January 23rd

On 23rd January 1221, William de Forz II, Count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness, was excommunicated for the second time, for rebelling against the King, fortifying castles which were not his, and failing to fulfil a vow to go on crusade.

On 23rd January 1803, Burnett’s Shipping List reported 5 ships arriving in Hull from London that day; the Hope had lost an anchor and cable, and the Manchester had lost an anchor. 2 ships sailed for Yarmouth, 1 for Shields, and 1 for London.

On 23rd January 1908, Hubert Nicholson was born in Washinton Street, Hull. He was a journalist, poet and novelist, best known for “Sunk Island’ 1956. He took holidays in the Holderness marshes, the strong attachment to the area being reflected in his writing.       d Epsom 11.1.1996 Commemorated by a blue plaque.

Hubert Nicholson

January 19th

 

Pilgr Grace

On 19th January 1537, Sir Francis Bigod was attacked by Ellerker’s men in Beverley, and most of his men were captured. After failing to capture Scarborough, he had gathered more followers at Bainton, but heard that John Hallam had failed to capture Hull. Bigod escaped to the north, and was eventually captured in March. Both Bigod and Hallam were executed.

On 19th January 1684, Sir Robert Hilyard, knight & Baron of Patrington, gave his son Capt Robert Hilyard ‘2 whole pues or closets, which were positioned in the South Transept’.

On 19th January 1970, Alan Plater oversaw the first production at the new theatre in Spring Street of his own play ‘Don’t Build a Bridge, Drain the River’, with music by Mike Chapman and Mike Waterson. The Humberside Arts Centre later became Humberside Theatre, and then Hull Truck Theatre. see photo

On 19th January 1979, William Rodgers, Secretary of State for Transport, reported in the House of Commons that as the result of an industrial dispute in the road haulage industry, there was no movement of grain or animal feed out of Hull docks. The importance of Hull was stressed, as other parts of the country depended on it to deliver goods.

On 19th January 2014, the Environment Agency closed Sutton Lock on the River Derwent to navigation due to safety concerns. The lock had been reconstructed in 1972 to enable pleasure craft to travel up to Stamford Bridge and give access to the Pocklington Canal. There seemed to be uncertainty as to who owned the gates and equipment.

Spring St theatre

December 29th

On 29th December 1594, Sir Francis and Lady Clifford began a tradition in their new house  (Londesborough Hall) of Christmas and New Year feasts, entertaining 93 staff and local people, tenants from different villages on the estate on different days, to meals until 6thJanuary.

On 29th January 1611, they paid for entertainment from visiting puppeteers, 2 men and a woman, who called at the great house.

On 29th December 1817, Mary Woodall married John Lewis Friday, private in the 33rd (WR) Regiment of Foot, a  Waterloo veteran, who was probably born in Mozambique.

On 29th December 1829, Hedon MP Col John Baillie informed the Mayor of Hedon that the Post Office would have a daily post from Hedon instead of 4 days a week.

On 29th December 1881,  William Papper, 15, was murdered aboard fishing smack Rising Sun, in the North Sea, by Osmond Otto Brand, skipper of the boat, after prolonged mistreatment amounting to torture. Brand was found guilty of murder at Leeds Assizes and sentenced to death. Richard Rycroft was sentenced to 3 months’ hard labour for assault.

On 29th December 1898, Elsa (formerly Elfie) Gidlow was born in Hull. Lesbian poet known for On A Grey Thread 1923. Her family emigrated to Canada when she was 6 (d 8.6.1986)

 

December 12th

On 12th December 1303, Hull burgess John Schayl left 20shillings in his will towards the rebuilding of Holy Trinity Church.

On 12th December 1659, James Primrose MD, aged 63, of Whitefriargate, Hull, signed his will, and died sometime in the same month. Raised and educated in France, related to James I’s principal surgeon and Scottish nobility. Prominent writer on medical matters, and highly respected Hull physician. Andrew Marvell referred to him in a poem. A religious nonconformist who was fined for non-attendance at church at least twice.

On 12th December 1895, Robin Pockley, coxswain of th eFlamborough lifeboat, saved the 3 crew of the fishing boat Elizabeth, who had been washed into the sea several miles off Flamborough Head; as there was not enough time to call out the lifeboat, he put out to sea with 2 colleagues in an ordinary fishing boat. He was awarded the RNLI silver medal.

On 12th December 1946, Barrie Rutter was born in Hull. Actor, director and founder of the Northern Broadsides theatre company; awarded OBE for services to drama. photo shows him (middle) in 2017 production of ‘Richard III’.

-Barrie-Rutter-Mat-Fraser

December 11th

Meaux Abbey Farm

 

On 11th December 1538, Ellerton Gilbertine Priory was dissolved and the monks pensioned off. Sir John Aske of Aughton was granted the monastic lands, part of which became the parish church and graveyard. I have no record of the fate of the 13 poor elderly men whom the priory hospital was created to house.

On 11th December 1539, the Abbot and monks of Meaux Abbey were pensioned off when the monastery was dissolved. The abbot retired to Skerne, and some of monks took up posts as curates in Welwick, Keyingham and Beeford. photo shows farm near the site

On 11th December 1647, priest John Saltmarsh, MA, died. Author, theologian, rector, deacon and Chaplain in the Parliamentary Army during the Civil War. Argued for religious toleration and liberty of conscience. Told Cromwell and Fairfax that God was angry with them for their treatment of the Levellers, and resigned his post with the Army. (b Saltmarsh date?)

On 11th December 1915, former Reckitt’s employee Private Edgar Winson was killed in action, serving with 10thBtn West Yorkshire Regiment. Born Spurn. No known grave.

 

December 2nd

On 2nd December 1614, a woman bone-setter from South Dalton set the leg of John the gardener at Londesborough House after he had broken it in a fall from a horse. The Earl of Cumberland paid the costs of his servants’ medical treatment.

On 2nd December 1847, Memiadluk and Uckaluk, of Cumberland Sound, Greenland, gave the first of several exhibitions of their traditional clothing, kayak and hunting equipment on their British trip to raise money and awareness of the plight of their people. Greenlanders were being encouraged to use modern hunting equipment, but supplies were irregular with no permanent British settlement. Photo shows their statues at the side of the River Hull.

On 2nd December 1985, Philip Larkin, poet and librarian, died in hospital in Cottingham of oesophageal cancer at the age of 63. Librarian, University of Hull 1955-85. CBE, Companion of Honour., Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry. (born 9.8.1922 Coventry)

 

truelove.JPG

November 20th

On 20th November 1893, the steamship Amcott was wrecked off Aldbrough with the loss of all 15 hands; a rider went 7 miles to Hornsea to bring the lifeboat, but too late to save the crew. One man tried to swim to shore, but was drowned before locals could reach him with a life-buoy.

On 20th November 1940, Hull PC Charles Christopher Winterbottom died aged 45, fatally injured when his cycle collided with a car at night in the blackout.

On 20th November 1943, Rev George Bramwell Evens, aka Romany, died aged 59.  Methodist preacher, author and radio presenter, broadcasting on BBC from 1933 until 1943. (Born 1884 at 3 Argyll St, Hull to a romani mother)

 

'Romany'