January 1st

January

On 1st January 1151, Meaux Abbey was founded on land given by William le Gros, Count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness.

On 1st January 1645, Captain John Hotham was executed for treason at Tower Hill, London.

On 1st January 1685, Alderman Duncalf of Hull gave £5, the interest of which to be given to the poor of Patrington every New Years Day.

On 1st January 1754, Joseph Pease opened Hull’s (and Yorkshire’s) first commercial bank at 18, High Street, Hull.

On 1st January 1841, Daniel Boyes, landlord of the Angel Inn, Beverley, started a new tradition, to bake an enormous game pie for customers; it weighed more than 7 stone. In 1844 the pie weighed 10 stone, and was 18” wide, 12” high, and 2’ 2” long.

On 1st January 1904, Hull GP Dr Francis William Fullerton obtained the first driving licence issued in Hull.

On 1st January 1908, the newly created Humber Conservancy Board took over responsibility for Humber lifeboats from Hull Trinity House, which had managed Spurn lifeboat for 97 years. The Board did not seem to realise the complexity of running a lifeboat service, and after 3 years of arguments, the RNLI took over in 1911.

March 29th

On 29th March 1241, William de Forz II, count of Aumale, Lord of Holderness, died of illness beside the Mediterranean, en route to Jerusalem, aged between 45 and 50. At times close to Kings John and Henry III, he changed sides and rebelled several times, was excommunicated twice, having to seek sanctuary in Fountains Abbey, but was pardoned.

On 29th March 1689, Sir John Hotham, 2ndbaronet, was buried, after dying aged 57 of a violent cold. He had just been greeted enthusiastically as the new governor of Hull, having come from Holland with William of Orange. He was the grandson of Sir John Hotham, the Hull governor who turned away Charles I.

On 29th March 1759, John Courtney recorded in his diary that the Beverley Assembly Rooms in North Bar Street/Lairgate hosted ‘a very splendid show of ladies and gentlemen and a very agreeable ball’; Beverley lacked industry, but was a desirable place for gentry to build large Georgian houses.

On 29th March 1776, Eliza Bordington and Thomas Akerman, 37, of Flambrough, were hanged at York Micklegate Bar for poisoning Mr Bordington (presumably Eliza’s husband), and Eliza’s body was also burnt.

On 29th March 1874, John William Duncan, aged 12, was a member of  Hull’s Spring Bank Orphanage’s new brass band. The band gave its first performance, marching from the Trinity House Almshouses, Beverley Road, to Victoria Pier and back. They only knew 4 tunes. They went on to play by request at cricket matches, school treats and concerts.

On 29th March 1972, Joseph Arthur Rank died aged 83. The son of Joseph Rank (see 28.3), he ran his flour milling company, and became interested in films began as a way of getting the Methodist message across. He set up The Rank Organisation in 1937, producing films, and owning 650 cinemas and 5 film studios. 1stBaron Rank. (B 22.12.1888 at Chestnut Villas, Holderness Rd, Hull).

joseph rank

March 15th

On 15th March 1471, King Edward IV’s army regrouped at Kilnsea, but met resistance in Holderness, with 6,000 men led by Sir John Westerdale, vicar of Keyingham, and/or Martin de la See, Lord of Barmston; Westerdale was later imprisoned in the Marshalsea. Edward was allowed to pass to Hull, where Mayor John Tutbury shut the gates and refused to let him in. From there Edward proceeded to York via Beverley.

On 15th March 1618, the 1strecorded Kiplingcotes Derby was run; it is said to date back to 1519.  The winner receives £50, but the 2ndreceives the sum of the entry fees, which may be much more.  Even in wartime, severe weather or foot and mouth outbreaks, at least 1 horse has completed the course to ensure the continuity of the event.  In 2018, due to flooding, one rider walked the course. Race rules state that if the race is not run one year, it must never be run again. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJu7HI3SXIc

On 15th March 1783, Thomas Perronet Thompson was born in Hull. He was an anti-slavery activist, MP, businessman, soldier, author and first governor of Sierra Leone (d 6.9.1869)

On 15th March 1979, Helen Grocock, 13 years, failed to win the Kiplingcotes Derby when her pony collapsed and died a few yards from the finishing post.

On 15th March 2001, Farmer Stephen Crawford was the only participant in the Kiplingcotes Derby, due to foot and mouth disease. Course clerk Sue Hillaby appealed to people to stay away.

Kiplingcotes
East Yorkshire monuments – the country’s oldest horse race at Kiplingcotes. The winner’s prize is worth less than 2nd prize.

March 11th

bearward

On 11th March 1214, Hawise, Countess of Aumale and heir of the Seigniory of Holderness, died single, having been widowed 3 times.  In 1212, she refused to marry for a 4thtime, for which she had to pay a fine to King John of 5,000 marks (about £1700) (some sources say she died before 8.3.1214)

On 11th March 1296, John Romanus (John le Romaine) Archbishop of York, died aged about 66 in the Archbishop’s Palace, Bishop Burton; he was buried in York Minster. He protected poor villagers in 1286 by ordering his parish priests in Holderness not to demand tithes from those earning 5shillings a year or less.

On 11th March 1522, Beverley bearward John Grene was tried for slander, by calling Percevall Robson, draper, a ‘Scottish bird’. Grene apologised for speaking in anger, and was rebuked and forgiven by Robson.

On 11th March 1616, Father Thomas Atkinson was hanged, drawn and quartered at York Castle at the age of 70. Born in the East Riding and trained in Douai as a Catholic priest, Atkinson spent 30 years as an itinerant priest in the Howden area, ministering to local Catholics, and hiding in their homes. He was captured in the Vavasour house in Willitoft. He was beatified 1987. A young man at the execution bought the priest’s stockings from the hangman, as a holy relic. Identified as a Catholic, he was imprisoned.

On 11th March 1858, Brother John of the Yorkshire Catholic Reformatory took some boys, for a treat, to slide on the ice-covered Market Weighton Canal; 5 boys fell through and, attempting to save them, he also fell through the ice. They all had to be rescued by passing bargemen.

On 11th March 1859 at 6a.m., ostler John Sissons was found hanged in one of the stables of the George & Dragon Inn, Aldbrough. He was described as an aged man of respectable family. The inquest verdict was of suicide due to temporary insanity.

February 10th

On 10th February 1644, Sir William Constable of Flamborough led Parliamentary troops from Hull in routing the Royalists at Kilham.

On 10th February 1801, Sir Samuel Standidge, aged 75, died at Thorngumbald. He was born at Bridlington, and at age 19 was taken prisoner by privateers and taken to Rhode Island. Later in life he traded goods to Rhode Island and bought lands in Holderness, building New York Farm, Preston, to mark his financial success in New York.  He is credited with restarting the Hull whaling industry, acting as master of his own whaler.  Sheriff of Hull, Mayor, and warden of Hull Trinity House 5 times. His memorial is  in St Mary’s Lowgate, Hull.

On 10th February 1866, 6 days after running aground on the Isle of Juist, Germany, 15 people were rescued from the rigging of the ‘Excelsior’ of Hull, where they survived without food and water. Mrs Newton was considered a hero for her support of her fellow survivors.

On 10th February 1871, at least 70 mariners lost their lives in Bridlington Bay in the Great Gale, including 6 lifeboatmen. 23 vessels were lost. There is a mass grave in the Bridlington Priory churchyard, and an annual Fishermen’s Service was held for 100 years.

On 10th February 1893, Revd Francis Orpen Morris died aged 82 at Nunburnholme. Vicar at Nafferton 1844-1854, rector of Nunburnholme to 1893. Irish-born naturalist and author of children’s books, and books on natural history and architecture. Anti-feminist, anti-hunting and opposed to Darwinism. (b25.3.1810)

On 10th February 1898, Commander Cave, of Humber guard ship Galatea, rescued the crew of SS Marbella in the River Humber, near Humber Dock, Hull. The Marbella had problems with its steering gear, and almost collided with 2 ships before hitting the Galatea. The only passenger had to swim to safety, and the Marbella’s cargo of 41 horses were all lost. The Galatea was itself later stranded on the Hebbles sandbank, but refloated later.

Saml Standidge memorial

January 23rd

On 23rd January 1221, William de Forz II, Count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness, was excommunicated for the second time, for rebelling against the King, fortifying castles which were not his, and failing to fulfil a vow to go on crusade.

On 23rd January 1803, Burnett’s Shipping List reported 5 ships arriving in Hull from London that day; the Hope had lost an anchor and cable, and the Manchester had lost an anchor. 2 ships sailed for Yarmouth, 1 for Shields, and 1 for London.

On 23rd January 1908, Hubert Nicholson was born in Washinton Street, Hull. He was a journalist, poet and novelist, best known for “Sunk Island’ 1956. He took holidays in the Holderness marshes, the strong attachment to the area being reflected in his writing.       d Epsom 11.1.1996 Commemorated by a blue plaque.

Hubert Nicholson

January 22nd

On 22nd January 1430, Katherine Brigham of Ganstead died at Preston aged 6 months. She had been sent by her family to a wet nurse with the Twyer family and was buried at St Sepulchre’s Hospital.

On 22nd January 1621, John Ramsay, a Scottish aristocrat, was created 1stand only Earl of Holderness by James I; he appears to have had no connection with Holderness.

On 22nd January 1643, Nicholas Osgodby, vicar of St Mary’s Beverley, left his post to join the Royalist army.

On 22nd January 1907, John (Jack) Symons died in Hull aged 83. He was the first Jew to hold public office in Hull; 1857 Guardian of the Poor, 1875 alderman, 1890 Sheriff; a local historian with many publications, including ‘Hullinia’ and ‘Kingstoniana’.

 

St Mary's Beverley