1st May

On 1st May 1603, surgeon Simon Crouch was admitted as a burgess of Hull free, on condition that he treat the poor at his own cost. There was an outbreak of plague that summer, and Simon Crouch was known to be still in Hull in 1610.

On 1st May 1676, Leonard Gaskill, 27, and Peter Rook, 25, of Beverley, were hanged for stealing 13 sheep from John Brown of Driffield.

On 1st May 1810, Hull gunsmith William Taylor was indicted for passing counterfeit money to Cecily Rickatson at Sculcoates and given 6 months in the House of Correction. He later set up in business in Beverley, where one of his apprentices in 1821 was Esau Akrill (the Akrill family ran a gunshop in Beverley for many years).

On 1st May 1826, Harriet Pease, wife of the banker Joseph Robinson Pease, of Hesslewood Hall, miscarried after horse riding. Medical help came from Hessle; Joseph’s  diary gave his opinion that she might have died if they had had to wait for a doctor to travel the 5 miles from Hull.

On 1st May 1877, William Pritchard, 21, apprentice of Porter St, Hull, drowned on board Hull trawler Iolanthe in the North Sea whilst boarding fish.

On 1st May 1911, the Royal National Lifeboat Institution took over responsibility for the lifeboat station at Spurn, after 3 years of acrimonious argument.

 

March 1st

On 1st March 1384, Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, left in his will instructions to found the Charterhouse Hospital which his father had begun, and endowed it with land, nominating Sir Richard de Killing as the first Master, and left money to support 13 poor men and 13 poor women, feeble and old.

On 1st March 1838, the steam packet ferry services from Hull to Selby, Goole and Gainsbrough were restored, after severe frosts disrupted them from the 2ndweek in January.

On 1st March 1916,  a new Royal Flying Corps Squadron, the No 47 Home Defence Squadron, was formed at Beverley, on the racecourse site.

On 1st March 1921, Kenny Baker was born  in Withernsea. Musician and composer, considered the best British trumpeter, 3 times winner of best jazz trumpet player award, he played for Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis, the Beatles, and on TV and film soundtracks, including James Bond scores, The Muppet show, and ‘The Beiderbecke Trilogy’. (died 7.12.1999) see photo

On 1st March 1990, Sister Agnes Walsh was recognised by Yad Vashem as one of 27 British people known as Righteous Among the Nations for her part in protecting Jews during the Holocaust. Trapped in France when the country was occupied by the Nazis, she gave refuge to a local Jewish family in spite of being in grave danger herself as a foreigner. She was born Clare Walsh in Hull in 1896 (died 1993).

Kenny Baker

 

January 10th

st mary's sculcoates.JPG

On 10th January 1308, Ivo de Etton of Temple Hirst, near Selby, and William de la Fenne from Faxfleet had been preceptors (heads) of local houses of the outlawed Knights Templar order, when they were arrested and imprisoned by Henry II on instructions of Pope Clement V. Also arrested were Richard de Ryston, chaplain, Thomas Tyeth, claviger (or warden), and Roger de Hugunde or Hogyndon, a brother in residence at Faxfleet, and Adam de Crake, claviger, at Temple Hirst.

On 10th January 1511, Richard Elynor of North Cave claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for a felony, but the register does not give any detail of his crime.

On 10th January 1537, Sir Francis Bigod, of Settrington, and John Hallam, of Cawkeld near Watton, met to discuss rekindling the Pilgrimage of Grace, which had ended in December with promises to restore the monasteries and hold a Parliament at York. They planned to seize Hull and Scarborough before they could be fortified.

On 10th January 1646, Stephen Thompson of Humbleton was fined £400 as the owner of Scarborough Castle and a Royalist (a ‘delinquent’) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament.

On 10th January 1761, Mrs Jane Delamoth died in Hull. Her memorial in St Mary’s Sculcoates may be the only memorial written in shorthand in the world. It says: ‘In the vault beneath this stone lies the body of Mrs Jane Delamoth, who departed this life 10thJanuary 1761. She was a poor sinner, but not wicked without holiness, departing from good works, and departed in the faith of the Catholic Church, in full assurance of eternal happiness, by the agony and bloody sweat, by the cross and passion, by the precious death and burial, by the glorious resurrection and ascension of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ’. see photo

On 10th January 1783, Rear Admiral John Storr died in Hilston. He is buried in Westminster Abbey. (b 18.8.1709) He commanded the Revenge at the Battle of Quiberon Bay 20.11.1759. His father Joseph built Storr’s Tower at Hilston in 1750. It served as a hospital for troops camped on the coast in 1794–5 and later as a cottage, but was disused in 1990. His memorial is in Hilston church.

On 10th January 1849, Cottingham land agent Thomas Spenceley reported that he had measured the distance from the Spa Inn, Aldbrough to the sea in 1832 and again in 1848 and the loss of land due to coastal erosion was 28 yards in that period. On 6.8.1832 the distance was 160 yards; on 11.8.1848 it was 132 yards, an average loss of 5ft 3” per year.

On 10th January 1952, Madame Clapham (Mrs Emily Clapham) died aged 96, the former Court Dressmaker of Kingston Square, Hull. Her fashions for high society made Hull ‘the rage’ according to Sir Osbert Sitwell.

On 10th January 1968, Hull trawler St Romanus left port and made radio contact with the owners that evening. A Mayday call was heard, but not passed on. The official enquiry concluded ship probably lost on 11thJanuary, reason unknown.

On 10th January 1968, Hull trawler Kingston Peridot of Hull left port and was not contacted until after 26 January. The enquiry concluded she probably capsized on 26th  or 27th January, due to extreme weather.

December 29th

On 29th December 1594, Sir Francis and Lady Clifford began a tradition in their new house  (Londesborough Hall) of Christmas and New Year feasts, entertaining 93 staff and local people, tenants from different villages on the estate on different days, to meals until 6thJanuary.

On 29th January 1611, they paid for entertainment from visiting puppeteers, 2 men and a woman, who called at the great house.

On 29th December 1817, Mary Woodall married John Lewis Friday, private in the 33rd (WR) Regiment of Foot, a  Waterloo veteran, who was probably born in Mozambique.

On 29th December 1829, Hedon MP Col John Baillie informed the Mayor of Hedon that the Post Office would have a daily post from Hedon instead of 4 days a week.

On 29th December 1881,  William Papper, 15, was murdered aboard fishing smack Rising Sun, in the North Sea, by Osmond Otto Brand, skipper of the boat, after prolonged mistreatment amounting to torture. Brand was found guilty of murder at Leeds Assizes and sentenced to death. Richard Rycroft was sentenced to 3 months’ hard labour for assault.

On 29th December 1898, Elsa (formerly Elfie) Gidlow was born in Hull. Lesbian poet known for On A Grey Thread 1923. Her family emigrated to Canada when she was 6 (d 8.6.1986)

 

November 26th

On 26th November 1319, Geoffrey Fitz Hugh and John de Wetewang conveyed property in Lyle Street (Mytongate), Hull,  to Hugh and Ellen Le Taverner.

On 26th November 1525, Richard Haton, gentleman, from Hayton, claimed sanctuary in St Mary’s Church, Hertford, and confessed to the coroner  that in October he had broken into a parish church in Essex and stolen a silver chalice; and in January he had burgled a house in Bucks and stolen jewellery and money. He abjured, i.e. renounced his country, and left through the port of Southampton.

On 26th November 1597, Sir Francis Barrington, Lord of the Manor of Cottingham (and uncle by marriage of Oliver Cromwell) wrote objecting to Hull Corporation’s drainage plan to move surplus water through his clough at Cottingham, which he said would risk flooding in the area.

On 26th November 1831, Joseph Robinson Pease, JP, spent his third consecutive day swearing in Special Constables to deal with anticipated riots; various sources say between 800 and 2,000 were sworn. James Acland had formed the Hull Political Union, and held meetings critical of the Hull Corporation, and said the aldermen were of out of touch and did not live in the town.

On 26th November 1847, Pocklington Canal Company agreed, at the Feathers Hotel, Pocklington, to sell the canal to the York & North Midland Railway, which also purchased the Market Weighton and Leven Canals. The canal had never been a financial success, and the railway company subsequently raised canal tolls so as to drive freight traffic onto the trains.

Pocklington canal
Melbourne lock

October 4th

On 4th October 1253, heavy flooding in Holderness resulted from a dry year and heavy rain. The River Hull changed its course.

On 4th October 1541, the Privy Council of England again sat in Hull.

On 4th October 1642, Capt John Hotham, after the Yorkshire Treaty of Neutrality was signed, began to return from Doncaster to Hull. The treaty was rejected by Parliament, and he detoured and captured Cawood Castle for Parliament, the Archbishop having fled.

On 4th October 1643, 400 Parliamentary soldiers went out of the besieged town of Hull and destroyed the Royalist forts in Sculcoates and Derringham Bank.

On 4th October 1785, Thomas Jackson of Blackfriargate, Hull, complained to the Mayor and corporation about nuisance caused by one of the town waites (official musicians) holding dancing lessons in Hales Entry.

On 4th October 1909, Hornsea Urban District Council conducted a poll of ratepayers, who voted to allow the council to enclose the Promenade Gardens and charge for admission.

On 4th October 1952, ship’s cook Cyril Brown, 44, and 19 shipmates were lost when Hull trawler Norman was wrecked. The sole survivor was Norman Spencer, 19. see Pathe news https://www.britishpathe.com/video/one-survivor-aka-trawler-disaster

 

September 24th

On 24th September 1298, an inquisition was held by the Court of Chancery into Sir Osbert de Spaldington’s goods and lands, which were taken by the king. As recently as 1296, Edward had made him Governor of Berwick, when he received Robert the Bruce and imprisoned Sir William Douglas. It is not known what the allegations against him were, and he recovered most of his land by 1300, after living on the generosity of others in the meantime.

On 24th September 1401, Pope Boniface IX declared John of Bridlington a saint. John was born in Thwing, had been the Prior of Bridlington and died of the plague in 1379, aged 59. 15 miracles are recorded during his life, and 12 after his death, including saving the lives of 5 Hartlepool fishermen caught in a storm. photo shows Brid Priory church

On 24th September 1678, the wife of Thomas Richardson of Wyton died and was buried in the Quaker cemetery in Sutton.

On 24th September 1779, Lord Rockingham, High Steward of Hull, chaired a public meeting in Hull Town Hall at which it was decided that 20 18-lb guns and military equipment due to be sent to Woolwich should be used instead to defend Hull from the threat of American attack. A few days later, the threat reduced when the Americans sailed for Holland.

On 24th September 1830, Hull gunsmith Thomas Rosindale was convicted of vagrancy, having been found in the kitchen of the dwelling house of Charles Frost of Albion St. He was sent to Sculcoates House of Correction for 1 month’s hard labour.

On 24th September 1832, Mr J. Dunn caught a 17lb trout near Driffield.

 

Brid Priory church