January 1st

January

On 1st January 1151, Meaux Abbey was founded on land given by William le Gros, Count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness.

On 1st January 1645, Captain John Hotham was executed for treason at Tower Hill, London.

On 1st January 1685, Alderman Duncalf of Hull gave £5, the interest of which to be given to the poor of Patrington every New Years Day.

On 1st January 1754, Joseph Pease opened Hull’s (and Yorkshire’s) first commercial bank at 18, High Street, Hull.

On 1st January 1841, Daniel Boyes, landlord of the Angel Inn, Beverley, started a new tradition, to bake an enormous game pie for customers; it weighed more than 7 stone. In 1844 the pie weighed 10 stone, and was 18” wide, 12” high, and 2’ 2” long.

On 1st January 1904, Hull GP Dr Francis William Fullerton obtained the first driving licence issued in Hull.

On 1st January 1908, the newly created Humber Conservancy Board took over responsibility for Humber lifeboats from Hull Trinity House, which had managed Spurn lifeboat for 97 years. The Board did not seem to realise the complexity of running a lifeboat service, and after 3 years of arguments, the RNLI took over in 1911.

10th May

On 10th May 1346, John de Manby and Eobert de Seton, both of Beverley, were convicted before the king at Nottingham of the death of Adam Coppendale, merchant of Beverley, at Barton on Humber.

On 10th May 1377, King Edward III’s parliament issued a statute pardoning the Mayor and town of Hull. I have not found what the pardon was for, and Edward was very ill at the time, and died in June.

On 10th May 1527, Thomas Richerdson, husbandman of Lockington, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 10th May 1595, the Howden churchwardens ‘paid to the lame soldiers by the Chief Constable warrant 21s8d’.

On 10th May 1707, Hull-born Dr Thomas Watson, Bishop of St David’s made proposals to contribute to the cost of rebuilding almshouses in North Church Side, Hull. Later correspondence indicated that he wished to influence the rules by which they were to be managed.

On 10th May 1854, William Marshall’s flax mill at Patrington was burnt down, throwing 100 people out of work.

On 10th May 1866, asked the town council to cover a foul ditch where sewage collected in pools; the ditch remained open. Hedon had suffered badly from cholera in 1849. The ditch was not covered until 1873.

On 10th May 1910, Robt R. Leonard & Son sold at auction the effects of the Hull Racecourse Company, including luxury furniture and fittings from the grandstand, and grounds equipment. The racecourse was at Twyers land, Preston South.

On 10th May 1946, Maureen Lipman was born in Hull.  TV and film actor, stage performer, and writer, CBE. Awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Hull in 1994.

 

 

May 9th

On 9th May 1688, Francis Reame was accused in Patrington manor court of not declaring money and a ring he found during building work; it was declared that the items were treasure trove and belonged to the lord of the manor.

On 9th May 1708, the congregation of Cottingham church gave 2s and a penny-halfpenny in a collection for building a protestant church ‘in the Duchy of Berg, within the Empire of Germany’.

On 9th May 1774, 101 Yorkshire emigrants landed at Halifax, Nova Scotia, from Hull aboard The Two Friends. Many were tenants of Beilby Thompson of Escrick, some citing rising rents as their reason for emigrating. In the years 1772-5, 1,000 people emigrated to Nova Scotia from Yorkshire.

On 9th May 1793, Rev Arthur Robinson died in Hull aged 78. He had retired 4 years before as vicar of Holy Trinity (with a gift of civic silver worth £50), but was also vicar of St Giles, Marfleet, whose parishioners said they had seen him only once in 25 years.

On 9th May 1896, Holderness Polo Club held Hull’s first game of polo at Tranby Croft. The teams were Singles and Marrieds; the Singles won 6:5. Later matches were played at a ground in Westbourne Avenue, on land now covered by Westbourne Ave West to Perth St West.

On 9th May 1930, Thomas Robinson Ferens died at the age of 83. The former East Hull MP spoke often in support of women’s rights; was general manager and joint chairman of Reckitts. In his will he left land to the city for an art gallery, for a university college, and large charitable bequests. (b 4.5.1847)

April 4th

 

Pat church

On 4th April 1654, Emmot Laykes, wife of John Laykes, was fined in Patrington manor court for striking Gregory Bilton with a rolling-pin.

On 4th April 1868, Frederick Parker of Hemingbrough was executed at York Castle and his body buried within the prison for murdering Daniel Driscoll, 27, at South Duffield on 29.2.1868.

On 4th April 1942, Laura Jaselli, Italian alien, of Barrow Lane, Hessle, was given a Travel Permit registered with the East Riding Police (cert 379095) as an Alien on moving from Ashton under Lyme; she was allowed 17 ½ hours to complete the move.

March 10th

Holy Trinity

On 10th March 1425, Hull Holy Trinity Church, was consecrated; building began in 1291 and was interrupted by the Black Death.

On 10th March 1447, Henry VI issued a charter enlarging the county of Hull to include Hessle, North Ferriby, Swanland, West Ella, Kirk Ella, Tranby, Willerby, Wolfreton, Anlaby, the site of Haltemprice Priory and Derringham Dike.

On 10th March 1623, George Tummond, butcher, of Patrington, was found dying at sunrise in Winestead, after starting to walk home from the alehouse in Ottringham. Holderness was notorious for its floods.

On 10th March 1800, George Hudson, the “Railway King’, was born in Howsham.  He  made a great business and political career from sharp practice and bribery (was MP for Sunderland, and Lord Mayor of York). He became hugely rich, but was disgraced, and imprisoned for debt, though released when his debts were paid by public subscription. In 1845, he bought the Londesborough Estate for £470,000. D14.12.1871

On 10th March 1823, John Bacchus Dykes was born in Hull. By the age of 10, was assistant organist at St John’s Church, Myton. Became a vicar, and composed over 300 hymn tunes, including ‘Eternal Father, Strong to Save’ and ‘We plough the fields and scatter’. (d 22.1.1876)

On 10th March 1921, Mr J.H. Tate proposed a motion at Hornsea Golf Club that ’Old Jack be shot’! It is assumed Old Jack was the horse used to pull mowers and rollers on the course.

On 10th March 1954, Alex May, master of the tug Fenman, died in hospital after the tug was overrun by the ship she was towing, the Rudolf, and sank, on the way into Hull’s Alexandra Dock. 2 of the crew were swept away. There was 1 survivor.

February 15th

On February 15th 1518, Richard Jakson of Hogett on the Wolds (presumably modern Huggate) claimed the sanctuary of St John’s church, Beverley, for debt.

On February 15th 1530, John Gillco, labourer of Painsthorpe, fled to his parish church in Kirby Underdale from York, where he had assaulted and killed John Notyngham at 4p.m. the previous day. A coroner’s inquest the same day reported that the killing took place within the liberty of the monastery of the Blessed Mary.

On February 15th 1793, a contemporary report said a horseman galloped into Hull with urgent news that men had landed near Patrington from a privateer. Nervous of the risk of French invasion, part of the Corps of Invalids stationed at the Citadel and several volunteer seamen were immediately dispatched to meet the enemy. A 2ndmessenger met them on the road near Hedon, and informed them that instead of French enemies, those who had landed were the crews of several colliers, who had left their ships to avoid the press gang. HM Sloop of War, The Queen, was lying at anchor in the Humber.

On February 15th 1898, James Ashton, 39, skipper, of Witty St, Hull, was lost with his crew when trawler European foundered in the North Sea.

press-gang

January 19th

 

Pilgr Grace

On 19th January 1537, Sir Francis Bigod was attacked by Ellerker’s men in Beverley, and most of his men were captured. After failing to capture Scarborough, he had gathered more followers at Bainton, but heard that John Hallam had failed to capture Hull. Bigod escaped to the north, and was eventually captured in March. Both Bigod and Hallam were executed.

On 19th January 1684, Sir Robert Hilyard, knight & Baron of Patrington, gave his son Capt Robert Hilyard ‘2 whole pues or closets, which were positioned in the South Transept’.

On 19th January 1970, Alan Plater oversaw the first production at the new theatre in Spring Street of his own play ‘Don’t Build a Bridge, Drain the River’, with music by Mike Chapman and Mike Waterson. The Humberside Arts Centre later became Humberside Theatre, and then Hull Truck Theatre. see photo

On 19th January 1979, William Rodgers, Secretary of State for Transport, reported in the House of Commons that as the result of an industrial dispute in the road haulage industry, there was no movement of grain or animal feed out of Hull docks. The importance of Hull was stressed, as other parts of the country depended on it to deliver goods.

On 19th January 2014, the Environment Agency closed Sutton Lock on the River Derwent to navigation due to safety concerns. The lock had been reconstructed in 1972 to enable pleasure craft to travel up to Stamford Bridge and give access to the Pocklington Canal. There seemed to be uncertainty as to who owned the gates and equipment.

Spring St theatre