January 18th

On 18th January 1482, William Rougthwayt, baker, of Beverley, claimed sanctuary in Durham cathedral for killing John Thomson at Beverley on 8 Dec; he claimed it was in self-defence. He wounded Thomson in the thigh with a dagger, and he died of the wound later that day, presumably from loss of blood.

On 18th January 1511, tailor Thomas Bonfay of Everingham claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for the theft of goods and chattels from Nicholas Suttell, a gentleman.

On 18th January 1582, Hull draper William Robertson was fined 5s8d for buying herrings landed from a Scottish ship, against the port regulations. Because he was ignorant of the statute, and promised not to reoffend, he was allowed to keep the herrings.

On 18th January 1801, James Evans was born in Hull. A teacher, Methodist minister and linguist, he developed a script for the previously unwritten Ojibwe and Cree languages, leading to almost universal literacy among speakers of these languages. d23.11.1846 in Canada.

james evans

January 3rd

On 3rd January 1293, a jury set up by order of King Edward I found that the Abbot of Meaux owned most of the town of Wyke on Hull, with Lords Furnivall and Vescy owning smaller parts. They found 74 tenants, and that the Abbot held court there, and that there was space used for fairs and a market.

On 3rd January 1319, King Edward II issued orders at Beverley for defence against the Scots.

On 3rd January 1629, Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, during a typical festive period for the Londesborough household, 84 staff were feasted, with 315 extra dinners and 251 extra suppers being served to tenants and guests during Christmas Week. The York Waits provided musical entertainment, in addition to the house musicians. photo shows the site of the house

On 3rd January 1933, Harry Anderson, age 19, deckie learner, of Edith Grove, Brighton St, Hull, died with 9 other crew of the trawler Endon (H161), after vessel found abandoned after a collision. Trawler Stronsay picked up his body, but superstition about having a corpse on board led them to return his body to the sea.

Londesborough Park

September 21st

On 21st September 1638, Mountjoy Blount, Earl of Newport, sent King Charles’s thanks to Captain William Legge (who replaced Sir John Hotham as governor of Hull) for fortifying Hull and setting up an arsenal for the Scottish campaign.

On 21st September 1875, John William Duncan, aged 14, orphan, left Spring Bank  orphanage to become a cabin boy on a steam ship leaving Hull for Savannah, USA. photo refers to a different organisation – Spring Bank was the home of Hull Mariners’ Church Sailors’ Orphan Society

 

Seamen's orphanage

September 7th

On 7th September 1316, King Edward II issued orders to Beverley to arm the whole male population between ages 16 and 60 against the Scottish threat.

On 7th September 1643, Sir John Hotham was taken from the Tower of London to Parliament to be formally ejected from his seat as MP for Yorkshire.

On 7th September 1646, Sir Michael Wharton of Beverley, considered a Royalist (delinquent) for attending a meeting at Heworth Moor addressed by the King, was fined £4,000 in order to recover his goods which had been sequestered by Parliament. His fine was reduced in 1652. photo shows Warton’s Hospital, Keldgate, Beverley.Warton's Hospital.JPG

On 7th September 1854, Robert Isaac Wilberforce, vicar of Burton Agnes and Archdeacon of the East Riding, resigned his Church of England posts and joined the Catholic Church.  Robert was the second son of William Wilberforce. Of William Wilberforce’s 4 sons, 3 converted to Catholicism and Samuel Wilberforce Bishop of Oxford, then Winchester, was an extreme Anglo-Catholic.

On 7th September 1866, Bull lightship in the Humber was struck by the Prussian barque Emma Johanna and damaged, holed below the water-line. It was taken to Victoria Dock, Hull for repairs by Hull Trinity House.

August 22nd

On 22nd August, 1138, William le Gros, Earl of Albemarle and Lord of Holderness, was made Earl of York, in recognition of his prowess in the Battle of the Standard at Cowton Moor, Northallerton. The 4 standards of St John of Beverley, St Peter of York, St Cuthbert of Durham, and St Wilfred of Ripon, were used as a rallying point for the English against the Scots. The East Riding contingent included a Percy and a de Stuteville. (and see 20.8)

On 22nd August 1572, Thomas Percy, 7thEarl of Northumberland, was executed at York for treason, as leader of the Rising of the North. He was offered mercy if he renounced Catholicism, and refused.  Beatified by the Catholic church. (b 1528, probably in  Leconfield)

On 22nd August 1711, James Rand left £160 in his will for ‘the poor and needful of Preston’. Rands Estate in the village is named for him.

On 22nd August 1917, a bomb from a German Zeppelin destroyed the Primitive Methodist chapel, Baxtergate, Hedon.

On 22nd August 1918, Alfred Buchanan Cheetham of Bean Street, Hull, was killed when the SS Prunelle was torpedoed in the North Sea by a German U-boat. He took part in 3 Polar expeditions, and spent a total of 6 years in the Antarctic, with both Scott and Shackleton. Awarded the Silver Polar Medal clasp, he claimed to have crossed the Antarctic Circle 14 times. Cape Cheetham is named for him. (b 6.5.1867 Liverpool)

On 22nd August 1925, Robin Skelton died aged 72 in victoria, Canada. Poet, literary editor, professor and author of books on wicca. Born in Easington 12.10.1925

 

robin skelton

August 7th

On 7th August 1385, Joan of Kent (the Fair Maid of Kent), mother of King Richard II, died, it is said, of a broken heart.  She was unable to persuade her son King Richard to pardon another son, Sir John Holland, for the murder of Ralph, son of the Earl of Stafford. Holland was in sanctuary in Beverley Minster, and the murder took place nearby, when Richard’s troops were outside Beverley, on their way to the Scottish wars. Holland was pardoned within the year.

On 7th August 1427, Pope Martin V, in reply to a petition (from the parishioners of both Aughton and Bubwith churches and Peter de la Hay), granted permission that, when they were hindered in winter by floods, snow and hail from reaching their parish churches, they could use the chapel of St James in Spaldington for mass and other offices ‘while the hindrances last’.

On 7th August 1663, Robert Hardy of Hessle was enjoined by the Archbishop of York to do penance in Hessle church for his adultery. photo shows All Saints Church, Hessle

On 7th August 1840, a Serious rail accident took place in Howden, in which 4 passengers were killed, and 9 injured. The Hull and Selby Railway had only opened in full on 1st July. The accident was the subject of the first ever report by the Board of Trade into a railway accident.All Saints, Hessle

July 31st

Hull-trawler-memories-1900 steam trawlerOn 31st July 1332, King Edward III sailed from Ravenspurn to battle in Scotland. He also visited Hull, and was reported to be pleased with the progress of the fortifications there.

On 31st July 1899, Hull steam trawler Opal collided with trawler Toronto and was wrecked 160 miles NE of Spurn. photo shows a typical steam trawler of the period.