12th May

On 12th May 1585, Dr Thomas Vavasour died of diseas in Hull Castle after being imprisoned in damp and overcrowded conditions with the whole of his household for many years. A physician and scholar, he was a prominent Catholic, was excommunicated and arrested. He was buried in Drypool churchyard, which stood within the garrison walls of Hull.

On 12th May 1698, Hull grassman Hugh Stringer was given a contract by the town council to cart away rubbish, clean the streets, and ensure that residents kept the street clean in front of their house.

On 12th May 1855, Sir (William) Alfred Gelder, FRS, FRIBA was born in North Cave. As  an architect, was involved in clearing Hull’s Victorian slums and reconstructing the city, in partnership with City Architect Joseph Hirst. Liberal, Mayor of Hull 1899-1903, later MP for Brigg and Hull alderman. Received the freedom of the city 1930. Died 26.8.41.

On 12th May 1859, Paull fisherman Thomas Marritt drowned whilst fishing in Whitebooth Roads, in the Humber. His body was found in the river between Hessle and Hull in June.

On 12th May 1874, Grace (8) and Lucy (7) Cuthbert of Easington died when their clothing became trapped in the machinery of the family mill, where they were playing.

On 12th May 1903, the Prince and Princess of Wales (later George V & Queen Mary) unveiled a statue to Queen Victoria in Hull; their escort was the first task of the newly created East Riding of Yorkshire Imperial Yeomanry.

On 12th May 1915, an anonymous person wrote a letter addressed to George, at German Pork Shop, Waterworks Street, Hull, warning him that his shop was to be ‘broken up’ because of anti-German feelings as a result of the sinking of the Lusitania. Hohenrein’s Pork Butchers was attacked by a mob.

On 12th May 1945, retired Hull City Architect Joseph Hirst died aged 81 in Selby. Was responsible, with Mayor Alfred Gelder, for the transformation of Hull in the late 19thC, with the creation of Victoria Square, City Hall, and Alfred Gelder St. His designs include the Market Hall, Beverley Road Baths, Carnegie Library, Pickering Almshouses, Castle Hill Hospital. He was involved in planning new council estates in the 1920s. Wrote “The Blockhouses of Hull’ and ‘Armorial Bearings of KuH’. (b24.5.1863 South Milford) Hirst appears to have no memorial in Hull.

On 12th May 2013, Professor George William Gray, CBE, died aged 86. He moved to Hull in 1946 and worked as a laboratory demonstrator at Hull University. Went on to lead the research which resulted in LCD technology. Received many awards, including Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and Kyoto International Gold Medallist. He is commemorated in the George Gray Room in Hull History Centre.

April 28th

On 28th April 1489, Henry Percy, 4thEarl of Northumberland, was lynched at Cocklodge near Thirsk by a rioting mob protesting against high taxes, during the Yorkshire Rebellion. He was buried in a newly built chapel in Beverley Minster.

On 28th April 1825, a bull sperm whale washed up at Tunstall, and was dissected on the beach by Dr James Alderson, before being articulated by Edward Wallis, and put on display to the public at Burton Constable Hall. Herman Melville saw the whale and referred to it in his novel “Moby Dick’. The remains of the skeleton are still on show.

On 28th April 1876, Hull sculptor Thomas Earle died aged 66. A member of the Earle family of stonemasons and later shipbuilders, Thomas made a successful career in London. His works in Hull include the statue of Dr John Alderson (Hull Royal Infirmary), Oceanus (Trinity House), Queen Victoria (Pearson Park), Thomas Ferres (Hull Minster – see below) and Edward I (Guildhall). Awarded Royal Academy Gold Medal 1851.

Thos Ferres by Thos Earle

April 26th

 

john-hotham-1-sized

On 26th April 1642, the Hull Mayor received a letter from King Charles (now in York) demanding admittance to the town, and confirming Sir John Hotham as a traitor, and not to be obeyed.

On 26th April 1796, Capt Metcalfe, of Hull Trinity House, assisted in quelling the second day of riots in Hull. The price of bread was high, and starvation a reality, poor people spending 60-80% of their income on food. A crowd sacked a mill outside town, seized flour and meal, and took goods being landed from Lincolnshire. They attacked market traders and insisted on paying a lower price for goods.  The Riot Act was read; 2 people were jailed.

On 26th April 1828, Matthew Harrison, 40, of Beverley, was hanged at York Castle for horse stealing, with 2 associates.

On 26th April 1867, the Hull whaler Diana returned to port after 353 days away, mostly spent trapped in ice in Frobisher Bay in the Arctic. 10 (or 13) men died of scurvy and dysentery.  Captain  John Gravill is buried in Hull General Cemetery.

 

April 22nd

On 22nd April 1566, Walter Cave was assaulted in his own home in Hull by Ralph Ellerker, his brother James and servants, and Cave brought an action in the Star Chamber. The argument involved Walter Cave accusing Robert Dalton, his brother-in-law and servant of the Ellerkers, of illegally harbouring Catholic priests, and Cave’s refusal to allow Dalton into the house to speak to Dalton’s mother. Ralph Ellerker claimed he acted in defence of his brother, who was unarmed. The outcome of the case is not recorded.

On 22nd April 1642, James Duke of York, the King’s son, aged 9, and the King’s nephew, Prince Rupert of the Rhine, 23, arrived in Hull unannounced, with the country people arriving for market day. They were well looked after, and invited to dinner with Sir John Hotham the following day. portrait on left shows James aged 12

On 22nd April 1893, arson suspected when fires broke out in timber stocks on Hull docks, during a dock strike which saw rioting, police charges and military involvement. The fire covered an area of 8 acres; the Citadel Hotel was destroyed, and total damage was estimated at up to £1million. Kier Hardy asked Parliament why the military had been sent to assist the shipowners. The strike continued into May.

April 7th

john-hotham-1-sized

On 7th April 1615, George Goodgion, senior servant to Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, ordered tenants to cart coals to the big house, which was out of fuel, and to note the names of those who refused. Tenants were required in their leases to do this work, but had to fit it in with their own farming work.

On 7th April 1643, Sir John Hotham wrote several letters to people on the Parliament side; the post for London was captured, and his letters published by the Royalists at Oxford, revealing his double-dealing.

On 7th April 1787, John Morrit, 34, was hanged at York for murdering John Argyle, aka Roundell, of Howden.

On 7th April 1810, Mr William Iveson, Steward to Francis Constable of Burton Constable, proposesd to Hull Trinity House to erect a lifeboat house on Spurn Point, provide 12 crew from Kilnsea, and open a tavern to create an income for the boat’s master.

On 7th April 1828, Joseph Robinson Pease, JP, made his first committal as JP in Cottingham, of a man who disobeyed an Order of Bastardy, i.e. he was jailed for refusing to pay maintenance for an illegitimate child.

On 7th April 1893, a rioting Hull mob destroyed 37 bags of carrots being taken on rullies to the docks, and used them as missiles to attack the police.

On 7th April 1943, pupils at Paull Primary School escaped unhurt when a barrage balloon escaped its mooring in the Humber, and exploded, setting fire to the school building.

 

March 21st

The spring equinox was the original date for April Fool’s day. Medieval rituals made fun of church figures, until they were outlawed in the 16thcentury. The date changed to April 1st, and the foolery lost its religious focus. Or have I just fooled you?

On 21st March 1863, Sir Tatton Sykes died at Sledmere aged 91. 4thbaronet, landowner, stock breeder and racehorse owner. He rode his own horse Hudibras at Malton in 1805, and won. 3,000 people attended his funeral. He continued to wear 18th Century dress all his life. (b Wheldrake 1772)

On 21st March 1955, Philip Larkin took up the post of Librarian at Hull University. photo shows part of the Larkin Trail.

Larkin trail Spurn

February 4th

On 4th February 1516, John Holme, labourer, of Ottringham, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John ‘for divers felonies’.

On 4th February 1634, William Kitching, 39, of Little Driffield, and 9 other men, were hanged at York for rioting at Hull about corn, for demolishing the dwellinghouse of Edward Cooper, and for stealing clothes. None of those convicted were from Hull.

On 4th February 1783, Hull Trinity House accepted the proposal of Mr Blaydes of Hull to build a yacht for £500; they used the yacht Humber for 23 years.

On 4th February 1809, Ebenezer Bettison and 2 others, of Hull, drowned during a storm when going in a boat to secure a lighter which appeared to be in danger.

On 4th February 1821, Thomas Wilkinson Wallis was born in Hull. The son of a cabinet maker, he became a wood carver. He was a pprenticed to Thos Ward in Waterworks St, Hull, and trained at the Mechanics Institute. His work can be found in the Victoria & Albert Museum, London. photo shows one of his carvings

On 4th February 1900, Sir Leo Schultz (Joseph Leopold Schultz) was born in Hull. He was  the Leader of Hull City Council from 1945-79. Was awarded the OBE in 1946 for war work, including as an air raid warden, and for his campaign to provide all households with a bomb shelter. He was knighted in 1966 for services to local government. Honorary Doctor of Law Hull University 1979. d 1991. photo above

On 4th February 1968, Hull trawler Ross Cleveland capsized and sank with all but 1 of the 20 crew. An enquiry concluded the ship was unable to cope with ice build-up. The wreckage was located in 2002.

St Andrews Dock memorial