January 12th

On 12th January 1808, Robert Escritt and John Paul, agricultural labourers, were probably the last people to be sentenced to the pillory in Driffield. They were found guilty of blackmailing gentleman farmer Francis Brown of Kelleythorpe, after accusing him of raping John Paul. They were sentenced to stand in the pillory at Driffield on 3 consecutive market days, and to a year in the House of Correction, Beverley. N.B. Sodomy was punishable by hanging at the time.

On 12th January 1819, William Clowes, one of the founders of Primitive Methodism,  began an evangelical mission in Hull, preaching in an old factory in North Street.               (b12.3.1780 Burslem, d3.3.1851, buried in Western General Cemetery).

On 12th January 1963, Hull Pilot cutter J.H. Fisher sank west of Spurn Point after colliding with the oil tanker Esso Glasgow, heading for Saltend in a blinding snowstorm. All crew were safely taken off. During the coldest weather in Britain since 1740, pilots also had to cope with ice-floes off Spurn, and the River Humber itself freezing near Brough. photo credit: Ian Burrett

Big Freeze 1963

 

 

 

November 18th

On 18th November 1620, the son of Thomas Peirson of Shipton (now Shiptonthorpe) hoped for a post in the kitchen at Londesborough House, the seat of Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland. Either he was not suitable, or there was no post available. He was given 12d costs as compensation. Posts were usually filled by personal recommendation, often from families who had worked in the house in the past.

On 18th November 1910, Benjamin Bolton, aged 48, of 5 Suffolk Terrace, Hornsea, died after falling from a moving train near Brough.  A prominent Hornsea citizen, member of the Conservative Party and member of Hornsea Music Union, he played cricket for Hull, Hornsea & Yorkshire and bowled out W G Grace. The inquest returned a verdict of accidental death. (b23.9.1862 Cottingham)

On 18th November 1938, Sir Henry Joseph Wood, founder of the Proms, resigned as conductor of the Hull Philharmonic Society after 15 years. The committee considered Sir Malcolm Sargent as his replacement, but he was not available. Basil Cameron was engaged. photo shows the orchestra in Hull City Hall

hull-philharmonic-orchestra-lst198215

October 2nd

On 2nd October 1200, King John gave permission for an annual fair at Howden lasting a week; by the 19th Century it had become the biggest horse fair in England, but by 2007 Howden Fair had reduced to a 1-day event.

On 2nd October 1504, Thomas Henrison, husbandman of Skipsea, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 2nd October 1518, Thomas Weston, a ‘singingman’, from Snaith, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt.

On 2nd October 1541, the Privy Council of England sat in Hull.

On 2nd October 1658, Capt Robert Hildyard of Patrington left £10, half the interest of which was to be used to repair the bell frames, and the other half distributed to the poor for ever. photo shows his memorial in St Mary’s Lowgate, Hull.

On 2nd October 1738, Dick Turpin, alias John Palmer, was arrested for breach of the peace, shooting a gamecock in Brough and threatening to shoot a man. He was held in Beverley, where the JPs committed him to trial at York. It was believed that while living in East Yorkshire posing as a horse dealer, he took frequent trips to Lincolnshire to steal horses. He was hanged in York 7.4.1739. photo – Welton

On 2nd October 1883, Arthur Mallaby Illingworth, aged 7 months, died of scarlet fever. An epidemic had affected Hull since the previous year, killing over 600 people, mostly children under 5.  A brother born the following year, and named Arthur Mallaby Rawnsley Illingworth, died at 18 months, probably of the same cause.

 

August 21st

On 21st August 1821, Zachariah Charles Pearson was born in Hull.  Ship’s captain, later ship owner.  Sheriff of Hull 1858, Mayor 1859 – 1862. In 1860, he gave 27 acres to the town for a public park, now Pearson Park. During the American Civil War, he sold arms and equipment to the Confederates, it is said to ensure a supply of cotton to the Hull cotton mills.   He lost several ships to action by the US Federal Navy and was made bankrupt in 1863. He resigned all public posts, and was disgraced, never regaining his former position. Died 29.10.1891

On 21st August 1833, the flying buttresses at the northeast of the tower of St Patrick’s church, Patrington, were blown down and damaged the roof during a violent storm.

On 21st August 2005, Hull businessman Graham Boanas waded across the Humber, from Brough to Whitton, one of the most dangerous waterways in the UK, to raise money for charity.  The only recorded instance of this feat.

graham boanas