December 27th

On 27th December 1442, John Shale, mariner, and John Roper, chaplain, conveyed to William Riplyngham, merchant, a tenement and garden in Le Pavement, Hull.

On 27th December 1804, the crew of Danish ship Familian was rescued when their ship ran aground on Stoney Binks, off Spurn Point, on a journey from Longsound to Hull.

On 27th December 1822, Richard Walker of Beverley was robbed and murdered at Leconfield by William Johnson, 23. Johnson was convicted and hanged at York Castle 24.3.1823, and his body delivered to surgeons for dissection.

spurn lighthouse.JPG

December 23rd

On 23rd December 1226, Robert ‘Furfan’ de Ros, of Roos, died, aged about 54. 1stLord of Helmsley, son-in-law of the Scottish king William the Lion, a Knight Templar and one of the barons enforcing the Magna Carta. His tomb is in the Temple church, London.

On 23rd December 1510, Peter Swake and Roland Dale of Catton claimed sanctuary at the church of St Cuthbert, Durham, as accessories to homicide. About 25.11.1510, they were present when Richard Horsley of Catton was taken from his mother’s house in Catton to a field, where he received several wounds, from which he died about a month later. They feared being  indicted as accessories. On 5.7.1511, another Catton man, William Ratcliff, entered the sanctuary with the same story, although he had taken sanctuary in Beverley for the homicide the previous year.

On 23rd December 1535, Austin Tennant of Hull claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for homicide and felony (details not recorded).  On the same day, the sanctuary received another 4 fugitives, from Leeds, Wakefield, and Thornton and Tealby in Lincs, 3 for felony and 1 for debt.

On 23rd December 1640, Sir John Lister died in Hull, aged 53. He left land at Thorngumbald to provide income for the poor, and money to set up the almshouses known as Lister’s Hospital. Twice Mayor of Hull, and MP, he built the house now known as Wilberforce House. He is commemorated in Holy Trinity church, where he also left money for repairs.

On 23rd December 1689, Johannes Frederick Bellow, a Danish trooper, was executed in Beverley Market Place for killing fellow soldier Daniel Straker, in a duel. Both are buried in St Mary’s churchyard.

On 23rd December 1732, a hurricane removed the roof and steeple of Hornsea church, destroyed 24 houses and overturned a windmill, and interrupted the parish clerk in the act of concealing smuggled goods in the crypt of the church.

danish soldiers st mary's.JPG

December 16th

On 16th December 1512, William Crag of Cave claimed sanctuary at the church of St Cuthbert, Durham, for ‘asportation’; along with others, he had stolen 25 horses and mares, near Cave; in addition, in a certain park near Airton by York, he stole 3 other horses.

On 16th December 1586, the Earl of Huntingdon, on behalf of the Council in the North, wrote to the Hull Corporation to ask them to prevent merchants profiteering from the corn shortage by purchasing stocks for poor relief at a reasonable rate.

On 16th December 1645, Hull draper Robert Cartwright was fined £47 as a former Captain in the Royalist army (a ‘delinquent’) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament.

On 16th December 1689, a number of Danish soldiers were in William of Orange’s army, and 2 of them quarrelled and settled their dispute by a sword duel at Beverley. The survivor was beheaded in Saturday Market. (see 23.12)

On 16th December 1929, the R100 airship, the largest airship ever designed, made by a team led by Sir Barnes Neville Wallis, and including novelist Neville Shute Norway, took its maiden voyage from Spaldington Air Station.

On 16th December 2010, Easington tithe barn was offered for sale at an auction with a guide price of £125,000 and failed to sell. The 14thC building is the last remaining tithe barn in the county, and a Grade II listed building.

Easington tithe barn

November 27th

On 27th November 1642, Royalist soldiers claiming to be Danish sailors, were in Hull as spies. Their aim was to open the gates when they saw a signal from a troop of Cavaliers coming from York. They opened the gates, but the lantern belonged to a miller returning home. Their cover had been blown; the Cavaliers had been routed and did not arrive. 2 of the Royalists were killed and the rest taken prisoner. N.B. I have not been able to verify this story.

On 27th November 1948, William Jackson & Son Ltd opened the first self-service grocery store in the area (beating Cusson’s by only 10 days). The experiment failed, requiring an extra employee to be taken on, and the store reverted to normal service within a year. photo shows an early Jackson’s store.

On 27th November 1969, the tug Hullman capsized in the River Humber off Grimsby whilst towing the Conoco Arrow, and 3 of her 10 crew died. The tug was recovered and returned to service. On 23.10.1971, she was lost in the North Sea while towing a crane barge.

Wm Jackson & Co

November 13th

On 13th November 1002, English King Ethelred ordered the massacre of all the Danish in England on St Brice’s Day. East Yorkshire being in the Danelaw, where Danish and English were well integrated, the order appears to have been ignored here.

On 13th November 1684, John Largeman of Patrington married for the 3rdtime; he married his second wife Elizabeth Dunn on 31stJuly, and she died in September; his first wife had died in April of the same year. It is not known what killed his 3 wives, although plague is recorded in parts of Yorkshire in that year.

On 13th November 1916, was a private in the Hull Sportsmen’s Pals Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment, at the Battle of the Ancre, WW1. His heroism in seizing German positions alone was rewarded with a Victoria Cross (for valour). (b 28.6.1897 died 21.2.1941) photo shows members of the 13th Battalion (Hull Sportsmen)

Hull PALS 13Btn sportsmen

September 26th

On 26th September 1480, Elizabeth Beauwmont, gentlewoman of Hedon, and Robert Beauwmont, clerk of Almondbury, sought sanctuary in the church of St John, Beverley,  for the death of Thomas Aldirlay of Almondbury, killed by them on 5 Oct 1479. (We do not know the relationship between the 2 )

On 26th September 1643, Col Oliver Cromwell and Lord Willoughby crossed the Humber to view the defence of Hull for themselves, and took some of the cavalry back with them, horses being of limited use in the besieged town.

On 26th September 1649, Marmaduke Richardson of Pocklington was hanged at York Castle for praying publicly before his sermon for Charles II, King of Scotland and heir apparent. (Prince of Wales).

On 26th September 1794, John Magnus, a Dane, was buried at Blacktoft after drowning in the Humber and washing up at Thornton Land.

On 26th September 1917, L/Cpl Thomas Edgar Borrill, 20, former Reckitt’s employee,  died on active service with the Sherwood Foresters. He has no known grave.

Oliver Cromwell

 

September 19th

On 19th September 1069, Northumbrians (incl Morcar and Edwin) with help of Danes besieged York and took Sir Wm Mallet hostage; in retaliation, William razed York to the ground and began the Harrying of the North. In effect, this was ethnic cleansing; some villages in the East Riding were still worth a fraction of their value 20 years later, or simply described as ‘waste’.

On 19th September 1532, William Orrell, a gentleman from Hull, was recorded as having been in the sanctuary of Westminster Abbey for about a year.  He had confessed to murdering Hull merchant John Lownde and was involved in complex legal questions as to whether he was an outlaw or not. He lobbied the King for restoration of his properties and positions, and by the 1540s was described as a gentleman of the King’s household.

On 19th September 1576, orders were given by Mayor and aldermen in York that the  house and shop of Gregory Burgess, physician & apothecary, should be shut up, probably because he had moved to Hull the previous year to treat people suffering from plague; and that he should be banned from entering York until further orders.

On 19th September 1674, bricklayer/builder William Catlyn, was elected Sheriff of Hull, but petitioned the town, pleading that his work took him to Lincolnshire, and he was unable to carry out the post. His petition seems to have succeeded, but he eventually became sheriff in 1683. Catlyn was responsible for building Wilberforce House, Crowle House, the Charterhouse and Master’s House (1628-1709). Brother of John Catlyn, Master of Hull Grammar School. photo shows Crowle House

On 19th September 1935, Herbert Morrison MP, and later High Steward of Hull, officially opened Queens Gardens, formed after the Queen’s Dock was closed in 1930. On the same day, the Wilberforce Monument, which had been moved from Monument Bridge, was rededicated by Wilberforce’s great granddaughter, Mrs Arnold Reckitt (nee Ann Barbara Wilberforce). Another relative of Morrison’s, Lord Peter Mandelson, later became High Steward of Hull.Crowle House