April 8th

King Henry V

On 8th April 1421, King Henry V presided over state business while at Howden, probably at the Bishop’s Palace.

On 8th April 1586, Sir Christopher Hilyarde, William Pailer and Hugh Bethell supervised an inquiry into concealed lands and premises in Hull. Amongst numerous premises found concealed were the “Old Schoolhouse’, a tenement occupied by the schoolmaster and the new schoolhouse.

On 8th April 1586, Sir Francis Walsingham, principal secretary to Elizabeth I, wrote to the Hull Mayor recommending Dr Hudson of York for the post of assessor in the Hull Admiralty Court. He seems to have got the job.

 

March 17th

Kiplingcotes

On 17th March 1646, Henry Hildyard of Winestead was fined £4,660 as a Royalist (a ‘delinquent’) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament. (He had been a  Colonel of the trained bands which formed King Charles’ bodyguard for about 2 weeks in 1642, then retired to Surrey for the rest of the war). The fine was later reduced by half in payment for Hull Manor House which had belonged to him and which Parliament had given to the town of Hull.

On 17th March 1930, Judith Patricia (Pat) Albeck was born in Hull to Polish migrant parents. She was an award-winning designer of textiles and ceramics, known for her work for the National Trust. She is commemorated in Hull with a cream plaque. (d 2.9.2017)

On 17th March 1945, a cinema queue outside the Savoy Cinema, Holderness Road, Hull (the site is now Boyes store) was bombed and strafed; 12 people were killed, 22 wounded.

On 17th March 1966, Barbara Foster fFailed to win the Kiplingcotes Derby when her horse collapsed and died.

Pat Albeck

 

March 4th

On 4th March 1666, Edward Grey, Mayor of Beverley, and Robert Hildyard were in correspondence with the Mayor of Hull about plague in North Frodingham and the precautions taken in Beverley against infection; a week later, they sent a certificate that North Frodingham was clear of infection.

On 4th March 1752, Elizabeth Plaxton paid for 4 brass chandeliers to be installed in the choir of Holy Trinity, Hull, at a cost of £100.

On 4th March 1791, Sarah Metcalfe, originally of Hull, died in Humbleton aged 45. No cause of death is given; she was the mother of 13 children, 4 of which died in their infancy.

On 4th March 1903, Dorothy Mackaill was born in Newstead Street, Hull. She became a stage actor in London and Paris before moving to Broadway and, in 1920, making her first film. In 1932 she starred with Humphrey Bogart in “Love Affair’, and retired 5 years later, though she did return to acting on TV. She died aged 87 (12.8.1990)

On 4th March 1908, Cornelius O’Kelly, PC 249, later Olympic gold medallist, was one of 4 police fire officers injured when a 20ft wall collapsed during a fire at Frank Soulsby’s saw mill, Thomas Street, Hull. Unable to work for 27 days, he received £5 15s8d from his employer’s liability assurance. (and see 3.11)

dorothy-mackaill

 

February 17th

On 17th February 1646, Christopher Hildyard of Winestead was fined £109 as a former Lieut – Col in the Royalist army (a ‘delinquent’) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament.

On 17th February 1803, Burnett’s Daily Shipping List recorded that no ships arrived or departed in Hull on that day (apart from the ferry to Barton).

On 17th February 1821, Robert Sharp junior, an unemployed bricklayer’s labourer from Hull, gave evidence in the hearing of a petition in the House of Commons. Colonel John Baillie, MP for Hedon, was accused of bribery and corruption in the 1820 election. Sharp claimed to have spent the 2 weeks prior to election day at the Charles Saunders Inn (now the Shakespeare), eating and drinking at the expense of the candidate and finally, on election day, receiving 2 guineas from James Iveson, Baillie’s agent, for making himself ‘generally useful’.  William Mason also gave evidence of being offered 12 guineas by James Iveson, political agent for Col John Baillie, if he would vote for him. Baillie’s election was confirmed.

On 17th February 1961, Angela Eagle, MP and Maria Eagle MP were born in Bridlington. The Labour MPs are the first set of twins to sit in the House of Commons.

Eagle MPs copy

 

 

January 19th

 

Pilgr Grace

On 19th January 1537, Sir Francis Bigod was attacked by Ellerker’s men in Beverley, and most of his men were captured. After failing to capture Scarborough, he had gathered more followers at Bainton, but heard that John Hallam had failed to capture Hull. Bigod escaped to the north, and was eventually captured in March. Both Bigod and Hallam were executed.

On 19th January 1684, Sir Robert Hilyard, knight & Baron of Patrington, gave his son Capt Robert Hilyard ‘2 whole pues or closets, which were positioned in the South Transept’.

On 19th January 1970, Alan Plater oversaw the first production at the new theatre in Spring Street of his own play ‘Don’t Build a Bridge, Drain the River’, with music by Mike Chapman and Mike Waterson. The Humberside Arts Centre later became Humberside Theatre, and then Hull Truck Theatre. see photo

On 19th January 1979, William Rodgers, Secretary of State for Transport, reported in the House of Commons that as the result of an industrial dispute in the road haulage industry, there was no movement of grain or animal feed out of Hull docks. The importance of Hull was stressed, as other parts of the country depended on it to deliver goods.

On 19th January 2014, the Environment Agency closed Sutton Lock on the River Derwent to navigation due to safety concerns. The lock had been reconstructed in 1972 to enable pleasure craft to travel up to Stamford Bridge and give access to the Pocklington Canal. There seemed to be uncertainty as to who owned the gates and equipment.

Spring St theatre

October 31st

On 31st October 1640, the gentry of Cottingham, Swanland and other villages petitioned Sir John Conyers to remove his regiment to other quarters, as they were eating up all their cattle fodder and supplies, and many other ‘insupportable damages and dangers’. Many troops had already been removed from Hull into the surrounding villages for similar reasons. The petition was not successful, although the troops did look for other quarters.

On 31st October 1646, Sir Robert Hildyard of Patrington was fined £610 as a Royalist (delinquent) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament. He was a member of the King’s Privy Council.

On the same day, Michael Wharton of Beverley was fined £1,600 for the same reason. He had been a captain in the Royalist army.

On 31st October 1793, John Woodhead, mason, was killed at work on the building site of the Neptune Inn, Whitefriargate. Hull Trinity House gave his widow a gratuity of £5 5s.

On 31st October 1833, the Humber pilots’ work for that day included taking men from Trinity House to relay the Bull buoy.

On 31st October 1929, George Jackson Bentham died suddenly, while boarding a train home, in the company of a young lady not his wife. Hull city councillor, JP, and MP for Gainsborough, he was the son of the founder of Wm Jackson & Son, and the company’s managing director. He changed his name by deed poll to that of his Liberal hero, Jeremy Bentham.

 

Pilot Office

October 2nd

On 2nd October 1200, King John gave permission for an annual fair at Howden lasting a week; by the 19th Century it had become the biggest horse fair in England, but by 2007 Howden Fair had reduced to a 1-day event.

On 2nd October 1504, Thomas Henrison, husbandman of Skipsea, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 2nd October 1518, Thomas Weston, a ‘singingman’, from Snaith, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 2nd October 1541, the Privy Council of England sat in Hull.

On 2nd October 1658, Capt Robert Hildyard of Patrington left £10, half the interest of which was to be used to repair the bell frames, and the other half distributed to the poor for ever. photo shows his memorial in St Mary’s Lowgate, Hull.

On 2nd October 1738, Dick Turpin, alias John Palmer, was arrested for breach of the peace, shooting a gamecock in Brough and threatening to shoot a man. He was held in Beverley, where the JPs committed him to trial at York. It was believed that while living in East Yorkshire posing as a horse dealer, he took frequent trips to Lincolnshire to steal horses. He was hanged in York 7.4.1739. photo – Welton

On 2nd October 1883, Arthur Mallaby Illingworth, aged 7 months, died of scarlet fever. An epidemic had affected Hull since the previous year, killing over 600 people, mostly children under 5.  A brother born the following year, and named Arthur Mallaby Rawnsley Illingworth, died at 18 months, probably of the same cause.