April 14th

On 14th April 1511, Walter Rugbe of Paull, a cooper, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of mariner Anthony Dowre of Boulogne.

On 14th April 1524, Sir Robert Constable of Flamborough, with 100 men, attacked the Rokebys’ manor house in Bishop Burton and abducted Ann Cresacre in a complex dispute over land and marriage agreements. Ann was 12 yearsold and an orphan. The case was heard in the Star Chamber. Ann eventually married the son of Sir Thomas More.  A descendant was the City Architect of Hull, Joseph Hirst. photo shows Holbein’s study for his picture of the More family – Ann is standing, rear.

On 14th April 1571, William Strickland of Boynton, MP, a leading Puritan, presented a Bill  to Parliament to reform the prayer book, including abolishing confirmation and the wearing of priests’ vestments.

On 14th April 1702, Jeremiah Northend was buried, aged 78 in Rowley. Aged 14, he had emigrated to Massachusetts with his Uncle Robert and cousin Ezekiel, with the dissenting community led by Rev Ezekiel Rogers, but returned home after about 9 years. Lived in Little Weighton. (b 26.9.1624).

Study_More_familyHans_Holbein

March 29th

On 29th March 1241, William de Forz II, count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness, died of illness beside the Mediterranean, en route to Jerusalem, aged between 45 and 50. At times close to Kings John and Henry III, he changed sides and rebelled several times, was excommunicated twice, having to seek sanctuary in Fountains Abbey, but was pardoned.

On 29th March 1689, Sir John Hotham, 2ndbaronet, was buried, after dying aged 57 of a violent cold. He had just been greeted enthusiastically as the new governor of Hull, having come from Holland with William of Orange. He was the grandson of Sir John Hotham, the Hull governor who turned away Charles I.

On 29th March 1759, John Courtney recorded in his diary that the Beverley Assembly Rooms in North Bar Street/Lairgate hosted ‘a very splendid show of ladies and gentlemen and a very agreeable ball’; Beverley lacked industry, but was a desirable place for gentry to build large Georgian houses.

On 29th March 1776, Eliza Bordington and Thomas Akerman, 37, of Flambrough, were hanged at York Micklegate Bar for poisoning Mr Bordington (presumably Eliza’s husband), and Eliza’s body was also burnt.

On 29th March 1874, John William Duncan, aged 12, was a member of  Hull’s Spring Bank Orphanage’s new brass band. The band gave its first performance, marching from the Trinity House Almshouses, Beverley Road, to Victoria Pier and back. They only knew 4 tunes. They went on to play by request at cricket matches, school treats and concerts.

On 29th March 1972, Joseph Arthur Rank died aged 83. The son of Joseph Rank (see 28.3), he ran his flour milling company, and became interested in films began as a way of getting the Methodist message across. He set up The Rank Organisation in 1937, producing films, and owning 650 cinemas and 5 film studios. 1stBaron Rank. (B 22.12.1888 at Chestnut Villas, Holderness Rd, Hull).

joseph rank

March 2nd

 

Flambro 'Danish tower'

On 2nd March 1406, James, Duke of Rothesay, son of Robert III of Scotland, was on his way to sanctuary in France, when he was captured by pirates, held in the Danish Tower in Flamborough for a time, then handed over to English King Henry IV. photo shows the Danish Tower

On 2nd March 1829, Rev John Scott, vicar of St Mary’s Lowgate, with many others, spoke at a public meeting in Hull Market Place to consider petitioning Parliament against Catholic Emancipation. Daniel Sykes, Whig MP for Hull, did not believe these vocal agitators were representative of the majority in Hull.

On 2nd March 1905, Cuthbert Brodrick died in Jersey aged 83. Nationally renowned architect of Leeds Town Hall, Scarborough’s Grand Hotel, Hull Town Hall (demolished 1912) and Hull’ s Royal Institution. (b Hull 1.12.1821)

 

February 10th

On 10th February 1644, Sir William Constable of Flamborough led Parliamentary troops from Hull in routing the Royalists at Kilham.

On 10th February 1801, Sir Samuel Standidge, aged 75, died at Thorngumbald. He was born at Bridlington, and at age 19 was taken prisoner by privateers and taken to Rhode Island. Later in life he traded goods to Rhode Island and bought lands in Holderness, building New York Farm, Preston, to mark his financial success in New York.  He is credited with restarting the Hull whaling industry, acting as master of his own whaler.  Sheriff of Hull, Mayor, and warden of Hull Trinity House 5 times. His memorial is  in St Mary’s Lowgate, Hull.

On 10th February 1866, 6 days after running aground on the Isle of Juist, Germany, 15 people were rescued from the rigging of the ‘Excelsior’ of Hull, where they survived without food and water. Mrs Newton was considered a hero for her support of her fellow survivors.

On 10th February 1871, at least 70 mariners lost their lives in Bridlington Bay in the Great Gale, including 6 lifeboatmen. 23 vessels were lost. There is a mass grave in the Bridlington Priory churchyard, and an annual Fishermen’s Service was held for 100 years.

On 10th February 1893, Revd Francis Orpen Morris died aged 82 at Nunburnholme. Vicar at Nafferton 1844-1854, rector of Nunburnholme to 1893. Irish-born naturalist and author of children’s books, and books on natural history and architecture. Anti-feminist, anti-hunting and opposed to Darwinism. (b25.3.1810)

On 10th February 1898, Commander Cave, of Humber guard ship Galatea, rescued the crew of SS Marbella in the River Humber, near Humber Dock, Hull. The Marbella had problems with its steering gear, and almost collided with 2 ships before hitting the Galatea. The only passenger had to swim to safety, and the Marbella’s cargo of 41 horses were all lost. The Galatea was itself later stranded on the Hebbles sandbank, but refloated later.

Saml Standidge memorial

February 5th

On 5th February 1538, widow Mabel Brygge, 32, servant of Holmpton, was examined by an enquiry headed by Sir Ralph Ellerker the younger. She was alleged to have carried out a ‘black fast’ with the aim of injuring King Henry VIII and the Duke of Norfolk, in relation to the King’s divorce and the Reformation. She was executed at York, along with John Dobson, vicar of Muston, and John Ainsworth, priest, who had also spoken out against the royal supremacy and Act of Succession.

On 5th February 1856, Humphry Sandwith, junior, MD, aged 34, had a public breakfast given in his honour as a war hero at Royal Station Hotel Hull.  He gained the Orders of St Stanislaus, Nishan Iftahar and Mejidie, and French Legion of Honour in the Crimean War. He was head surgeon at Hull General Infirmary 1847-48. Author of a number of memoirs, as well as 3-volume novel “Minsterborough’ about his upbringing in Beverley.

On 5th February 1909, George Gibbon, Melchoir Chadwick and Thomas Leng Major, fishermen, lost their lives attempting to rescue the crew of the coble Gleaner when it capsized. Their own boat also capsized, and all 6 lives were lost. A monument to this ‘Conspicuous Act of Bravery’ is in the village centre.

 

 

flambro

February 2nd

On 2nd February 1141, during the Anarchy, William of Aumale, Lord of Holderness and Earl of York led part of the cavalry protecting King Stephen, but were overrun by the Welsh and fled. The King was captured, and Matilda took the throne for a time. William remained loyal to Stephen.

On 2nd February 1786, Revd T.O. Rogers Hull opened the new Trinity House School with 36 pupils.

On 2nd February 1799, Capt Henry Gunter RN was in charge of HMS Nautilus when she was wrecked in a storm Off Flamborough Head; all the crew survived. She was leading a convoy of 22 merchantmen returning from the Baltic; one of the other ships was also wrecked.

On 2nd February 1801, Hull Trinity House paid relief of £1 1s to 4 seamen who had escaped from captivity in Russia.

On 2nd February 1925, David Whitfield was born in Hull. A popular singer, he was the first UK male vocalist to earn a gold disc, and the first British artiste to reach No 1 simultaneously in the US and the UK. Commemorated by a statue outside the New Theatre. d 16.1.1980

David Whitfield

 

January 13th

On 13th January 1096, King William Rufus found Count Odo, Lord of Holderness, guilty of a plot to kill the King and place his son Stephen (William I’s nephew) on the throne; Odo got off lightly with loss of his lands, and Stephen went on crusade. Holderness was granted to Arnulf, son of Earl Roger of Salisbury.

On 13th January 1621, Stephen Doughton left his job as servant of the Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, and received 2 years’ arrears of wages, a total of £5 6s8d. The family was short of cash, and servants were often not paid until they left the Earl’s employ.

On 13th January 1954, the crew of Flamborough lifeboat Friendly Forester saved the 3 crew of the fishing coble Silver Line.

On 13th January 1968, a liferaft belonging to the St Romanus of Hull was found.

St Andrews Dock memorial
Zebedee’s Yard