December 23rd

On 23rd December 1226, Robert ‘Furfan’ de Ros, of Roos, died, aged about 54. 1stLord of Helmsley, son-in-law of the Scottish king William the Lion, a Knight Templar and one of the barons enforcing the Magna Carta. His tomb is in the Temple church, London.

On 23rd December 1510, Peter Swake and Roland Dale of Catton claimed sanctuary at the church of St Cuthbert, Durham, as accessories to homicide. About 25.11.1510, they were present when Richard Horsley of Catton was taken from his mother’s house in Catton to a field, where he received several wounds, from which he died about a month later. They feared being  indicted as accessories. On 5.7.1511, another Catton man, William Ratcliff, entered the sanctuary with the same story, although he had taken sanctuary in Beverley for the homicide the previous year.

On 23rd December 1535, Austin Tennant of Hull claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for homicide and felony (details not recorded).  On the same day, the sanctuary received another 4 fugitives, from Leeds, Wakefield, and Thornton and Tealby in Lincs, 3 for felony and 1 for debt.

On 23rd December 1640, Sir John Lister died in Hull, aged 53. He left land at Thorngumbald to provide income for the poor, and money to set up the almshouses known as Lister’s Hospital. Twice Mayor of Hull, and MP, he built the house now known as Wilberforce House. He is commemorated in Holy Trinity church, where he also left money for repairs.

On 23rd December 1689, Johannes Frederick Bellow, a Danish trooper, was executed in Beverley Market Place for killing fellow soldier Daniel Straker, in a duel. Both are buried in St Mary’s churchyard.

On 23rd December 1732, a hurricane removed the roof and steeple of Hornsea church, destroyed 24 houses and overturned a windmill, and interrupted the parish clerk in the act of concealing smuggled goods in the crypt of the church.

danish soldiers st mary's.JPG

September 7th

On 7th September 1316, King Edward II issued orders to Beverley to arm the whole male population between ages 16 and 60 against the Scottish threat.

On 7th September 1643, Sir John Hotham was taken from the Tower of London to Parliament to be formally ejected from his seat as MP for Yorkshire.

On 7th September 1646, Sir Michael Wharton of Beverley, considered a Royalist (delinquent) for attending a meeting at Heworth Moor addressed by the King, was fined £4,000 in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament. His fine was reduced in 1652. photo shows Warton’s Hospital, Keldgate, Beverley.Warton's Hospital.JPG

On 7th September 1854, Robert Isaac Wilberforce, vicar of Burton Agnes and Archdeacon of the East Riding, resigned his Church of England posts and joined the Catholic Church.  Robert was the second son of William Wilberforce. Of William Wilberforce’s 4 sons, 3 converted to Catholicism and Samuel Wilberforce Bishop of Oxford, then Winchester, was an extreme Anglo-Catholic.

On 7th September 1866, Bull lightship in the Humber was struck by the Prussian barque Emma Johanna and damaged, holed below the water-line. It was taken to Victoria Dock, Hull for repairs by Hull Trinity House.

August 30th

 

 

Brid Priory churchOn 30th August 1510, Bridlington tanner Henry Braderig claimed sanctuary at the church of St Cuthbert, Durham, for killing Robert Lelome in the grounds of Bridlington Abbey. With 2 other tanners, Roland Hall and Robert Yong, he had struck Lelome with a dagger, and he died 2 weeks later. The attack happened 11 months earlier, in September.   photo shows Bridlington Abbey church today

On 30th August 1767, James Savage was born in Howden.  Journalist, printer and bookseller, librarian, antiquarian, and newspaper editor. Wrote ‘A History of Howden Church’ 1799 and a history of Wressle in 1805, and a number of other books. (Died  Taunton 19.3.1845). (Suggestion, unverified, that he was Howden town clerk, was accused of claiming excessive expenses, and left Howden 1801 with the parish records, refusing to return them until the town paid him monies due; the books were not recovered).

On 30th August 1854, Robert Wilberforce, rector of Burton Agnes and Archdeacon of the East Riding, resigned after leading a doctrinal controversy which raged in the Hull newspapers for many weeks. Shortly after this, he joined the Catholic church.  He died before he could be ordained. He was a son of William Wilberforce.

On 30th August 1913, Elizabeth Barr, 25, was shot at Watton by former partner and the father of her child, Henry Moore of Kelk, who then shot himself. A letter from Moore to his father indicates his action was premeditated. Barr died 2 days later, and Moore the following week. A coroner’s jury found Barr’s death was due to wilful murder.

On 30th August 1940, Abdo Nassa, age 50, fireman, died by enemy action whilst a merchant seaman in Atlantic convoy, on board SS Chelsea of Hull.

August 24th

On 24th August 1399, a schism within the church led to controversy about the post of Meaux Abbot Thomas Burton, and rather than involve the abbey in the costs of litigation, he retired and wrote “The Meaux Chronicle’, the history of the abbey.

On 24th August 1662, on Black Bartholomew’s Day, also known as the Great Ejection, Josiah Holdsworth, curate of Sutton-on-Hull, was dismissed for refusing to conform to the Book of Common Prayer, along with 2,000 other Puritan ministers across the country.  They included Anthony Stephenson at Roos, who stayed in the village as physician, and Stephen Arlush of Howden, who continued to preach in a private house as a Congregationalist, also John Ryther of North Ferriby, who spent some years in prison for illegal preaching. And Mr Robinson at Cottingham, Mr Luddington at Sculcoates, Mr Thos Micklethwaite at Cherry Burton.

On 24th August 1759, William Wilberforce was born in High Street, Hull. The Parliamentary champion of the abolition of slavery, he collaborated for 50 years with Thomas Clarkson. MP for Yorkshire 1812-1825. Buried in Westminster Abbey. (d 29.71833)

On 24th August 1789, the Preston house and shop of William Sanderson were broken into by James Hartley of Manchester. Hartley was hanged at York Castle on 17.4.1790.

On 24th August 1921, an R38 airship exploded and crashed into the Humber on its last trial flight; 44 members of the crew died. Debris narrowly missed sightseers on Victoria Pier, Hull. photo shows wreckage

On 24th August 1943, Flight Officer Charles Keirl, 23, and 13 other airmen died when 2 Halifax bombers of 78 Squadron collided in fog; one air gunner survived. Keirl is buried in Queensgate Cemetery, Beverley. There is a memorial at Hull Bridge.

 

R38wreckage1

August 9th

Bishop's Palace, Howden

On 9th August 1260, Walter of Kirkham, Bishop of Durham, died at the Bishop’s Palace, Howden. His body was taken to Durham for burial but his viscera were buried in the church. photo shows what remains of Bishop’s Palace.

On 9th August 1516, Sir Ralph Ellerker of Risby confessed to Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, Archbishop of York, that he ordered his servants Henry Norham and Roberte Hunt to kidnap George Millet, keeper of Beverley Parks, and imprison him in Cottingham Park so that he could hunt on the Archbishop’s land. Pleading poverty, he was bound over in the sum of £200.

On 9th August 1769, John Burrill of Skipsea assaulted John Warcup with swords, staves, knives and clubs so that his life was threatened and ‘other wrongs’. Burrill was indicted in September, found guilty on 24.4.1770, and sentenced 2.10.1770 to a fine of £20 and to remain in gaol until the fine was paid.

On 9th August 1785, Rev George Lambert went to see a 24 foot whale killed and displayed at South End, Hull (near modern pier); described by sailors as a young bottlenecked grampus.

On 9th August 1859, Hansard records the 29.4.1859 election in Beverley void; Ralph Walters was declared ‘not a Burgess to serve in this present Parliament for the Borough of Beverley’ and Henry Edwards was declared MP in his place. Joseph Robinson Pease in his diary called Walters ‘an adventurer, arriving 3 days previously’, ‘by open bribery …. carried the day.’

On 9th August 1902, William Day Keyworth junior, sculptor, died aged 59 in Spring Bank, Hull. He produced many statues of civic dignitaries, including Andrew Marvell, Anthony Bannister and William Wilberforce (now outside Wilberforce House). Shot himself in the head at his home, but left no suicide note.

On the same day, Nafferton villagers were celebrating King Edward VII’s coronation with, among other events, a ‘comic’ cricket match, gentlemen vs ladies, which the ladies won. The score is not recorded.

On 9th August 1915, 17 Goole residents, mostly women and children, were killed by a Zeppelin raid on the town and docks.

On 9th August 1916, a Zeppelin raid on Anlaby Road, Hull,  killed John Broadley aged 3 and at least 7 other residents, and injured about 20. 2 people died of shock. Rev A.W. Carter, Assistant Priest of Newington Church, was badly hurt.

 

August 1st

On 1st August 1506, William Ryplay, labourer, of Leconfield, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 1st August 1639, Robert Skelton, 32, of Hull, was hanged at York Castle for forging a will belonging to Thomas Bell of Hull.

On 1st August 1648, Hull Recorder Francis Thorpe wrote to the Mayor concerning the shipment of pistols to the town, and about the case of Bacchus, a delinquent (i.e. a supporter of the Royalist cause in the Civil War).

On 1st August 1670, Mrs Mary Barnard of Barmston had been ordered to do work to the drain called Gallow Clow (on Myton Carr, near the road to Anlaby) on land which she owned, and had failed to carry it out; a jury under the Commissioner of Sewers gave notice of their intention to view the drain or creek.

On 1st August 1834, Richard Bethell MP laid the foundation stone for William Wilberforce’s statue on Monument Bridge, Hull, on the same day as the Slavery Abolition Act came into force.

On 1st August 1873, the Fisk Jubilee Singers arrived in Hull and visited the Wilberforce monument on the anniversary of the Abolition of Slavery Act. They performed several times, and were so popular they returned to Hull twice more before returning to the US August 1874. They were on a European tour, including singing for Queen Victoria, to raise money for the Fisk University for freed slaves. Several of the singers were born slaves.

 

Wilberforce memorial plinth

 

July 11th

On 11th July 1843, Archdeacon Wilberforce preached the last ever sermon in St Faith’s church, Leven, before it was demolished, leaving only the chancel, which was itself demolished in 1882.

On 11th July 1941, Special Constable George Brignall Marshall, aged 54, was killed in Hull by enemy action whilst on duty with East Riding of Yorkshire Constabulary during an air raid. Damage north of Paragon station and a major fire at Blundell Spence factory. 20 other people died, and 46 were seriously injured.

St Faith Leven