April 18th

On 18th April 1801, Hull Trinity House gave financial support to 7 mariners who had returned home after being taken prisoner in the war against the French.

On 18th April 1864, Hull Mayor John Lumsden called a public meeting in Hull Town Hall, Lowgate. The topic was a petition to invite the Italian  nationalist General Garibaldi to Hull. He was in England, but unable to come to Hull, and returned to fight in Italy.

On 18th April 1911, Francis Frederick Johnson, was born in Bridlington, where he lived all his life. An architect, his early work was mostly local, and he did much restoration work on country houses. His work was increasingly recognised nationally and internationally, and he worked up to his death aged 84. He was awarded the CBE, for work including St Margaret’s Hilston; St Michael & All Angels, Orchard Park; Winestead Rectory restoration; Cottingham Rectory. Many of the buildings he designed were given listed status in 2017. He is buried at Reighton with his life partner, Edward Ingram, local historian.  (d 29.9.1995) photo shows Hilston church

On 18th April 1932, the Thorpe Enquiry into land deals on Hull Council reported its findings that Sir Digby Willoughby (who had committed suicide the month before), Alderman Francis Finn, and builder Robert Tarran, were involved in corrupt land deals.

hilston church & tower.JPG

March 31st

Andrew Marvell

On 31st March 1621, Andrew Marvell was born in Winestead to local vicar Andrew Marvell, who later became Master of Hull Charterhouse. Marvell junior was a renowned poet, and MP for Hull several times. During the Civil War, he travelled in Europe, prompting some to suggest he was employed as an English spy. He acted as London agent for Hull Trinity House. Died in Hull 1678, and is buried in St Giles in the Fields, London

On 31st March 1801, Captain Mitchinson, of the Hull whaler Blenheim, was found not guilty of the murder of 2 members of the Press Gang, (John Burnick and John Sykes) his defence being that he was handcuffed and locked in his cabin at the time. Burnick and Sykes were buried in Drypool Cemetery.

On 31st March 1941, having just completed a successful campaign for blood donors, Dr David Diamond, Deputy Medical Officer for Hull, was killed instantly when a land mine made a direct hit on the Shell Mex Building, Ferensway, the ARP Headquarters. A heavy raid on the docks destroyed offices, a garage, works, houses, dog kennels and warehouses at Albert, Alexandra, Town and Victoria Docks. A total of 200 deaths was recorded in March.

hull-blitz-shell-mex

March 27th

On 27th March 1349, an earthquake was recorded at Meaux and in Beverley, as in much of Eastern England. The monks were at prayer, and had reached the 2ndverse of Psalm 60 – ‘Thou hast made the earth to tremble; Thou hast broken it’.

On 27th March 1570, Thomas Bishop of Pocklington was tried at York Castle, and hanged, drawn and quartered for his part in the Northern Catholic rebellion against Queen Elizabeth. Anthony Langdale of Sancton escaped to Rome, and others may have fled to exile in Paris.

On 27th March 1575, Frederick Gottfried, aged 37, of Hull, was convicted of coining guineas and hanged in York.

On 27th March 1634, Mr Vavasour of Hesslewood (we don’t know if this was Thomas, 1stbaronet, Walter, 2ndbart, or another) was riding past Micklegate Bar in York when he saw moving earth, and helped convicted felon John Bartendale out of his grave. Bartendale was a travelling musician, who had been tried, hanged and buried. He was returned to prison, and at the next Assizes was given a full pardon.

On 27th March 1679, Mary Trot the daughter of Angel Trot died in infancy in Ellerker, and was buried, even though her father was a pauper, in a woollen shroud, following an Act passed to protect the woollen trade.

On 27th March 1615, Marmaduke Stutt of South Frodingham was buried in Winestead Lane after drowning whilst walking along the road.

On 27th March 1799, George Pycock died in Hull aged 50. He was the principal architect and builder in Hull at the time. He built Mytongate jail, the Infirmary, Prospect St, and St Giles Church, Marfleet. His only surviving building is the Neptune Inn, Whitefriargate.  (b1749)

Neptune Inn

March 17th

Kiplingcotes

On 17th March 1646, Henry Hildyard of Winestead was fined £4,660 as a Royalist (a ‘delinquent’) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament. (He had been a  Colonel of the trained bands which formed King Charles’ bodyguard for about 2 weeks in 1642, then retired to Surrey for the rest of the war). The fine was later reduced by half in payment for Hull Manor House which had belonged to him and which Parliament had given to the town of Hull.

On 17th March 1930, Judith Patricia (Pat) Albeck was born in Hull to Polish migrant parents. She was an award-winning designer of textiles and ceramics, known for her work for the National Trust. She is commemorated in Hull with a cream plaque. (d 2.9.2017)

On 17th March 1945, a cinema queue outside the Savoy Cinema, Holderness Road, Hull (the site is now Boyes store) was bombed and strafed; 12 people were killed, 22 wounded.

On 17th March 1966, Barbara Foster fFailed to win the Kiplingcotes Derby when her horse collapsed and died.

Pat Albeck

 

March 10th

Holy Trinity

On 10th March 1425, Hull Holy Trinity Church, was consecrated; building began in 1291 and was interrupted by the Black Death.

On 10th March 1447, Henry VI issued a charter enlarging the county of Hull to include Hessle, North Ferriby, Swanland, West Ella, Kirk Ella, Tranby, Willerby, Wolfreton, Anlaby, the site of Haltemprice Priory and Derringham Dike.

On 10th March 1623, George Tummond, butcher, of Patrington, was found dying at sunrise in Winestead, after starting to walk home from the alehouse in Ottringham. Holderness was notorious for its floods.

On 10th March 1800, George Hudson, the “Railway King’, was born in Howsham.  He  made a great business and political career from sharp practice and bribery (was MP for Sunderland, and Lord Mayor of York). He became hugely rich, but was disgraced, and imprisoned for debt, though released when his debts were paid by public subscription. In 1845, he bought the Londesborough Estate for £470,000. D14.12.1871

On 10th March 1823, John Bacchus Dykes was born in Hull. By the age of 10, was assistant organist at St John’s Church, Myton. Became a vicar, and composed over 300 hymn tunes, including ‘Eternal Father, Strong to Save’ and ‘We plough the fields and scatter’. (d 22.1.1876)

On 10th March 1921, Mr J.H. Tate proposed a motion at Hornsea Golf Club that ’Old Jack be shot’! It is assumed Old Jack was the horse used to pull mowers and rollers on the course.

On 10th March 1954, Alex May, master of the tug Fenman, died in hospital after the tug was overrun by the ship she was towing, the Rudolf, and sank, on the way into Hull’s Alexandra Dock. 2 of the crew were swept away. There was 1 survivor.

February 17th

On 17th February 1646, Christopher Hildyard of Winestead was fined £109 as a former Lieut – Col in the Royalist army (a ‘delinquent’) in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament.

On 17th February 1803, Burnett’s Daily Shipping List recorded that no ships arrived or departed in Hull on that day (apart from the ferry to Barton).

On 17th February 1821, Robert Sharp junior, an unemployed bricklayer’s labourer from Hull, gave evidence in the hearing of a petition in the House of Commons. Colonel John Baillie, MP for Hedon, was accused of bribery and corruption in the 1820 election. Sharp claimed to have spent the 2 weeks prior to election day at the Charles Saunders Inn (now the Shakespeare), eating and drinking at the expense of the candidate and finally, on election day, receiving 2 guineas from James Iveson, Baillie’s agent, for making himself ‘generally useful’.  William Mason also gave evidence of being offered 12 guineas by James Iveson, political agent for Col John Baillie, if he would vote for him. Baillie’s election was confirmed.

On 17th February 1961, Angela Eagle, MP and Maria Eagle MP were born in Bridlington. The Labour MPs are the first set of twins to sit in the House of Commons.

Eagle MPs copy

 

 

November 8th

 

 

Gunpowder Plot memorial
Welwick

On 8th November 1481, Thomas Nevyll, yeoman of Skirlaugh, sought sanctuary in Durham Cathedral for killing John Hewlins of Rise on 1stNovember.

On 8th November 1500, William Thorpp of Welwick, John Dorand and a man named Nicholas were in Winestead when their dog entered the park; they asked the parkers to return the dog, but they refused, and were abusive. Nicholas shot one of the parkers named March, in the neck with an arrow; he died about 10 days later. Thorpp travelled to Durham, where on 10.12 he claimed sanctuary, fearing he would be indicted as an accessory to murder.

On 8th November 1605, Jack and Kit Wright of Welwick, and brother-in-law Thomas Percy were fatally wounded at Holbeche House, Staffordshire, by the posse of 200 men led by the Sheriff of Warwick, Sir Richard Walsh. 9 of the 13 Gunpowder Plotters were at Holbeche, and they all died there; the other 4 were all executed.

On 8th November 1637, the Mayor of Hull petitioned the Privy Council that 1) the town was so poor as a result of the recent plague that it be let off the requirement to provide 2 warships for the Navy; 2) that the county’s funds help to support Hull’s poor and; 3) that Hull’s merchants be allowed to sell their goods elsewhere in the country again, now that the town was free of the plague. It was estimated that 2,000 people died in Hull, and perhaps as many left town.