10th May

On 10th May 1346, John de Manby and Eobert de Seton, both of Beverley, were convicted before the king at Nottingham of the death of Adam Coppendale, merchant of Beverley, at Barton on Humber.

On 10th May 1377, King Edward III’s parliament issued a statute pardoning the Mayor and town of Hull. I have not found what the pardon was for, and Edward was very ill at the time, and died in June.

On 10th May 1527, Thomas Richerdson, husbandman of Lockington, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 10th May 1595, the Howden churchwardens ‘paid to the lame soldiers by the Chief Constable warrant 21s8d’.

On 10th May 1707, Hull-born Dr Thomas Watson, Bishop of St David’s made proposals to contribute to the cost of rebuilding almshouses in North Church Side, Hull. Later correspondence indicated that he wished to influence the rules by which they were to be managed.

On 10th May 1854, William Marshall’s flax mill at Patrington was burnt down, throwing 100 people out of work.

On 10th May 1866, asked the town council to cover a foul ditch where sewage collected in pools; the ditch remained open. Hedon had suffered badly from cholera in 1849. The ditch was not covered until 1873.

On 10th May 1910, Robt R. Leonard & Son sold at auction the effects of the Hull Racecourse Company, including luxury furniture and fittings from the grandstand, and grounds equipment. The racecourse was at Twyers land, Preston South.

On 10th May 1946, Maureen Lipman was born in Hull.  TV and film actor, stage performer, and writer, CBE. Awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Hull in 1994.

 

 

8th May

On 8th May 1660, the day on which it was proclaimed in London that Charles II had been King since the execution of his father, Hull ordered the arms of the Commonwealth removed from Hull Town Hall,  to be replaced with the King’s arms, and that the town’s maces be engraved with the King’s arms.

On 8th May 1926, mounted police on Monument Bridge, Hull, baton charged crowds trying to prevent volunteers signing up in the City Hall, on the 5th day of the General Strike. 41 people needed hospital treatment.

On 8th May 1941, Hull suffered its worst air raid on of WW2 overnight; 420 people killed, 800 injured, more than 800 fires; the Prudential building collapsed on top of its basement air raid shelter; 3,000 houses were destroyed and a further 9,000 damaged. 35 churches were hit, 2 synagogues, 14 schools; 2 million sq ft of factory space damaged or destroyed; notable buildings such as House of Powolny restaurant; extensive damage to the docks, including the destruction of Riverside Quay. 40,000 people made homeless in the month. A large number of commendations for gallantry were made this night and the following night – too many to record here.

On the same night, a German landmine fell on Magdalen Lane, Hedon, killing 12 people and destroying 2 houses.

April 29th

St Mary's Beverley

On 29th April 1520, the tower of St Mary’s Beverley collapsed across the nave, killing many people in the church for the Sunday service. A piece of 16thC oak carved with an inscription to the event remains in the church. Sir Richard Rokeby and his wife Dame Joan gave £200 to rebuild the church.

On 29th April 1524, William Thowe of Hedon rented to the Mayor and town of Hull a patch of waste ground near St Mary’s church for a chaplain’s house; the annual rent was a red rose if demanded, i.e. the medieval equivalent of a peppercorn rent.

On 29th April 1757, the vicar of Hutton Cranswick recorded a very deep fall of snow.

On 29th April 1891, former Trinity House School pupil Herbert William Rea was shipwrecked on the Pacific coast of North America in 1880 on his first sea trip; he joined a schooner trading to the Pacific Islands, and was later appointed collector of taxes in Samoa.

 

April 20th

On 20th April 1602, Robert Watkinson of Hemingbrough, aged 23, was hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn, London, as a Catholic priest; he was arrested almost immediately on returning to England after ordination at Arras, France.

On 20th April 1803, a sloop was ‘burnt to the water’s edge’ in Hedon harbour.

On 20th April 1808, Thomas Wilbe, 31, of Hull, was hanged at York Castle for raping a girl under 10 years old.

On 20th April 1892, former pupil of Hull Trinity House School, and Chief Officer of the Elliot of Caernarvon, William Henry Ansell, 29, died of yellow fever at Santos.

On 20th April 1976, Rev Wm Whitehead, on the 190thanniversary of the first recorded measurement of distance from Mappleton church to the sea, recorded the distance to the cliff edge.  At 898 ft 10”, it was almost exactly 1,000 feet less than in 1786, an average of 5ft 3” p.a.  Film clip: https://www.bbc.co.uk/education/clips/z8jfb9q

mappleton.JPG

March 26th

On 26th March 1646, Hull merchant James Watkinson was fined £400 as a member of the Royalist army (delinquent) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament.

On 26th March 1706, the congregation of Cottingham church gave 4s in a collection for the repair of Beverley Minster.

On 26th March 1740, John Burnham and Ralph Burnsall of Preston bought 2 fields from Benjamin Waive of Hull, half the income from which was used to give to the poor, and half to pay for a schoolmaster to educate poor children in the village.

On 26th March 1827, an evening’s entertainment at Theatre Hedon (presumably in the Town Hall) included a performance of Hamlet, a recitation, and a farce.

On 26th March 1933, Sir Alexander Wentworth Macdonald Bosville Macdonald of the Isles, 13thbaronet, died at Rudston aged 67  and is buried in the churchyard. (b26.9.1865)

MacDonalds of the Isles

March 12th

On 12th March 1511, Elizabeth Nelson, spinster of Pollington, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for felony and murder of an infant (possibly her own child) at Hull.

On 12th March 1553, on the surrender to King Edward VI of the castle and fortifications at Hull, the King granted to Ralph Constable former monastery lands in Swine, Newton Grange, and all the extensive lands formerly belonging to the dissolved Hospital of St Sepulchre, Hedon. He was also the tenant of the site of Hull Charterhouse.

On 12th March 1622, Josias Lambert, schoolmaster, left the employment of Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, after 9 months teaching ‘scholars’, which may have included some of the Londesborough House household staff and/or their children. The Earl also supported the village school at (Market) Weighton. photo shows Londesborough church

On 12th March 1647, Sir Matthew Boynton died at Bainton aged 56. Sheriff of Yorkshire twice, MP twice (once for Hedon and once for Scarborough), 1stBaronet, of Barmston. He helped capture Sir John Hotham when he intended to surrender Hull to the Royalists. His son Colonel Matthew Boynton was killed fighting for the Royalists in the Battle of Wigan Lane in 1651. (bapt 26.1.1591)

On 12th March 1697, the Brethren of Hull Trinity House charged almost £21 for the launch of the 60-gun Royal Navy ship HMS Kingston from Hessle. Work included laying buoys from the launching site to Hull.

Londesborough

March 5th

On 5th March 1514, John Taillour of Beverley claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for ‘the security of his body’, but the register does not state who was threatening him, or why.

On 5th March 1642, Queen Henrietta Maria stopped one night at the Manor House, Burton Fleming. She was still on her way to York to join her husband, Charles I, with arms from Holland. She is then said to have stayed 2 weeks at Boynton with the Stricklands. Luckily, Sir William, Parliamentary MP for Hedon, was away in London.

On 5th March 1646, Hull merchant Leonard Scott was fined £74 10s as a member of the Royalist army (a ‘delinquent’) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament.

On 5th March 1916, Martha, Ethel and Mira Ingamells of Linnaeus St, Hull, were among the 18 people who died in the 2ndZeppelin raid on Hull; 60 people were injured. Queen Street was hit, as were Linnaeus St., Porter St., Church St and Selby St, and Earle’s shipyard. A mob afterwards smashed up a vehicle belonging to the Royal Flying Corps, presumably in anger at their failure to defend the town, resulting in hasty installation of 7 guns, and the general strengthening of defences around the Humber. Bombs were also dropped on Gembling and Woodmansey.

WWI Zeppelin