April 16th

On 16th April 1313, Petronilla de Scarfon conveyed ownership of land to the East of Vicar Lane, Hull, to William Brimswein of Ottringham.  On the same day, John de London conveyed land on East side of Vicar Lane to Ingram Sonnolf of Ottringham. The town was growing, and drawing in landowners from the local area.

On 16th April 1454, William Eland, enrolled in post as Hull Collector of Customs, joining existing staff Richard Bryd (Collector) and Ralph Babthorp (Controller).

On 16th April 1532, Christopher Hoggeson, labourer of Thorngumbald, claimed the sanctuary of the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 16th April 1680, Sir Edward Barnard wrote to Hull Mayor about ‘Darningham Springs’, one of several letters around this time from landowners concerned about ‘the placing of stops in land drains’. The stream was again getting polluted, and a dam was proposed to stop runoff from the land getting into the drinking water.

minster - frith stool.JPG

January 11th

On 11th January 1582, Hull widow Jane Smyth was ordered to be put in the stocks at the next market, with a paper on her head, and given notice to quit the house she rented from the town, for cursing and slandering the mayor, justices, aldermen and the preacher, accusing them of  ‘punishing the town with water’ and punishing her son.

On the same day, Henrie Wakewood of Hull was ordered either to pay 10d a week to Elizabeth Bratton for the support of their child Isabell, and be whipped on market day, or to marry her and have his punishment deferred. Decision on Elizabeth’s punishment was deferred until she had been churched.

On 11th January 1642, Sir John Hotham was appointed by Parliament as the Governor of Hull.

john-hotham-1-sized

 

December 14th

Ebberston Yorks Aelfrids Memorial

 

On 14th December 704, the Anglo Saxon Chronicle records, King Aldfrith of Northumbria died in battle at Ebberston and was buried at Little Driffield. A man of great learning, educated for a career in the church, but he succeeded to the throne when his brother died. A memorial to him, called King Alfred’s Stone, is at Ebberston, North Yorks. Driffield may have been a royal seat of the Saxon kings. (sources vary as to his exact dates)

On 14th December 1610, an anonymous tinker was invited in to Londesborough House, home of the Earl of Cumberland, to mend broken pans and was paid 3s4d by the clerk of the kitchen.

On 14th December 1660, surgeon Joseph Thornnton was granted a licence to practice in Hull, after being invited to move from Great Horton, West Riding, to deal with a typhus outbreak. 18 people signed a testimonial to his effectiveness.

On 14th December 1775, Hull Corporation delegated its responsibility to provide a town dump to the official Town Scavenger; the condition of the Spring Ditch soon gave cause for concern, and in 1777 a bank was built to stop dung and rubbish entering the water.

December 8th

turkey lectern3.JPG

 

On 8th December 1536, armed men from Holderness who had seized Hull in the Pilgrimage of Grace restored the town to the Mayor and dispersed.

On 8th December 1598, William Strickland died in Boynton. When young, he had travelled to America on voyages of exploration with Sebastian Cabot, and is credited with introducing the turkey to England. Later became a prominent Puritan MP. photo shows the Turkey Lectern in Boynton church.

On 8th December 1629, George Acklam of Bewholme died aged 64, and left £5 to Hornsea church to distribute to the poor every year on Maundy Thursday ‘forever’.

On 8th December 1637, Hull Mayor John Ramsden was buried; he died of plague. Andrew Marvell gave the funeral oration. His son, also John Ramsden, became Hull MP. This outbreak of plague in Hull killed over 2,500 people, and many more left the town. 

On 8th December 1879, William Walden, engineer and brewer, died aged 62. In a time when Hull was beset with cholera, he offered to supply Hull with clean water from Springhead at the rate of 5m gallons of water per day, at a fee of £500, or if he failed, be paid nothing. He succeeded. He is buried in Hull General Cemetery.

Springhead bore hole

December 5th

On 5th December 1679, the Commissioner of Sewers ordered that the earth banks of the Julian and Derringham Springs be replaced with brick or stone, to keep Hull’s drinking water from contamination.

On 5th December 2013, high tides and storm surge breach Spurn Point, destroy much of the road, and drown about 30 sheep. Yorkshire Wildlife Trust have not repaired the temporary roadway, deciding to leave the Point to nature.

Spurn to river from sea.JPG

November 26th

On 26th November 1319, Geoffrey Fitz Hugh and John de Wetewang conveyed property in Lyle Street (Mytongate), Hull,  to Hugh and Ellen Le Taverner.

On 26th November 1525, Richard Haton, gentleman, from Hayton, claimed sanctuary in St Mary’s Church, Hertford, and confessed to the coroner  that in October he had broken into a parish church in Essex and stolen a silver chalice; and in January he had burgled a house in Bucks and stolen jewellery and money. He abjured, i.e. renounced his country, and left through the port of Southampton.

On 26th November 1597, Sir Francis Barrington, Lord of the Manor of Cottingham (and uncle by marriage of Oliver Cromwell) wrote objecting to Hull Corporation’s drainage plan to move surplus water through his clough at Cottingham, which he said would risk flooding in the area.

On 26th November 1831, Joseph Robinson Pease, JP, spent his third consecutive day swearing in Special Constables to deal with anticipated riots; various sources say between 800 and 2,000 were sworn. James Acland had formed the Hull Political Union, and held meetings critical of the Hull Corporation, and said the aldermen were of out of touch and did not live in the town.

On 26th November 1847, Pocklington Canal Company agreed, at the Feathers Hotel, Pocklington, to sell the canal to the York & North Midland Railway, which also purchased the Market Weighton and Leven Canals. The canal had never been a financial success, and the railway company subsequently raised canal tolls so as to drive freight traffic onto the trains.

Pocklington canal
Melbourne lock

October 12th

On 12th October 1536, 9,000 armed men from across East Yorkshire mustered on Market Weighton Hill as part of the Pilgrimage of Grace. Robert Aske led one group to York via Pocklington, and William Stapleton led a march on Hull, besieged it and captured it for the rebels. Holderness gentry Sir John Constable, Sir Wm Constable and Sir Ralph Ellerker had taken refuge in the town from the revolt.

On 12th October 1643, the Earl of Newcastle abandoned the 2ndsiege of Hull after 5 weeks and withdrew Royalist forces to York. To prevent pursuit, the Royalists destroyed bridges and roads and cut the banks of waterways as they retreated. The date was observed as a day of public thanksgiving in Hull until the Restoration.

On 12th October 1697, Robert Pattinson, Humber pilot, was fined 30shillings for damaging the ‘dolphin’ at the entrance to the River Hull while handling a vessel entering the Haven.

On 12th October 1767, Beverley gentleman John Courtney reported in his diary seeing a firework display for the first time, in the Market Place, paid for by subscription.

On 12th October 1896, at Hull Fair, one of the attrractions was the first showing in Hull of moving pictures, only 8 months after Louis Lumiere’s first performance, included scenes of Whitefriargate, the W’force Monument, the Corporation Pier, the Humber Ferry.

On 12th October 1933, Louis Armstrong performed at Beverley Road Baths, Hull, during his European Tour.

 

louis armstrong