June 16th

On 16th June 1487, John de la Pole, Earl of Lincoln, died aged 22 (or 25), in the Battle of Stoke (near Newark) fighting against Henry VII, attempting to place Lambert Simnel on the English throne.

On 16th June 1793, the 42nd Regiment of Highlanders in Hull and 200 soldiers were sent to service at Fish Street Congregational Chapel.

On 16th June 1872, Sarah Stickney Ellis died aged 73.  A Quaker turned Congregationalist, she was a prolific author, and advocate of women’s education. (Born 1799 at Ridgmont, Burstwick)

On 16th June 2012, Hull-born Joe Longthorne, a singer of Romani heritage, was awarded an MBE for services to charity. (b31.5.1955)

 

joe longthorne

 

June 12th

On 12th June 1780, William Wilberforce wrote ‘We were alarmed last night at Hull by a mob which burnt the Catholic chapel and attempted to pull down a private house’; the house belonged to Reginald Williams. One report said Mrs Williams and family had to be escorted out of town by guards.

On 12th June 1799, Capt Angus Sadler and the crew of the whaler Molly returned to port after a voyage of 87 days, with 11 whales, 300 butts of blubber and 5 tons of bone. This was the earliest recorded return to Hull of a whaler; they generally returned in July or August, but in any event not later than 11 October, for Hull Fair. photo shows the whalebone arch at Patrington.

On 12th June 1984, Sydney Herbert Smith, MP, died aged 99. Newsagent, Methodist lay preacher and Hull socialist MP; stood down after 5 years to return to local government; Alderman, Honorary Doctor of Laws, Honorary Freeman of the city and Life Member of the University Court. Endowed the Alderman Sydney Smith Lecture at Hull University, now associated with WISE.

whalebone arch Pat.JPG

 

June 8th

On 8th June 1300, a year after Hull’s establishment, King Edward I gave a charter to allow the mayor and aldermen to pave the major streets, with a central gutter for ease of drainage. The work began in 1301.

On 8th June 1661, King Charles II wrote a letter to the Hull Mayor, prohibiting John Shaw from preaching in Holy Trinity, as he was too radical a Puritan. He retained his post as Master of the Charterhouse, and his sermons there continued to draw large crowds, but he resigned the following year.

On 8th June 1806, in a kitchen accident, in Hull, Mrs Lambert reported being struck on the back by a large hanging lump of sugar she had dislodged; she expected that if it had hit her on the head, she would have died.

On 8th June 1815, the Commissioner of Customs acquired the former Neptune Inn, Whitefriargate, as a Custom House. The Inn had opened in 1797, but had never made the expected profit of a first-class coaching inn. The building now houses Boots Chemists.

On 8th June 1821, the troopship Thomas of London was driven on to the Binks sands, in the Humber; the 26 troops, crew, 2 women and a child were rescued, and 1 woman drowned, despite brave attempts by the captain, Lieutenant Pritchard, to save her. The operation by Robert Richardson, master of the Spurn lifeboat, and crew, took 11 hours.

On 8th June 1829, Ira Aldridge, celebrated American actor of African heritage, performed in Hull for the first time, at the Theatre Royal, Humber Street; over a long and distinguished career he visited Hull several times, and performed at the Nag’s Head, Driffield in 1841.

 

Ira-Aldridge-Covent-Garden-1833-public-domain1

June 7th

On 7th June 1614, Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, of Londesborough House, paid for the apprenticeship of his scullery-maid Grace. He trained in London as a barber-surgeon for 7 years, and the Earl continued to support him when he had to transfer employers, as his first employer killed a man (perhaps in the course of treatment).

On 7th June 1672, the residents of Sister-Kirks (Owthorne and Withernsea) reported hearing the sound of the naval battle of Solebay, off the coast of Suffolk. A fleet of 75 Dutch ships surprised a fleet of 93 Anglo-French ships at anchor.

On 7th June 1796, Sir Henry Etherington laid the foundation stone of Hull Anti-Mill, to provide cheaper flour. An early co-operative, it was funded by subscription by poor residents finding the price of flour beyond their reach.

On 7th June 1837, the Union steam packet was in the Humber basin, Hull, Preparing to cross the Humber, when it exploded. 3 other ferries were next to it; 23 people died. The engineer was later charged, but not convicted.

On 7th June 1915, Vere Campey Marshall made a statement to police, stating that he witnessed a 1,000 strong crowd outside the premises of Kress and Wagner, 163/5 Spring Bank, throwing stones, and a girl using a hammer to break a window. Police and military were sent to guard the premises. Anti-German feeling was strong during WW1.

June 1st

On 1st June 1787, William Wilberforce asked the King to make a Royal Proclamation for the Encouragement of Piety and Virtue. Concerned at the large number of death sentences being carried out, he reasoned that those punished for small crimes, such as swearing, would be less likely to commit serious crimes, such as murder. The Society for the Reformation of Manners was established in Hull as a result.

On 1st June 1798, William Wickham, Superintendent of Aliens, wrote advising on the tightening of the Aliens Act, with particular relation to Italian pedlars landing at Hull.

On 1st June 1820, Rev Arthur Strickland and 6 other gentlemen adopted the rules of the Bridlington Cricket Club; cricket was clearly a game for the gentry, as subscriptions were 10s6d. Visitors and occasional residents could be invited to play for the summer. the pitch was in the field between Bessingby and the mill.

On 1st June 1829, Hull’s Junction Dock opened, completing the line of docks connecting the Hull and the Humber, along the line of the old wall . Later renamed Princes Dock after HRH the Prince Consort.

On 1st June 1853, Malton & Driffield Junction Railway opened its 19 miles of track to public traffic.

On 1st June 1875, Alice Elizabeth Rawson was the first person to be baptised in the newly created parish of Newington, in Newington parish Mission Room, Edinburgh St, before the church was built in 1878.

On 1st June 1891, the Royal Baccarat Scandal trial was the first time the heir to the throne was called as a witness in court. It began at a house party at Tranby Croft, Anlaby, (now Hull Collegiate School) home of Charles Wilson,  when Sir William Gordon-Cumming was accused of cheating at cards. Gordon-Cumming lost the slander case, and was dismissed from his army post the day after the trial ended. photo shows Charles Wilson’s memorial in Warter church.

Chas Wilson Nunburnholme

May 23rd

On 23rd May 1260, William de Forz III, count of Aumale and Lord of Holderness, died, aged about 45. He gave away his claim to the earldom of Chester in return for 2 small manors, including Driffield. Acted as ambassador for Henry III to Scotland and France, and was a member of the Council of Fifteen, advising the King on government matters. Gave land to Meaux Abbey on ‘the island called Ravenser Odd in the Humber’. His heir, Thomas, was 6 and he and the count’s lands were put into the King’s care.

On 23rd May 1510, Howden tiler Robert Colstayne claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for ‘the security of his body’; the register gives no detail of who was pursuing him, or why.

On 23rd May 1596, Howden churchwardens gave 6d to 2 poor men (presumably travelling through on their way to their home parish).

On 23rd May 1642, Hull Governor Sir John Hotham called a meeting of ‘knights and gentlemen’ to give a ‘learned speech’ explaining why he refused to allow King Charles into the town. This was part of the ‘paper war’ between the King and Parliament.

On 23rd May 1822, Hull merchant Joseph R. Pease attended a public meeting for the Relief of the Suffering Irish, due to famine in the West. He reported it thinly attended.

On 23rd May 1853, a Government enquiry into electoral corruption was opened at the Mansion House, Hull.  This followed a petition from the Conservative Party objecting to the election of James Clay and Viscount Goderich as MPs for Hull in the previous year. Hull was unrepresented in Parliament for almost 2 years; the Commission sat for 57 days and produced a report weighing over 11 tons and costing £5,000. (and see 16.8)

On 23rd May 1904, on Whit Monday, the Holderness Polo club held a polo match which attracted 6,000 spectators. This was held at the Polo Ground, Westbourne Avenue, Hull (modern Westbourne Ave West to Perth St West)The last matches were played in 1907.

On 23rd May 1907, the Mayoress of Hull opened a new military rifle range at Rolston, for use by Militia, Volunteers and Yeomanry. The land was leased from Rolston Hall.  below – Rolston Hall.

On 23rd May 1911, a fire began in the kitchen chimney of Sledmere House, which 24 hours later had destroyed the whole house. Fire engines from Driffield and Malton attended. There were no injuries.

 

 

Rolston Hall.jpg