July 6th

On 6th July 1381, William Haldene of Beverley had his brains literally knocked out by John Erghom and others, with a pole-axe, 2 battle-axes, 6 swords, 2 forks and other weapons, before his body was thrown into the beck in Walker Lane.

On 6th July 1382, Sir Michael de la Pole leased to John de Hedersee and John of Dimlington land in Myton which included arable land, pasture and at least 30 acres of meadow, with houses, sheepfolds, 600 sheep and 160 lambs. Myton was clearly very rural then.

On 6th July 1537, the body of Sir Robert Constable of Flamborough was displayed on Beverley Gate, Hull, after he was hanged for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace, despite having been pardoned the previous year.

On 6th July 1538, Hull agreed to give a place in the Charterhouse to the wife of a blind man named Ralph, as his carer during his lifetime, taking up a place normally reserved for a man.

On 6th July 1642, Robert & Christopher Hildyard of Winestead, Francis Cobbe of Ottringham, and 300 other Holderness people met King Charles I at Keyingham and handed him a petition against Sir John Hotham’s actions in flooding farmland and taking livestock into Hull. The King was visiting The Providence, which had landed arms from Holland. The King sympathised, but said he could do nothing except raise troops, as he had no power to control Hotham.

On 6th July 1644, the Hull Committee of Sequestrations formally adjudged alderman James Watkinson a delinquent, 2 years after he left Hull to join the Royalist army, and they ordered that his post as alderman be filled by election.

On 6th July 1901, G.E. Conrad Naewiger complained in a letter to the Hull Daily Mail of the lack of steps to Aldbrough beach, a popular destination for works outings from Hull. photo shows Aldbrough cliff.

On 6th July 1910, Arthur Geoffrey Dickens was born in Hull. Professor of History at the University of Hull, he was elected Fellow of the British Academy. Considered the leading historian of the Reformation of his time. Awarded the Order of Merit by the German Government. (died 31.7.2001)

On 6th July 1921, Tilworth Grange was opened to ‘Female mental defectives’ (people with learning disabilities), the first provision in Hull for people who previously were sent to institutions in Bristol, Chesterfield and Ormskirk. Winestead Hall was bought in 1931 for men.

 

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