the first woman to fly from the UK to Australia; she received the CBE and great public acclaim.

On 24th May 1943, the crew of Lancaster bomber W4303 crashed at Humbleton on a training flight, killing the 8 crew, aged from 21 to 30. The Australian pilot Bryde and flight engineer Nelson are buried in Brandesburton.

On 24th May 1962, Tom Knight and Saif Messin, engineers, and Bryan Webb, deck boy, 15, were trapped and died when the tug Tollman capsized in Hull’s Alexandra Dock while towing the Finnish ship Inio. The skipper and mate were saved. United Towing made changes to towing systems as a result.