April 25th

minstrels st mary's.JPG

On 25th April 1524, The Guild of Minstrels met in St Mary’s Beverley, as they did on this date each year, and revealed the new pillar which the guild paid for, to repair the damage done to the church in 1520 when the tower fell. 5 minstrels are pictured on the pillar.

On 25th April 1524, Walter Shore, a cooper from Barmby Moor, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 25th April 1534, Sir Ralph Ellerker stodd for election as a Beverley governor, even though he was not eligible; he kidnapped and intimidated members of his opposition, was re-elected. The Archbishop of York ruled in the Star Chamber that the election was null and void.

On 25th April 1795, William Jackson, 25 of Keyingham, was hanged at York Castle for stealing 10 sheep.

On 25th April 1832, James Acland, of 23 Queen Street, Hull, printer and owner of Hull Portfolio, was elected churchwarden at Holy Trinity Church, Hull.  He campaigned against corruption in local government and headed the Hull Political Union.

On 25th April 1915, Father William Joseph Finn, 40, was the first padre of WW1 to be killed. At Gallipoli, Turkey, he ignored an order not to go ashore with the troops, and spent a long time offering help or consolation to the wounded and dying, before being killed himself. He was buried on V Beach. The Church of the Sacred Heart, Southcoates Lane, Hull, was built in 1926 and paid for in his honour by his brother, Frank Finn, Lord Mayor  of Hull. (b 27.12.1875)

Father Wm Finn 2

April 13th

On 13th April 1280, Richard de Vescy, also known as Kesham, was offered the post of Rector of North Ferriby by Lady Agnes de Vescy, but Archbishop Wickwane ran a campaign to remove illegitimate clergy, and declined.  Richard de Vescy and several supporters occupied the church, seized its property, and beat up priests and clerks trying to obtain possession ‘almost to death’. The archbishop did not recover the church until October, and ordered some of the supporters to perform penance.  2 years later, Richard de Vesci was appointed rector of Escrick.

On 13th April 1563, Hull Mayor John Smith presided over a council meeting that agreed that no ships in the Haven should carry a fire or lit candle at night on pain of a fine; this was imposed after a vessel called the Dragon was set alight by negligence, and put other ships nearby in danger. A further law was passed in 1584 prohibiting the heating of tar on board ships, and all gunpowder had to be offloaded within 24 hours of docking, on pain of 8 days in prison, and a 20shilling fine.

On 13th April 1743, Mary Maister (nee Cayley) , her baby son and 2 maidservants, died in a fire at the original Maister House, High Street, Hull, which spread quickly up the wooden staircase.  Henry Maister rebuilt the house the following year with a stone staircase. This National Trust property is currently closed.

On 13th April 1838, Hull & Selby Railway ran an excursion from Selby to Hull, returning the same day.  From Howdendike to Hull by packet boat, arriving Hull 1.00, leaving again 5.00p.m. First class and best cabin 8shillings, 2ndclass & common cabin 6shillings.

On 13th April 1886, Ethel Leginska, nee Liggins, was born in Pemberton Street, Sutton-on-Hull. A musical child prodigy,  she made her debut performance as a pianist on her 9thbirthday, at St George’s Hall, Hull, and was playing in London’s Queen’s Hall the following year. At 11, she went to study in Frankfurt. She was a concert pianist, conductor, teacher and composer. She established the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra, Boston English Opera company, and National Women’s Symphony Orchestra, and was director of Chicago Women’s Symphony Orchestra. (d 26.2.1970) . She was the first woman to conduct many of the world’s leading orchestras, first woman to conduct grand opera (her own opera), and a pioneer for women in music.

Ethel Leginska

 

April 9th

On 9th April 1484, John de la Pole, Earl of Lincoln, became Heir Presumptive to the English throne, when the Prince of Wales (son of Richard III, his maternal uncle) died. The Earl died 3 years later, aged 25 at the Battle of Stoke, in a rebellion against Henry Tudor.

On 9th April 1610, the household accounts show that the number of servants in residence in the various houses of Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, (incl Londesborough House and Skipton Castle) rose from 49 to 83 after he inherited the Earldom. They included 4 musicians, and a huntsman.

On 9th April 1646, Matthew Topham, merchant of Hull, was fined £90 as a member of the Royalist army (delinquent) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament.

On 9th April 1814, Hull gunsmith Owen Probin, 38, was murdered by John Lever, a saddler, who had had a violent quarrel with Probin the previous day in Silver Street.

On 9th April 1858,  Sir Thomas Aston Clifford Constable and Rosina, Lady Constable, with a number of other ‘distinguished amateurs’ performed a programme of music at a charity concert  in The Music Hall, Jarratt Street, in aid of education for poor children in Hull.

On 9th April 1869, the Attorney General moved that a Royal Commission be set up to enquire into corrupt practices at the general election in Beverley the previous year. At least 800 people had been bribed, and corruption at Beverley was said to be ‘worse than at Norwich and Bridgewater put together’. The enquiry is said to have led directly to the 1872 Ballot Act.

On 9th April 1933, Canon Edward Arthur Berry, vicar of Drypool (grandfather of Mary Berry) was one of the speakers at a mass meeting in the Balmoral Room, Metropole Hall, West Street, Hull, called by the Jewish community to protest against Nazi actions against Jews in Germany.

 

 

March 29th

On 29th March 1241, William de Forz II, count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness, died of illness beside the Mediterranean, en route to Jerusalem, aged between 45 and 50. At times close to Kings John and Henry III, he changed sides and rebelled several times, was excommunicated twice, having to seek sanctuary in Fountains Abbey, but was pardoned.

On 29th March 1689, Sir John Hotham, 2ndbaronet, was buried, after dying aged 57 of a violent cold. He had just been greeted enthusiastically as the new governor of Hull, having come from Holland with William of Orange. He was the grandson of Sir John Hotham, the Hull governor who turned away Charles I.

On 29th March 1759, John Courtney recorded in his diary that the Beverley Assembly Rooms in North Bar Street/Lairgate hosted ‘a very splendid show of ladies and gentlemen and a very agreeable ball’; Beverley lacked industry, but was a desirable place for gentry to build large Georgian houses.

On 29th March 1776, Eliza Bordington and Thomas Akerman, 37, of Flambrough, were hanged at York Micklegate Bar for poisoning Mr Bordington (presumably Eliza’s husband), and Eliza’s body was also burnt.

On 29th March 1874, John William Duncan, aged 12, was a member of  Hull’s Spring Bank Orphanage’s new brass band. The band gave its first performance, marching from the Trinity House Almshouses, Beverley Road, to Victoria Pier and back. They only knew 4 tunes. They went on to play by request at cricket matches, school treats and concerts.

On 29th March 1972, Joseph Arthur Rank died aged 83. The son of Joseph Rank (see 28.3), he ran his flour milling company, and became interested in films began as a way of getting the Methodist message across. He set up The Rank Organisation in 1937, producing films, and owning 650 cinemas and 5 film studios. 1stBaron Rank. (B 22.12.1888 at Chestnut Villas, Holderness Rd, Hull).

joseph rank

March 1st

On 1st March 1384, Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, left in his will instructions to found the Charterhouse Hospital which his father had begun, and endowed it with land, nominating Sir Richard de Killing as the first Master, and left money to support 13 poor men and 13 poor women, feeble and old.

On 1st March 1838, the steam packet ferry services from Hull to Selby, Goole and Gainsbrough were restored, after severe frosts disrupted them from the 2ndweek in January.

On 1st March 1916,  a new Royal Flying Corps Squadron, the No 47 Home Defence Squadron, was formed at Beverley, on the racecourse site.

On 1st March 1921, Kenny Baker was born  in Withernsea. Musician and composer, considered the best British trumpeter, 3 times winner of best jazz trumpet player award, he played for Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis, the Beatles, and on TV and film soundtracks, including James Bond scores, The Muppet show, and ‘The Beiderbecke Trilogy’. (died 7.12.1999) see photo

On 1st March 1990, Sister Agnes Walsh was recognised by Yad Vashem as one of 27 British people known as Righteous Among the Nations for her part in protecting Jews during the Holocaust. Trapped in France when the country was occupied by the Nazis, she gave refuge to a local Jewish family in spite of being in grave danger herself as a foreigner. She was born Clare Walsh in Hull in 1896 (died 1993).

Kenny Baker

 

February 2nd

On 2nd February 1141, during the Anarchy, William of Aumale, Lord of Holderness and Earl of York led part of the cavalry protecting King Stephen, but were overrun by the Welsh and fled. The King was captured, and Matilda took the throne for a time. William remained loyal to Stephen.

On 2nd February 1786, Revd T.O. Rogers Hull opened the new Trinity House School with 36 pupils.

On 2nd February 1799, Capt Henry Gunter RN was in charge of HMS Nautilus when she was wrecked in a storm Off Flamborough Head; all the crew survived. She was leading a convoy of 22 merchantmen returning from the Baltic; one of the other ships was also wrecked.

On 2nd February 1801, Hull Trinity House paid relief of £1 1s to 4 seamen who had escaped from captivity in Russia.

On 2nd February 1925, David Whitfield was born in Hull. A popular singer, he was the first UK male vocalist to earn a gold disc, and the first British artiste to reach No 1 simultaneously in the US and the UK. Commemorated by a statue outside the New Theatre. d 16.1.1980

David Whitfield