July 22nd

On 22nd July  1612 ( or possibly on 12.7) Hull-born navigator and explorer James Hall was employed by the Danish government to survey for minerals, and came upon a group of Greenland Inuit who recognised him from a previous voyage. He had been involved in kidnapping 4 people, who had never returned home. Hall was attacked and died that day of a spear wound in the side. William Baffin was master of the sister ship Patience on the same expedition. Hall was succeeded as master of the Heartsease by Andrew Barker, also of Hull.

On 22nd July 1643, Lord Ferdinando Fairfax was invited by the people of Hull to take up the post of Governor.

On 22nd July 1869, Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, later Edward VII, officially opened the new Albert Dock, Hull.

On 22nd July 1909, Sydney Buxton, Postmaster General, officially opened the new Post Office building in Lowgate, Hull. Despite precautions against action by suffragettes, Charlotte Marsh got close enough to speak to him, and was arrested. She was Yorkshire organiser for the Women’s Social & Political Union and had earlier been arrested at Riverside Quay.

On 22nd July 2004, Florence ‘Flo’ Bilton died aged 82. Goalkeeper, set up a women’s football team at Reckitt’s in 1963, and from  was influential in setting up the Women’s Football Association in 1969. Set up, trained and supported new women’s teams. Acted as membership secretary and chaperone for the national women’s team. Flo Bilton Trophy is contested by girls’ football teams in ER. (b c1921) photo shows 2017 cream plaque presentation in Hull Guildhall by (left) Karen Walker, 86 England caps.

flo bilton

July 17th

On 17th July 1882, deckhand John Fryer, 18, was lost overboard from Hull trawler Superb in the North Sea.

On 17th July 1930, Amy Johnson sent a telegram to Ethel Leginska congratulating her on her brilliant pioneer achievement in conducting the Carl Rosa Opera Company’s production of Madame Butterfly  in London.

amy-leginska telegram

July 13th

On 13th July 1496, Bartholomew Pereson of Driffield claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the murder of John Elyot.

On 13th July 1854, 3 men and a boy drowned when they fell off the Dowthorpe as it was being launched. About 300 people had boarded the ship before the launch, and deliberately rocked the boat. Many fell into the water and 4 drowned. A tug “Ann Scarborough’ was capsized by the number of people trying to board her from the water.

On 13th July 1936, Oswald Mosley, leader of British Union of Fascists,  found himself unable to book a hall in Hull. Mosley planned to give a speech in Corporation Fields, to recruit blackshirts to his organisation, but they were met with a large and hostile group of local people, and a riot ensued. Mosley was not able to give his speech.

On 13th July 1951, a fire broke out in No 1 Shed, Humber Dock, Hull, destroying £100,000’s worth of cargo awaiting shipping. The probable cause was said to be a discarded cigarette, and made worse by a gas leak.

Dowthorpe July 1854?

 

July 12th

On 12th July 1537, Robert Aske of Aughton was hanged in chains outside Cliffords Tower, York, after being convicted of treason in Westminster, as the leader of the Pilgrimage of Grace.

On 12th July 1641, Sir Thomas Glemham resigned his post as Governor of Hull, having only been appointed the previous year.

On 12th July 1714, Elizabeth Hodgson, a single woman of Hedon, was sentenced at Hedon Quarter Sessions to be stripped to the waist and whipped with birch or willows from the Town Hall to Harrison Lane and from there to the jail and to remain in jail at hard labour until ‘sufficient security’ was found for her good behaviour. Her crime was to give birth to her 4thillegitimate child. There is no record of any punishment for the father. An Act of 1792 forbade whipping females for any reason whatsoever.

On 12th July 1826, (in one of the driest summers on record) Hessle banker Joseph Robinson Pease recorded in his diary there was no grass for the cattle, who had to be given linseed cake. Ponds and water tanks dry.  Around this time, too, the pond at Fridaythorpe dried up, and villagers went on a Sunday to nearby Fimber to take water from one of their 2 ponds, resulting in a pitched battle, referred to as ‘the Second Battle of Waterloo’. photo shows the remaining village pond at Fimber.

fimber pond.JPG

July 10th

On 10th July 1157, Eustace FitzJohn, Lord of Alnwick, died this day.  He acquired substantial lands in the north, and married into the ER family of de Vescy. Fought on the Scottish side in the Battle of the Standard in 1138. Founded priories in Bridlington, Watton and North Ferriby.

On 10th July 1508, John Tod of Swine claimed sanctuary at the church of St Cuthbert, Durham, for the theft of a horse and 5 marks from chaplain N. Dale, the steward of the Lord of Hastings, and also for debt. As he claimed the theft happened 10 years earlier, presumably the debt concerned him more.

On 10th July 1642, Sir John Meldrum arrived in Hull by boat with 500 Parliamentary troops, and money, to support the town being besieged in the 1st siege of Hull. A further 1,500 troops were sent later.

On 10th July 1869, Mr Tasker of Sheffield was found guilty at Bridlington of shooting 28 protected seabirds, and fined 2s6d for each bird killed, plus 9s costs.

On 10th July 1931, Paul Robeson, singer, actor and political activist,  performed at Bridlington Spa Royal Hall on his first trip to Yorkshire,  receiving several encores; when the Royal Hall re-opened after refurbishment in 1933, he returned to Bridlington.

gannets

July 6th

On 6th July 1381, William Haldene of Beverley had his brains literally knocked out by John Erghom and others, with a pole-axe, 2 battle-axes, 6 swords, 2 forks and other weapons, before his body was thrown into the beck in Walker Lane.

On 6th July 1382, Sir Michael de la Pole leased to John de Hedersee and John of Dimlington land in Myton which included arable land, pasture and at least 30 acres of meadow, with houses, sheepfolds, 600 sheep and 160 lambs. Myton was clearly very rural then.

On 6th July 1537, the body of Sir Robert Constable of Flamborough was displayed on Beverley Gate, Hull, after he was hanged for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace, despite having been pardoned the previous year.

On 6th July 1538, Hull agreed to give a place in the Charterhouse to the wife of a blind man named Ralph, as his carer during his lifetime, taking up a place normally reserved for a man.

On 6th July 1642, Robert & Christopher Hildyard of Winestead, Francis Cobbe of Ottringham, and 300 other Holderness people met King Charles I at Keyingham and handed him a petition against Sir John Hotham’s actions in flooding farmland and taking livestock into Hull. The King was visiting The Providence, which had landed arms from Holland. The King sympathised, but said he could do nothing except raise troops, as he had no power to control Hotham.

On 6th July 1644, the Hull Committee of Sequestrations formally adjudged alderman James Watkinson a delinquent, 2 years after he left Hull to join the Royalist army, and they ordered that his post as alderman be filled by election.

On 6th July 1901, G.E. Conrad Naewiger complained in a letter to the Hull Daily Mail of the lack of steps to Aldbrough beach, a popular destination for works outings from Hull. photo shows Aldbrough cliff.

On 6th July 1910, Arthur Geoffrey Dickens was born in Hull. Professor of History at the University of Hull, he was elected Fellow of the British Academy. Considered the leading historian of the Reformation of his time. Awarded the Order of Merit by the German Government. (died 31.7.2001)

On 6th July 1921, Tilworth Grange was opened to ‘Female mental defectives’ (people with learning disabilities), the first provision in Hull for people who previously were sent to institutions in Bristol, Chesterfield and Ormskirk. Winestead Hall was bought in 1931 for men.

 

erosion aldboro.JPG

July 1st

On 1st July 1643, cannoneer John Stevenson was buried in St Mary’s Beverley, having died in the town in a ‘great scrimmage’ in the Civil War (possibly the day before).

On 1st July 1801, Hull Subscription Mill Ltd opened to provide cheap flour to the poor of Hull, 3 years or so after the opening of Hull Anti-Mill, one of the first co-operatives in the country.

On 1st July 1830, the Hull whaler Eagle had been stuck in the ice of Baffin Bay for 5 days.   With the help of 200 men from nearby ships, Captain Matthew Wright and crew, were finally able to repair the keel and heave the ship upright again.

On 1st July 1903, Amy Johnson was born in St George’s Road, Hull. She went on to become the first woman to fly solo to Australia, and to break many aviation records. (d5.1.1941)

On 1st July 1918, Hull coroner Colonel Alfred Thorney held inquests on 2 early cases in the flu epidemic: Kate Denman, aged 11, daughter of a labourer of Hodgson Street, and Elsie Barton, aged 9, daughter of a soldier, of Arthur’s Terrace Courtney Street. Both died within 24 hours of being taken ill, of influenza followed by pneumonia.

On 1st July 1940, the first-ever daylight air-raid on the British mainland attacked Saltend oil terminal.  Between 16.40 and 17.00, bombs caused a 2,500-ton tank of oil to explode, and threatened to spread to other tanks. For preventing even greater damage, the following were all awarded the George Medal: Clifford Turner, leading fireman; William Sigsworth, Manager, Anglo-American Oil Co Ltd; George Samuel Sewell, engineer, Shell-Mex & BP Ltd; Jack Owen, fireman; George Archibald Howe, Manager, Shell-Mex & BP Ltd. No loss of life.

On 1st July 1976, Withernsea Lighthouse ceased operating, after 82 years, having been superseded by modern navigational aids. It is now open to the public as a museum to Kay Kendall, to local history and the lifeboat service.Withernsea

June 23rd

Ezekiel Rogers window

Ezekiel Rogers window, Rowley church.

On 23rd June 1660, Reverend Ezekiel Rogers died aged 70, in Rowley, Massachusetts, after 22 years as vicar of a new Puritan settlement.  The new town was named after Rowley in East Yorkshire, from where he led a group of about 100 Puritans to America in June 1638. Became Rector of Rowley in 1621, aged 31, and served there for 17 years. (b 1590 in Wethersfield, Essex)

On 23rd June 1766, Sara Jenkinson, the infant daughter of Richard Jenkinson of Hutton Cranswick, fell from a little girl’s arms and died within 30 minutes. There was a coroner’s inquest.

On 23rd June 1768, John Courtney, aged 34, gentleman, of Beverley, married Mary Jesse Smelt, aged 24, at St Mary’s, Lowgate. The bride dressed in a white ‘night gown’ and white hat, the groom in a white suit. Only family and servants attended the church and family members dined with them afterwards. The bells of both churches rang for them. They returned to their future home in Beverley in the evening. In his diary, John refers to his future wife at all times as ‘Miss Smelt’.

On 23rd June 1787, the Clerk to the Beverley to Driffield Turnpike Trust wrote to T. Baxter, the owner of Bell Mills, Sunderlandwick, threatening him with prosecution if he allowed anyone to cross his land to avoid paying tolls. 2 months later the Trust asked T. Baxter to lock the gate near his mill, and to prosecute anyone who broke it down.

On 23rd June 1812, Major-General Barnard Foord Bowes of Cowlam was wounded at Battle of Badajoz, but recovered to fight at Salamanca.

On 23rd June 1848, Uckaluk died of measles aboard the Hull ship Truelove, on their way home to Nyadlik, Greenland. She and her husband Memiadluk had visited England to highlight the poor conditions in their homeland.  They took part in talks in Manchester and York. 

On 23rd June 1853, Captain John (or Thomas) Bowlby set sail for Cumberland Sound in the Arctic with 3 ships, with the aim of forming a settlement there; they took goats and building materials. The surgeon on the trip was William Gedney, who had been on board the Truelove with Captain Parker in 1847.

On 23rd June 1898, Winifred Holtby was born at Rudston. Social reformer, novelist and journalist, she was famous and respected for her work in South Africa and elsewhere. ‘South Riding’ became her most famous novel, published after her death. She is buried in Rudston. (d 29.9.1935)

June 21st

On 21st June 1366, Sir William de la Pole died. The first Mayor of Hull, knighted by Edward III, was lord of Myton. He acquired some land just outside Hull where there was a college of 6 secular priests. They were replaced by Franciscans, then Sir William pulled down the buildings and built a hospital. Then he introduced Poor Clare nuns and poor people, but did not live to complete his plans. His son Michael introduced Carthusian monks, and the Charterhouse came into being.

On 21st June 1535, Winestead priest Christopher Michell told his congregation to recognise the Pope as head of the church, in spite of instructions to honour Henry VIII as Supreme Head of the English Church. Michell was jailed in Beverley.

On 21st June 1643, John Pym reported to Parliament on the actions of Capt John Hotham, in charge of troops near Newark, who had allowed his men to harass and steal from local people, turned a gun on Cromwell, and generally acted insolently and in an undisciplined way, and was also suspected of communicating secretly with the Queen. Later, Hotham escaped from prison.

On 21st June 1908, Hull women hired a special train to London for a “Women’s Sunday” rally organised by the WSPU, attended by 300,000 to 500,000; the Hull contingent is said to be the largest from any provincial society.

On 21st June 1915, children from Mappleton School went to Rolston Camp to see the troops depart for France; they marched to Hornsea train station.

On 21st June 1918, Edward Vere Wright was born in Elloughton. Amateur archaeologist and palaeontologist, he found the first of the 4,000 year old Ferriby boats, with his brother Claude in 1937. In 1940, Ted found a 2ndboat, and with his son Roderick in 1963, a 3rdboat. (d 18.5.2010) photo shows a model of one of the boats in Hull & ER Museum.

On 21st June 1993, Hilary Catherine Brown of Tibthorpe died aged 13. (born Bolzano 12.9.1979) Hilary wrote this verse, which is written on her gravestone in Kirkburn church: The storm finished, the night diminished, the day progressed, bringing a sparkling dawn.

 

Ferriby boat model ERmuseum

June 19th

On 19th June 1256, the Meaux Abbey chronicler reported losing men and oxen at Orwithfleet, south of Patrington. A major flood of the Humber reached as far north as Cottingham, with many lives lost, livestock and fisheries devastated, and land washed into the river.

On 19th June 1607, Thomas Wincop, Master of Hull Charterhouse, bought, with Hull Mayor George Almond and other trustees, land in Haltemprice Wood abutting on the common fields of Willerby, to support the running costs; the Charterhouse already owned substantial property in and around Hull. photo shows Wincop’s memorial in Hull Minster.

On 19th June 1837, Hull Steam Packet Company launched the paddle steamer Victoria at Medley’s shipyard, Hull; she was considered state of the art. A boiler explosion in 1838 killed 5 crew; there was a second explosion the same year; she ran onto rocks in 1852 and was wrecked, with 8 people killed.

On the same day, Rev Joseph Coltman died in Beverley at the age of 60. He was known for his support of local charities, of the emancipation of Catholics, and of the abolition of slavery. Born in Hull, Coltman Street was named for him, as was Beverley’s Coltman Avenue. At 37 stone 8lbs, he was reputed to be the heaviest man in England, and his death may have been caused by his weight. He employed a manservant to turn him in bed, but he fell asleep and Coltman suffocated in his sleep.

On 19th June 1887, to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Jubilee, a state service was held in Holy Trinity church, Hull, the new Market Hall was opened, as was East Park, and there were festivities in all the city’s wards.

On 19th June 1920, Harry Wilkinson of  Lower Union Street, Hull, was seriously injured by 3 gunshots.  He was part of a mob of white people who attacked and damaged several boarding houses where black seamen lived. Tom Toby, a West African fireman, was charged with wounding, but no white people were arrested. Toby’s plea of self defence was accepted, and he was found not guilty. During the same rioting, Murrell Piggott, faced with a 200-strong crowd, had also fired, but his plea of self defence was not accepted, and he was sentenced to 9 months’ hard labour for unlawful wounding.

On 19th June 1940, the East Hull, docks, suburbs, and River Hull corridor experienced the first night-time raid of World War 2.

 

Thomas Whincopp memorial