March 10th

Holy Trinity

On 10th March 1425, Hull Holy Trinity Church, was consecrated; building began in 1291 and was interrupted by the Black Death.

On 10th March 1447, Henry VI issued a charter enlarging the county of Hull to include Hessle, North Ferriby, Swanland, West Ella, Kirk Ella, Tranby, Willerby, Wolfreton, Anlaby, the site of Haltemprice Priory and Derringham Dike.

On 10th March 1623, George Tummond, butcher, of Patrington, was found dying at sunrise in Winestead, after starting to walk home from the alehouse in Ottringham. Holderness was notorious for its floods.

On 10th March 1800, George Hudson, the “Railway King’, was born in Howsham.  He  made a great business and political career from sharp practice and bribery (was MP for Sunderland, and Lord Mayor of York). He became hugely rich, but was disgraced, and imprisoned for debt, though released when his debts were paid by public subscription. In 1845, he bought the Londesborough Estate for £470,000. D14.12.1871

On 10th March 1823, John Bacchus Dykes was born in Hull. By the age of 10, was assistant organist at St John’s Church, Myton. Became a vicar, and composed over 300 hymn tunes, including ‘Eternal Father, Strong to Save’ and ‘We plough the fields and scatter’. (d 22.1.1876)

On 10th March 1921, Mr J.H. Tate proposed a motion at Hornsea Golf Club that ’Old Jack be shot’! It is assumed Old Jack was the horse used to pull mowers and rollers on the course.

On 10th March 1954, Alex May, master of the tug Fenman, died in hospital after the tug was overrun by the ship she was towing, the Rudolf, and sank, on the way into Hull’s Alexandra Dock. 2 of the crew were swept away. There was 1 survivor.

March 9th

Trinity House

On 9th March 1767, Beverley Coroner’s Court jury found  (James?) Brown, aged 30, guilty of poisoning his wife, aged 45 and of independent means. Brown appears to have escaped to London, but was arrested and found guilty, his sentence commuted to 7 years’ transportation.

On 9th March 1801, at the request of the Admiralty, Hull Trinity House sent 12 Hull men as North Sea pilots to support the naval force at Yarmouth preparing to attack Copenhagen.

On 9th March 1858, servant Sarah West was overtaken by a severe snowstorm at Newbald Wold whilst returning from a visit to her parents in Market Weighton; she was under a snowdrift for 2 days, but was discovered by a shepherd and nursed back to health.

On 9th March 1984, Christopher Laverack, aged 9, of Anlaby, disappeared from his sister’s home, and his body was found in Beverley Beck 2 days later. It was not until 2012 that the murder enquiry was closed, when police identified his uncle, Melvyn Read, as the killer. Read had died in 2008.

January 28th

On 28th January 1450, William de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, was arrested and imprisoned for treason. King Henry VI saved him from execution and banished him for 5 years. On his way to Calais, he was captured and reportedly had his head cut off with a rusty sword.

On 28th January 1515, William Jakson of Belby, near Howden, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of John (rest of name blank in the register).

On 28th January 1525, Robert Smyth, husbandman of Anlaby, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of Robert Ekopp alias Hikkopp.

On 28th January 1700, Abraham de la Pryme, curate of Holy Trinity, Hull, reported of Swine that: ‘the town has formerly been very large and handsome, … though it is very mean and inconsiderable, nobody inhabiting the same but a few country clowns’.

On 28th January 1829, William Hurr of Roos was admitted to the Sculcoates Refuge for Pauper Lunatics; on 21 July that year his funeral is recorded.

minster - frith stool.JPG

September 17th

On 17th September 1523, Hull widow Dame Joan Thurscross in her will left £30 for new vestments for St Mary’s church, £35 to hire a priest for seven years to sing for her soul, the souls of her three husbands, of her parents, and of her son, £4 to the building works at the White Friars’, £20 for mending the causeway between Beverley and Anlaby, thirteen white gowns for thirteen poor women, and silver for Hull Charterhouse.

On 17th September 1584, Peter Copley, clothier, was stripped of his status as burgess of Hull and disenfranchised, as a penalty for dyeing the clothes of people from outside the town and bartering the goods of ‘strangers’ as though they were his own. As he was ill at the time, he was not informed of this until he recovered.

On 17th September 1679, Rev Thomas Sedgwick died, aged 58. Puritan theologian and Vicar of St Giles, Marfleet between 1639 and 1672, he is commemorated with a memorial in the church, for the unusual feat of surviving in his post through the Civil War and Reformation.  photos show memorial and translation

On 17th September 1864, 3 residents of Hessle Road, Hull aboard the Humber ferry were gored when a bull being carried across broke loose and ran amok.

September 9th

On 9th September 1513, Marmaduke Constable, of Flamborough was knighted for his role in the Battleof Flodden Field, and a letter of thanks from Henry VIII is displayed in Wassand Hall. Ralph Ellerker, senior of Risby and his son Ralph were also both knighted. This causes some confusion in the historical record, as there were 2 Sir Ralph Ellerkers alive at the same time.

On 9th September 1643, Rev James Sibree reported that on Sunday he had preached twice, visited the cemetery 3 times, and interred 43 bodies of his fellow citizens. During the cholera outbreak, many church services were held outdoors in the Market Place, by ministers of different denominations, and attended by more than 3,000 people. photo shows Cholera Memorial in Western Geneeral Cemetery.

On 9th September 1878, George Carr, aged 45 and Joseph Carr, aged 26, accidentally drowned in Hornsea.

On 9th September 1956, Captain Erik Ohsman, and Chief Steward V. Stenros, of SS Lona, were rescued by firemen when they were found unconscious after fire was discoveredon their Swedish ship, loaded with over 3k tons of pit props. Both recovered. The fire, which started in the engine room, spread to the cargo, and after several hours the ship had to be scuttled in the dock to prevent greater damage. She was raised on 11 October and repaired. Cholera memorial

September 4th

On 4th September 1303, Sir Ralph de Heengham and a jury of 12 men held an inquiry into ownership of land in Hull and Myton, west to Ferriby, and of a highway to and through Anlaby to Ferriby.

On 4th September 1650, Ann Hudson of Skipsea was tried as a witch at York Assizes, and evidence was given to the court by Dynah Hunmansby and Alice Stevenson that her victim, Susannah Keld, had been bewitched and very ill until she had scratched Ann Hudson and drawn blood, when she began to recover. The events had happened 12 years previously. The surviving records do not say whether Ann Hudson was convicted and sentenced.

On 4th September 1709, the congregation of Cottingham church gave 3s6d in a collection for the Market Rasen fire, Lincolnshire. A collection in the dissenters’ meeting place raised 4s 6d.

August 1st

On 1st August 1506, William Ryplay, labourer, of Leconfield, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 1st August 1639, Robert Skelton, 32, of Hull, was hanged at York Castle for forging a will belonging to Thomas Bell of Hull.

On 1st August 1648, Hull Recorder Francis Thorpe wrote to the Mayor concerning the shipment of pistols to the town, and about the case of Bacchus, a delinquent (i.e. a supporter of the Royalist cause in the Civil War).

On 1st August 1670, Mrs Mary Barnard of Barmston had been ordered to do work to the drain called Gallow Clow (on Myton Carr, near the road to Anlaby) on land which she owned, and had failed to carry it out; a jury under the Commissioner of Sewers gave notice of their intention to view the drain or creek.

On 1st August 1834, Richard Bethell MP laid the foundation stone for William Wilberforce’s statue on Monument Bridge, Hull, on the same day as the Slavery Abolition Act came into force.

On 1st August 1873, the Fisk Jubilee Singers arrived in Hull and visited the Wilberforce monument on the anniversary of the Abolition of Slavery Act. They performed several times, and were so popular they returned to Hull twice more before returning to the US August 1874. They were on a European tour, including singing for Queen Victoria, to raise money for the Fisk University for freed slaves. Several of the singers were born slaves.

 

Wilberforce memorial plinth