December 28th

Beverley Minster

 

On 28th December 1703, an earthquake was felt in Beverley, and may have worsened the already poor condition of the fabric of the Minster.

On 28th December 1795, the Duke of Portland, Home Secretary,  wrote to the Hull Mayor and other town councils concerning methods to be adopted for reducing the consumption of wheat. There had been several years’ poor harvest, and supply was reduced by war with France. There were  food riots in Hull in August that year.

 

December 16th

On 16th December 1512, William Crag of Cave claimed sanctuary at the church of St Cuthbert, Durham, for ‘asportation’; along with others, he had stolen 25 horses and mares, near Cave; in addition, in a certain park near Airton by York, he stole 3 other horses.

On 16th December 1586, the Earl of Huntingdon, on behalf of the Council in the North, wrote to the Hull Corporation to ask them to prevent merchants profiteering from the corn shortage by purchasing stocks for poor relief at a reasonable rate.

On 16th December 1645, Hull draper Robert Cartwright was fined £47 as a former Captain in the Royalist army (a ‘delinquent’) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament.

On 16th December 1689, a number of Danish soldiers were in William of Orange’s army, and 2 of them quarrelled and settled their dispute by a sword duel at Beverley. The survivor was beheaded in Saturday Market. (see 23.12)

On 16th December 1929, the R100 airship, the largest airship ever designed, made by a team led by Sir Barnes Neville Wallis, and including novelist Neville Shute Norway, took its maiden voyage from Spaldington Air Station.

On 16th December 2010, Easington tithe barn was offered for sale at an auction with a guide price of £125,000 and failed to sell. The 14thC building is the last remaining tithe barn in the county, and a Grade II listed building.

Easington tithe barn

August 4th

On 4th August 1511, John Hessey, husbandman of Belby, nr Howden, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of William Smyth of Didyngham (anyone know where this is?)

On 4th August 1652, Keyingham manor court fined 18 villagers for allowing their geese and pigs into the fields outside the stipulated times.

On 4th August 1795, Hull residents rioted against inflationary food prices and shortages. Much corn was being taken by the army, (Napoleonic Wars) in a year of poor weather. A few windows broken.

On 4th August 1834, John Venn, was born in Drypool, son of the vicar. Left Hull at age 8. Fellow of the Royal Society, famous mathematician, who introduced the Venn diagram. Commemorated in Hull University by the Venn Building. (d 4.4.1923) and by Drypool Bridge.

On 4th August 1851, G. Hought of Hutton Cranswick was killed by lightning, as he sheltered under a tree during a thunderstorm. He left a wife and 2 children.

On 4th August 1884, all 11 Walgate brothers of Aldbrough formed one cricket team in a match held at Rise Hall; the Walgates won the match by 3 wickets.

On 4th August 1969, HM Queen Elizabeth opened Queen Elizabeth Dock, the last major dock to be opened in Hull, accompanied by HRH Duke of Edinburgh and Princess Anne.

 

Drypool Bridge

July 1st

On 1st July 1643, cannoneer John Stevenson was buried in St Mary’s Beverley, having died in the town in a ‘great scrimmage’ in the Civil War (possibly the day before).

On 1st July 1801, Hull Subscription Mill Ltd opened to provide cheap flour to the poor of Hull, 3 years or so after the opening of Hull Anti-Mill, one of the first co-operatives in the country.

On 1st July 1830, the Hull whaler Eagle had been stuck in the ice of Baffin Bay for 5 days.   With the help of 200 men from nearby ships, Captain Matthew Wright and crew, were finally able to repair the keel and heave the ship upright again.

On 1st July 1903, Amy Johnson was born in St George’s Road, Hull. She went on to become the first woman to fly solo to Australia, and to break many aviation records. (d5.1.1941)

On 1st July 1918, Hull coroner Colonel Alfred Thorney held inquests on 2 early cases in the flu epidemic: Kate Denman, aged 11, daughter of a labourer of Hodgson Street, and Elsie Barton, aged 9, daughter of a soldier, of Arthur’s Terrace Courtney Street. Both died within 24 hours of being taken ill, of influenza followed by pneumonia.

On 1st July 1940, the first-ever daylight air-raid on the British mainland attacked Saltend oil terminal.  Between 16.40 and 17.00, bombs caused a 2,500-ton tank of oil to explode, and threatened to spread to other tanks. For preventing even greater damage, the following were all awarded the George Medal: Clifford Turner, leading fireman; William Sigsworth, Manager, Anglo-American Oil Co Ltd; George Samuel Sewell, engineer, Shell-Mex & BP Ltd; Jack Owen, fireman; George Archibald Howe, Manager, Shell-Mex & BP Ltd. No loss of life.

On 1st July 1976, Withernsea Lighthouse ceased operating, after 82 years, having been superseded by modern navigational aids. It is now open to the public as a museum to Kay Kendall, to local history and the lifeboat service.Withernsea

June 15th

trinity house.JPG

 

On 15th June 1795, Hull Trinity House agreed to give £100 to the Mayor’s fund to buy corn and resell it to the poor at a discount, as war was causing food scarcities.

On 15th June 1911, due to financial difficulties, the Smith (Smijth) family put the whole of the Windham Estate at Wawne up for auction over 2 days. This included 12 farms, smallholdings, rows of cottages, the Ferry, the pub, post office, grocer’s, tailor’s, the school. Almost the whole village had to find new tenancies. The estate had been in the hands of the Ashe family and their successors since the 17thC.

June 7th

On 7th June 1614, Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, of Londesborough House, paid for the apprenticeship of his scullery-maid Grace. He trained in London as a barber-surgeon for 7 years, and the Earl continued to support him when he had to transfer employers, as his first employer killed a man (perhaps in the course of treatment).

On 7th June 1672, the residents of Sister-Kirks (Owthorne and Withernsea) reported hearing the sound of the naval battle of Solebay, off the coast of Suffolk. A fleet of 75 Dutch ships surprised a fleet of 93 Anglo-French ships at anchor.

On 7th June 1796, Sir Henry Etherington laid the foundation stone of Hull Anti-Mill, to provide cheaper flour. An early co-operative, it was funded by subscription by poor residents finding the price of flour beyond their reach.

On 7th June 1837, the Union steam packet was in the Humber basin, Hull, Preparing to cross the Humber, when it exploded. 3 other ferries were next to it; 23 people died. The engineer was later charged, but not convicted.

On 7th June 1915, Vere Campey Marshall made a statement to police, stating that he witnessed a 1,000 strong crowd outside the premises of Kress and Wagner, 163/5 Spring Bank, throwing stones, and a girl using a hammer to break a window. Police and military were sent to guard the premises. Anti-German feeling was strong during WW1.

May 30th

On 30th May 1778, Frank Slaiter returned to work at Escrick Hall 4 ½ months after breaking his thigh at work. His employer, Beilby Thompson, paid his medical fees, and gave him an allowance of 2/3 his normal wage while he was off sick.

On 30th May 1782, Rev George Lambert and Mr Towers began a journey to London with a ferry crossing of the Humber, which took 3 hours; it took from 11a.m. to the evening to reach Lincoln by coach. They arrived in London about 50 hours after leaving Hull. This was probably typical for the time.

On 30th May 1820, William Bradley died aged 33 of tuberculosis in  Market Weighton. Known as the Yorkshire Giant, he grew to 7’9”. Travelled with shows and fairs, and later charged visitors to his home. Was presented to King George III. (b 10.2.1787)

On 30th May 1859, a Hull Coroner’s Court jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against Isabella Hewson.  On 27.5 she had hanged her son, aged 2, and then gave herself up to police. No evidence of insanity was found on medical examination.

On 30th May 1912, Brigadier Mark Sykes inspected the Yorkshire Catholic Reformatory, Market Weighton, and found lack of discipline, bullying, filth, poor food, lack of fire precautions and drill, and poor medical treatment. Recommended all staff but one be dismissed. The management of the school was changed later that year.

 

Yorks reformatory