February 1st

On 1st February 1639, King Charles I issued an order to enclose Hull and improve its fortifications.

On 1st February 1714, a great wind caused damage in several places, and blew down Richard Stevenson’s house in Kilpin, then the fire in the hearth destroyed the remains.

On 1st February 1884, at the Hull Sanitary Congress, Hull City Hall, Rev Joseph Malet Lambert called for bold action to save hundreds of lives, and improve thousands more, by dealing with dreadful housing conditions, some of them a stone’s throw from the City Hall. The slums were cleared 20 years later.

On 1st February 1893, Hedon Gymnastic Society put on an ‘Assault-at-Arms’, with an appearance by a clown, and followed by a dance in the Board School room, Roos.

On 1st February 1922, Robert Anderson, 26 of 7 Emily Terrace, Gillett St was lost with 9 shipmates when Hull trawler Magneta was wrecked off Murmansk, under Russian arrest.

On 1st February 1983, 800 dignitaries, service representatives and families of the Norland crew gathered at the King George Dock Terminal Building, Hull. They were there to greet the return of North Sea Ferries Norland after over 9 months in the Falklands War supporting the troops. Unfortunately, 90 mph winds did not allow the ship to dock, and it rode out the storm in the Humber for several hours , by which time the banquet was over.  Hundreds of people were still there to greet them at the quayside in the evening. The Norland was refurbished and returned to the Rotterdam run on 20thApril.

Norland return

January 28th

On 28th January 1450, William de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, was arrested and imprisoned for treason. King Henry VI saved him from execution and banished him for 5 years. On his way to Calais, he was captured and reportedly had his head cut off with a rusty sword.

On 28th January 1515, William Jakson of Belby, near Howden, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of John (rest of name blank in the register).

On 28th January 1525, Robert Smyth, husbandman of Anlaby, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of Robert Ekopp alias Hikkopp.

On 28th January 1700, Abraham de la Pryme, curate of Holy Trinity, Hull, reported of Swine that: ‘the town has formerly been very large and handsome, … though it is very mean and inconsiderable, nobody inhabiting the same but a few country clowns’.

On 28th January 1829, William Hurr of Roos was admitted to the Sculcoates Refuge for Pauper Lunatics; on 21 July that year his funeral is recorded.

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December 30th

wars-of-the-roses

On 30th December 1460, Richard Hanson, mayor of Hull, died at the battle of Wakefield, in the Wars of the Roses, fighting on the Lancastrian side. image copyright threetwoone.org

On 30th December 1872, David Tong, apprentice blacksmith, was charged at Roos Petty Sessions with absconding from his employer’s service. He had worked for James Blenkin of Roos, blacksmith and machine maker, for 5 years, and his labour was worth £1 per week. Tong made no complaint of any kind against his master, and was ordered by JPs Sir Talbot C. Constable and Rev C.J. Wall to return and pay costs.

December 24th

Coat_of_arms_of_the_baron_de_Ros_-_Premier_baron_of_England

On 24th December 1264, Robert de Ros of Roos and Helmsley was created Baron de Ros, probably the first English Barony created, and the title holder is styled the Premier Baron of England.

On 24th December 1510, Welwick labourer James Martynson claimed sanctuary at the church of St John for the murder of John Lewes of Welwickthorpe, labourer.

On 24th December 1592, the Council in the North ordered that no merchants carry goods or merchandise up the river or trade with other parts of the north except through the port of Hull.

On 24th December 1911, James Adamson, 34, deckhand, was lost overboard from Hull trawler Eldorado, 250 miles ENE of Spurn.

 

 

December 23rd

On 23rd December 1226, Robert ‘Furfan’ de Ros, of Roos, died, aged about 54. 1stLord of Helmsley, son-in-law of the Scottish king William the Lion, a Knight Templar and one of the barons enforcing the Magna Carta. His tomb is in the Temple church, London.

On 23rd December 1510, Peter Swake and Roland Dale of Catton claimed sanctuary at the church of St Cuthbert, Durham, as accessories to homicide. About 25.11.1510, they were present when Richard Horsley of Catton was taken from his mother’s house in Catton to a field, where he received several wounds, from which he died about a month later. They feared being  indicted as accessories. On 5.7.1511, another Catton man, William Ratcliff, entered the sanctuary with the same story, although he had taken sanctuary in Beverley for the homicide the previous year.

On 23rd December 1535, Austin Tennant of Hull claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for homicide and felony (details not recorded).  On the same day, the sanctuary received another 4 fugitives, from Leeds, Wakefield, and Thornton and Tealby in Lincs, 3 for felony and 1 for debt.

On 23rd December 1640, Sir John Lister died in Hull, aged 53. He left land at Thorngumbald to provide income for the poor, and money to set up the almshouses known as Lister’s Hospital. Twice Mayor of Hull, and MP, he built the house now known as Wilberforce House. He is commemorated in Holy Trinity church, where he also left money for repairs.

On 23rd December 1689, Johannes Frederick Bellow, a Danish trooper, was executed in Beverley Market Place for killing fellow soldier Daniel Straker, in a duel. Both are buried in St Mary’s churchyard.

On 23rd December 1732, a hurricane removed the roof and steeple of Hornsea church, destroyed 24 houses and overturned a windmill, and interrupted the parish clerk in the act of concealing smuggled goods in the crypt of the church.

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October 30th

de Ros arms

On 30th October 1472, an inquisition post mortem was called to verify the date of birth of Eleanor de Roos, of Breighton, daughter of Sir Robert Roos, in relation to inherited lands. George Layburn confirmed that she was born 55 years earlier, on 30thSeptember, a date he remembered because on the day of her birth one John Forder, fisherman, at Bryghton, in the water of Derwent, netted a big fish, of great length, with a head like a dog’s. 

On 30th October 1833, John Brown, 35, died in a field near Withernwick, during a prize fight against William Hackney, oyster vendor of Hull.  Brown, 18 lbs lighter than Hackney and 11 years older, fell after 1 hour and 36 minutes, in the 65thround, before 4p.m., and died at 10p.m. Hackney, his second Thomas Wilkinson, and Brown’s second, William Thompson, were found guilty at the inquest of wilful murder. A court had earlier found Thompson not guilty, and Hackney and Wilkinson guilty of manslaughter, and both were sentenced to 4 month’s hard labour at Beverley House of Correction.

On 30th October 2017, the Trustees of the Nafferton Feoffees Charities Trust submitted their annual report on a charity which originated with a bequest to the local poor from Thomas Robinson in 1698, and continued since that time, with additional bequests as recent as 1950.

 

October 21st

On 21st October 1823, Mr Gleadow, commander of the customs cutter Bee, seized 31,324 barrels of contraband, including 250 lbs of tea, 720 lbs of tobacco, and 976 gallons of spirits, mostly gin, from the Lunatic asylum, Brandesburton Moor.

On 21st October 1904, the Gamecock trawler fleet from Hull was fired on by the Russian Baltic fleet, claiming they mistook them for the Japanese Navy. The trawler Crane was sunk and her captain and second mate killed; 30 others were injured. There is a memorial statue to the ‘Russian Outrage’ at the corner of Boulevard/Hessle Road.

On 21st October 1905, Ellen Borrill, of William’s Terrace, Hull, was murdered at Danthorpe by Peter Williams, her partner. He cut her throat in a field, walked to Burton Pidsea, and then gave himself up to the police at Roos. He claimed she had tried to kill herself, and asked him to finish her off. On 2nd December, Williams was sentenced to death, but was reprieved.

On 21st October 1921, Jim Graham and Cam Connor, out of work shipwrights from South Shields, bought a 14-seater Model T. Ford and set up Easington’s first bus service, just 2 years after East Yorkshire’s first bus service was set up in Elloughton by E.J. Lee, also using a 14-seater Model T.

Russian Outrage