December 17th

On 17th December 1216, William de Forz was given as a hostage with his mother Aveline to the new King Henry III when his father, William de Forz II, count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness, supported the barons. Presumably this was to assure the king of his loyalty, as he had been a supporter of King John.

On 17th December 1965, North Sea Ferries began operating a ferry service from Hull to Rotterdam, for freight vehicles and private cars. MV Norwave’s maiden voyage saw a force 10 gale, which caused some trailers to break free of their shackles, but damage was minimal. The sister ship Norwind joined the service in March 1966.

Norwave

December 16th

On 16th December 1512, William Crag of Cave claimed sanctuary at the church of St Cuthbert, Durham, for ‘asportation’; along with others, he had stolen 25 horses and mares, near Cave; in addition, in a certain park near Airton by York, he stole 3 other horses.

On 16th December 1586, the Earl of Huntingdon, on behalf of the Council in the North, wrote to the Hull Corporation to ask them to prevent merchants profiteering from the corn shortage by purchasing stocks for poor relief at a reasonable rate.

On 16th December 1645, Hull draper Robert Cartwright was fined £47 as a former Captain in the Royalist army (a ‘delinquent’) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament.

On 16th December 1689, a number of Danish soldiers were in William of Orange’s army, and 2 of them quarrelled and settled their dispute by a sword duel at Beverley. The survivor was beheaded in Saturday Market. (see 23.12)

On 16th December 1929, the R100 airship, the largest airship ever designed, made by a team led by Sir Barnes Neville Wallis, and including novelist Neville Shute Norway, took its maiden voyage from Spaldington Air Station.

On 16th December 2010, Easington tithe barn was offered for sale at an auction with a guide price of £125,000 and failed to sell. The 14thC building is the last remaining tithe barn in the county, and a Grade II listed building.

Easington tithe barn

December 3rd

grammar school

 

On 3rd December 1611, William Gee died in Bishop Burton, aged 63.  MP for Hull and a generous benefactor, he left more than £1,000 in bequests to the poor. Gave most of the cost of the new Grammar School. (baptised 16.9.1565)

On 3rd December 1614, Sir John Sheffield, his brothers Edmund and Philip all drowned, with their servants, when the Whitgift ferry across the River Ouse was upset by an unruly horse.

On 3rd December 1805, Abraham Turner, former pupil of Hull Trinity House School, wrote to the House with a report of the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he had been wounded, on board HMS Africa.

November 26th

On 26th November 1319, Geoffrey Fitz Hugh and John de Wetewang conveyed property in Lyle Street (Mytongate), Hull,  to Hugh and Ellen Le Taverner.

On 26th November 1525, Richard Haton, gentleman, from Hayton, claimed sanctuary in St Mary’s Church, Hertford, and confessed to the coroner  that in October he had broken into a parish church in Essex and stolen a silver chalice; and in January he had burgled a house in Bucks and stolen jewellery and money. He abjured, i.e. renounced his country, and left through the port of Southampton.

On 26th November 1597, Sir Francis Barrington, Lord of the Manor of Cottingham (and uncle by marriage of Oliver Cromwell) wrote objecting to Hull Corporation’s drainage plan to move surplus water through his clough at Cottingham, which he said would risk flooding in the area.

On 26th November 1831, Joseph Robinson Pease, JP, spent his third consecutive day swearing in Special Constables to deal with anticipated riots; various sources say between 800 and 2,000 were sworn. James Acland had formed the Hull Political Union, and held meetings critical of the Hull Corporation, and said the aldermen were of out of touch and did not live in the town.

On 26th November 1847, Pocklington Canal Company agreed, at the Feathers Hotel, Pocklington, to sell the canal to the York & North Midland Railway, which also purchased the Market Weighton and Leven Canals. The canal had never been a financial success, and the railway company subsequently raised canal tolls so as to drive freight traffic onto the trains.

Pocklington canal
Melbourne lock

November 25th

On 25th November 1641, Nicholas Pearson, parish clerk at St Mary’s Beverley, wrote this rhyme in the parish register, as a reminder of the dates when the Catholic church traditions forbade the celebration of marriage: ‘When Advent comes do thou refrain till Hillary set ye free again. Next Septuagissima saith ye nay But when Low Sunday comes thou may. Yet at Rogation thou must tarry Till Trinity shall bid ye marry.’ However, Pearson was a Puritan, showing perhaps that many traditions continued in the Church of England.

On 25th November 1818, Hull Trinity House started a fund to build cottages for the Spurn lifeboat crew, to help the lifeboat get under way more quickly after a call. £800 was raised.

On 25th November 1857 (or 1851) died when the steam packet Empress collided with the Ouse ferry in the dark at Whitgift. 3 passengers from Sheffield also died.  Verdict of accidental drowning by the carelessness of the ferrymen. photo –  Whitgift

Whitgift

November 18th

On 18th November 1620, the son of Thomas Peirson of Shipton (now Shiptonthorpe) hoped for a post in the kitchen at Londesborough House, the seat of Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland. Either he was not suitable, or there was no post available. He was given 12d costs as compensation. Posts were usually filled by personal recommendation, often from families who had worked in the house in the past.

On 18th November 1910, Benjamin Bolton, aged 48, of 5 Suffolk Terrace, Hornsea, died after falling from a moving train near Brough.  A prominent Hornsea citizen, member of the Conservative Party and member of Hornsea Music Union, he played cricket for Hull, Hornsea & Yorkshire and bowled out W G Grace. The inquest returned a verdict of accidental death. (b23.9.1862 Cottingham)

On 18th November 1938, Sir Henry Joseph Wood, founder of the Proms, resigned as conductor of the Hull Philharmonic Society after 15 years. The committee considered Sir Malcolm Sargent as his replacement, but he was not available. Basil Cameron was engaged. photo shows the orchestra in Hull City Hall

hull-philharmonic-orchestra-lst198215

October 31st

On 31st October 1640, the gentry of Cottingham, Swanland and other villages petitioned Sir John Conyers to remove his regiment to other quarters, as they were eating up all their cattle fodder and supplies, and many other ‘insupportable damages and dangers’. Many troops had already been removed from Hull into the surrounding villages for similar reasons. The petition was not successful, although the troops did look for other quarters.

On 31st October 1646, Sir Robert Hildyard of Patrington was fined £610 as a Royalist (delinquent) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament. He was a member of the King’s Privy Council.

On the same day, Michael Wharton of Beverley was fined £1,600 for the same reason. He had been a captain in the Royalist army.

On 31st October 1793, John Woodhead, mason, was killed at work on the building site of the Neptune Inn, Whitefriargate. Hull Trinity House gave his widow a gratuity of £5 5s.

On 31st October 1833, the Humber pilots’ work for that day included taking men from Trinity House to relay the Bull buoy.

On 31st October 1929, George Jackson Bentham died suddenly, while boarding a train home, in the company of a young lady not his wife. Hull city councillor, JP, and MP for Gainsborough, he was the son of the founder of Wm Jackson & Son, and the company’s managing director. He changed his name by deed poll to that of his Liberal hero, Jeremy Bentham.

 

Pilot Office

October 23rd

On 23rd October 1667, Richard Sterne, Archbishop of York, excommunicated a number of people, both male and female, at Beverley, and required them to make public penances, for crimes including adultery, fornication, and incest.

On 23rd October 1908, Wm Jackson & Son Ltd, Hull grocers & bakers, bought the company’s first motor vehicle (having previously used only horse-drawn transport and hand carts); by 1933 they had a fleet of 30 motor vehicles.

On 23rd October 1909, Rev Canon Joseph Malet Lambert, Hull philanthropist  and his wife Rose were charged at Dollgellau Magistrates Court, while at their holiday home in Barmouth, with cruelty against Mary Rose Inman, 11 years, whom they had adopted to save her from the workhouse and to train for domestic service. The girl had been starved (weighed 48lb) and beaten, and hidden from visitors. It appears that Mrs Lambert was convicted and sentenced. photo shows the school named after the Canon.

Malet_lambert

 

October 22nd

On 22nd October 1517, John Cook, yeoman of Sewerby, claimed sanctuary after assaulting labourer Thomas Stowpes and fled to Flambrough church.  This was not a registered place of sanctuary, but was called ‘taking church’. At a Coroner’s inquest at Sewerby on 5.11.1517, the jurors reported that Cook assaulted Stowpes on 22 Oct, giving him a wound from which he died 3 days later.

On 22nd October 1611, Lady Margaret Clifford, daughter of the Earl of Cumberland and Thomas Wentworth, future baronet, were married at All Saints, Londesborough. The Earl’s finances were not healthy, due to a protracted legal dispute with Lady Anne Clifford over his inheritance, so the celebrations were low-key, with only 40 in attendance, and a simple dinner of pasties, mince pies and turkey, a speciality of the estate. The artist Augustine Harrison was present, so that the Earl could present his 2 daughters with identical portraits of himself. photo shows Londesbrough church

On 22nd October 1882, William Butler, 16, 4thhand, was lost overboard from Hull trawler Sportsman in the North Sea.

On 22nd October 1972, the new Queen Elizabeth Dock container terminal was opened.

 

Londesborough

 

October 21st

On 21st October 1823, Mr Gleadow, commander of the customs cutter Bee, seized 31,324 barrels of contraband, including 250 lbs of tea, 720 lbs of tobacco, and 976 gallons of spirits, mostly gin, from the Lunatic asylum, Brandesburton Moor.

On 21st October 1904, the Gamecock trawler fleet from Hull was fired on by the Russian Baltic fleet, claiming they mistook them for the Japanese Navy. The trawler Crane was sunk and her captain and second mate killed; 30 others were injured. There is a memorial statue to the ‘Russian Outrage’ at the corner of Boulevard/Hessle Road.

On 21st October 1905, Ellen Borrill, of William’s Terrace, Hull, was murdered at Danthorpe by Peter Williams, her partner. He cut her throat in a field, walked to Burton Pidsea, and then gave himself up to the police at Roos. He claimed she had tried to kill herself, and asked him to finish her off. On 2nd December, Williams was sentenced to death, but was reprieved.

On 21st October 1921, Jim Graham and Cam Connor, out of work shipwrights from South Shields, bought a 14-seater Model T. Ford and set up Easington’s first bus service, just 2 years after East Yorkshire’s first bus service was set up in Elloughton by E.J. Lee, also using a 14-seater Model T.

Russian Outrage