March 11th

bearward

On 11th March 1214, Hawise, Countess of Aumale and heir of the Seigniory of Holderness, died single, having been widowed 3 times.  In 1212, she refused to marry for a 4thtime, for which she had to pay a fine to King John of 5,000 marks (about £1700) (some sources say she died before 8.3.1214)

On 11th March 1296, John Romanus (John le Romaine) Archbishop of York, died aged about 66 in the Archbishop’s Palace, Bishop Burton; he was buried in York Minster. He protected poor villagers in 1286 by ordering his parish priests in Holderness not to demand tithes from those earning 5shillings a year or less.

On 11th March 1522, Beverley bearward John Grene was tried for slander, by calling Percevall Robson, draper, a ‘Scottish bird’. Grene apologised for speaking in anger, and was rebuked and forgiven by Robson.

On 11th March 1616, Father Thomas Atkinson was hanged, drawn and quartered at York Castle at the age of 70. Born in the East Riding and trained in Douai as a Catholic priest, Atkinson spent 30 years as an itinerant priest in the Howden area, ministering to local Catholics, and hiding in their homes. He was captured in the Vavasour house in Willitoft. He was beatified 1987. A young man at the execution bought the priest’s stockings from the hangman, as a holy relic. Identified as a Catholic, he was imprisoned.

On 11th March 1858, Brother John of the Yorkshire Catholic Reformatory took some boys, for a treat, to slide on the ice-covered Market Weighton Canal; 5 boys fell through and, attempting to save them, he also fell through the ice. They all had to be rescued by passing bargemen.

On 11th March 1859 at 6a.m., ostler John Sissons was found hanged in one of the stables of the George & Dragon Inn, Aldbrough. He was described as an aged man of respectable family. The inquest verdict was of suicide due to temporary insanity.

March 10th

Holy Trinity

On 10th March 1425, Hull Holy Trinity Church, was consecrated; building began in 1291 and was interrupted by the Black Death.

On 10th March 1447, Henry VI issued a charter enlarging the county of Hull to include Hessle, North Ferriby, Swanland, West Ella, Kirk Ella, Tranby, Willerby, Wolfreton, Anlaby, the site of Haltemprice Priory and Derringham Dike.

On 10th March 1623, George Tummond, butcher, of Patrington, was found dying at sunrise in Winestead, after starting to walk home from the alehouse in Ottringham. Holderness was notorious for its floods.

On 10th March 1800, George Hudson, the “Railway King’, was born in Howsham.  He  made a great business and political career from sharp practice and bribery (was MP for Sunderland, and Lord Mayor of York). He became hugely rich, but was disgraced, and imprisoned for debt, though released when his debts were paid by public subscription. In 1845, he bought the Londesborough Estate for £470,000. D14.12.1871

On 10th March 1823, John Bacchus Dykes was born in Hull. By the age of 10, was assistant organist at St John’s Church, Myton. Became a vicar, and composed over 300 hymn tunes, including ‘Eternal Father, Strong to Save’ and ‘We plough the fields and scatter’. (d 22.1.1876)

On 10th March 1921, Mr J.H. Tate proposed a motion at Hornsea Golf Club that ’Old Jack be shot’! It is assumed Old Jack was the horse used to pull mowers and rollers on the course.

On 10th March 1954, Alex May, master of the tug Fenman, died in hospital after the tug was overrun by the ship she was towing, the Rudolf, and sank, on the way into Hull’s Alexandra Dock. 2 of the crew were swept away. There was 1 survivor.

March 1st

On 1st March 1384, Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, left in his will instructions to found the Charterhouse Hospital which his father had begun, and endowed it with land, nominating Sir Richard de Killing as the first Master, and left money to support 13 poor men and 13 poor women, feeble and old.

On 1st March 1838, the steam packet ferry services from Hull to Selby, Goole and Gainsbrough were restored, after severe frosts disrupted them from the 2ndweek in January.

On 1st March 1916,  a new Royal Flying Corps Squadron, the No 47 Home Defence Squadron, was formed at Beverley, on the racecourse site.

On 1st March 1921, Kenny Baker was born  in Withernsea. Musician and composer, considered the best British trumpeter, 3 times winner of best jazz trumpet player award, he played for Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis, the Beatles, and on TV and film soundtracks, including James Bond scores, The Muppet show, and ‘The Beiderbecke Trilogy’. (died 7.12.1999) see photo

On 1st March 1990, Sister Agnes Walsh was recognised by Yad Vashem as one of 27 British people known as Righteous Among the Nations for her part in protecting Jews during the Holocaust. Trapped in France when the country was occupied by the Nazis, she gave refuge to a local Jewish family in spite of being in grave danger herself as a foreigner. She was born Clare Walsh in Hull in 1896 (died 1993).

Kenny Baker

 

February 27th

On 27th February 1468, the will of Joan de Twyer directs that she be buried in the chapel of the Hospital of St Sepulchre ‘juxta Hedon’, a leper hospital endowed by the Twyer family.

On 27th February 1895, Lancelot George Prickett, FCH, engineer, died aged 38 in the service of the Indian Government; as an engineer working on Indian railways. Born 15.12.1856 in Bridlington.

On 27th February 1941, 2 bombs landed in Hotham village, throwing the owner, Colonel Clitherow, into the fireplace. No other injuries are recorded. North Cave church lost its East window in the blast. photo shows Hotham Hall today

On 27th February 1976, Fred Peart, Minister of Ag, Fisheries & Food, reopened Hull’s Albert Dock after refurbishment for the fishing industry. The Cod War which ended in 1976 effectively put an end to Hull’s fishing industry.

hotham hall

February 14th

On 14th February 1763, Mr Newmarch, lighthouse keeper at Spurn Point, reported to his employer that the low light had ‘washed down wholly all together’.

On 14th February 1792, Thomas Wilson, son of a lighterman, was baptised at Dagger Lane Independent Chapel, Hull, He became a clerk, then salesman, set up a business  importing iron, and eventually became owner of Thomas Wilson, Sons & Co, the beginning of the Wilson Line, a multi-national business; his son Charles became Lord Nunburnholme.

On 14th February 1803, Burnett’s Shipping List reported the departure of the first whaler leaving for the fishing grounds that season: the Adventure, captain’s name Gibson, headed for the Davis Strait, got into the roads, but it was a week before it got under way. 5 other whalers left in February, followed by 33 in March. 2 other Hull whalers, the Thomas and the Lynx, appear not to have sailed that season.

On 14th February 1927, 12 Rail passengers died in a head-on rail collision near Hull Paragon Station; 40 others were injured. The outgoing Hull to Scarborough train was put on the same track as the train arriving from Withernsea.

TrainCrash1927

February 1st

On 1st February 1639, King Charles I issued an order to enclose Hull and improve its fortifications.

On 1st February 1714, a great wind caused damage in several places, and blew down Richard Stevenson’s house in Kilpin, then the fire in the hearth destroyed the remains.

On 1st February 1884, at the Hull Sanitary Congress, Hull City Hall, Rev Joseph Malet Lambert called for bold action to save hundreds of lives, and improve thousands more, by dealing with dreadful housing conditions, some of them a stone’s throw from the City Hall. The slums were cleared 20 years later.

On 1st February 1893, Hedon Gymnastic Society put on an ‘Assault-at-Arms’, with an appearance by a clown, and followed by a dance in the Board School room, Roos.

On 1st February 1922, Robert Anderson, 26 of 7 Emily Terrace, Gillett St was lost with 9 shipmates when Hull trawler Magneta was wrecked off Murmansk, under Russian arrest.

On 1st February 1983, 800 dignitaries, service representatives and families of the Norland crew gathered at the King George Dock Terminal Building, Hull. They were there to greet the return of North Sea Ferries Norland after over 9 months in the Falklands War supporting the troops. Unfortunately, 90 mph winds did not allow the ship to dock, and it rode out the storm in the Humber for several hours , by which time the banquet was over.  Hundreds of people were still there to greet them at the quayside in the evening. The Norland was refurbished and returned to the Rotterdam run on 20thApril.

Norland return

January 30th

Mary Ward

On 30th January 1499, Robert Colstone of Hull and Marmaduke Pateson of  Flambrough claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley – Colstone for debt and Pateson for the murder at Flambrough of John Mottows.

On 30th January 1645, Mary Ward died aged 60. A cousin of the Wright brothers of Welwick, she spent 5 years living there with her grandmother and spent a further 6 years at Osgodby. She founded the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary and championed women’s education. She was declared Venerable in 2009. (b23.1.1585 Mulwith Yorks) see photo

On 30th January 1901, Beverley Mayor Elwell proclaimed the accession of King Edward VII to a large crowd at the Market Cross, despite bitterly cold weather and a snow storm.

On 30th January 1913, Harry Houdini, escapologist, performed at the Palace Theatre, Hull. He escaped from a canvas sea bag and straps; the challenge was signed by seamen Dan Morris, Tom Carr and Robert Mason.

On 30th January 1983, Captain Derek Wharton of North Sea Ferry Norland spent the day sailing back and forth in Bridlington Bay, having arrived back from service in the Falklands War a little too early for the homecoming celebration planned for 1stFebruary.

Houdini copy

 

 

January 19th

 

Pilgr Grace

On 19th January 1537, Sir Francis Bigod was attacked by Ellerker’s men in Beverley, and most of his men were captured. After failing to capture Scarborough, he had gathered more followers at Bainton, but heard that John Hallam had failed to capture Hull. Bigod escaped to the north, and was eventually captured in March. Both Bigod and Hallam were executed.

On 19th January 1684, Sir Robert Hilyard, knight & Baron of Patrington, gave his son Capt Robert Hilyard ‘2 whole pues or closets, which were positioned in the South Transept’.

On 19th January 1970, Alan Plater oversaw the first production at the new theatre in Spring Street of his own play ‘Don’t Build a Bridge, Drain the River’, with music by Mike Chapman and Mike Waterson. The Humberside Arts Centre later became Humberside Theatre, and then Hull Truck Theatre. see photo

On 19th January 1979, William Rodgers, Secretary of State for Transport, reported in the House of Commons that as the result of an industrial dispute in the road haulage industry, there was no movement of grain or animal feed out of Hull docks. The importance of Hull was stressed, as other parts of the country depended on it to deliver goods.

On 19th January 2014, the Environment Agency closed Sutton Lock on the River Derwent to navigation due to safety concerns. The lock had been reconstructed in 1972 to enable pleasure craft to travel up to Stamford Bridge and give access to the Pocklington Canal. There seemed to be uncertainty as to who owned the gates and equipment.

Spring St theatre

January 9th

On 9th January 1779, Morfitt Kilham, Richard Basehead, Isaac Cockshaw, John Emerson and Robt Fowler were each paid 1s for a day’s work filling the ice house on Beilby Thompson’s estate at Escrick Hall from the river, together with a share in a cheese worth 4s8d.

On 9th January 1836, Hull Trinity House provided relief to the families of men whose vessels were shipwrecked at the Davis Straits fishery.

On 9th January 1875, drivers Charles Sissons and William Jackson, and conductor Edward Read staffed Hull’s first tram when the Beverley Road line opened, and carried 1,116 passengers on the first day. The fare for the whole distance was 2d. Two trams operated a half hourly service, hauled by Flemish horses.

On 9th January 1935, Clarence Tomlinson aged 17, and 12 (some sources say 14) shipmates, died on board trawler Edgar Wallace off St Andrews Dock, Hull, when the ship foundered on a sand bank and sank, returning to home dock after trip to Bear Island.  The engineer of the salvage team also died when the tug Boatman capsized. 3 survived.

 

 

December 22nd

On 22nd December 1530, Beverley draper William Leryfax wrote his will, and appointed as guardians for his son Robert the priors of Watton Abbey and Meaux Abbey. In 1539, both abbeys were dissolved, and the subprior of Watton had been hanged in chains in 1537 for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace.

On 22nd December 1580, the Hull Mayor and aldermen set the price of ale at a penny for a quart and a pint outsales, and a penny a quart and a gill in the alehouse.

On 22nd December 1802, George Knowsley of Cottingham Grange held a meeting at the Duke of Cumberland, Cottingham, to propose the building of a canal from Cottingham to Hull; the aim was to reduce transport costs and establish a local grain market. The Napoleonic Wars caused the project to be shelved, and it was never revived.