August 24th

On 24th August 1399, a schism within the church led to controversy about the post of Meaux Abbot Thomas Burton, and rather than involve the abbey in the costs of litigation, he retired and wrote “The Meaux Chronicle’, the history of the abbey.

On 24th August 1662, on Black Bartholomew’s Day, also known as the Great Ejection, Josiah Holdsworth, curate of Sutton-on-Hull, was dismissed for refusing to conform to the Book of Common Prayer, along with 2,000 other Puritan ministers across the country.  They included Anthony Stephenson at Roos, who stayed in the village as physician, and Stephen Arlush of Howden, who continued to preach in a private house as a Congregationalist, also John Ryther of North Ferriby, who spent some years in prison for illegal preaching. And Mr Robinson at Cottingham, Mr Luddington at Sculcoates, Mr Thos Micklethwaite at Cherry Burton.

On 24th August 1759, William Wilberforce was born in High Street, Hull. The Parliamentary champion of the abolition of slavery, he collaborated for 50 years with Thomas Clarkson. MP for Yorkshire 1812-1825. Buried in Westminster Abbey. (d 29.71833)

On 24th August 1789, the Preston house and shop of William Sanderson were broken into by James Hartley of Manchester. Hartley was hanged at York Castle on 17.4.1790.

On 24th August 1921, an R38 airship exploded and crashed into the Humber on its last trial flight; 44 members of the crew died. Debris narrowly missed sightseers on Victoria Pier, Hull. photo shows wreckage

On 24th August 1943, Flight Officer Charles Keirl, 23, and 13 other airmen died when 2 Halifax bombers of 78 Squadron collided in fog; one air gunner survived. Keirl is buried in Queensgate Cemetery, Beverley. There is a memorial at Hull Bridge.

 

R38wreckage1

July 2nd

On 2nd July 1642, the Royalist ship Providence, commissioned by Queen Henrietta Maria, evaded Parliamentary ships by entering Keyingham Creek, which was too narrow for the larger ships, and landed a consignment of arms from Holland for the Royalist army. With help from local people, they unloaded ammunition which was taken to the king at York.

On the same day, the Royalist army secured Hull Bridge, Tickton, on the Beverley side, to prevent attacks from Hull and stop provisions reaching Hull, and evicted constable William Cuthbert and his family at midnight.

On 2nd July 1644, Sir Thomas Metham of Metham near Howden,  died at the Battle of Marston Moor fighting on the Royalist side, captain of the Yorkshire gentlemen volunteers.

On 2nd July 1830, Hull whaler Progress was wrecked in a storm when iced in near the Davis Strait; 19 whalers were wrecked or lost that season, 4 of them from Hull.

On 2nd July 1837, Hull whaler Swan was sighted off Spurn Point as a memorial service was being held in Hull for the crew. They had been away for over a year and had been trapped in ice. 25 of the 48 crew had died.

On 2nd July 1954, Harold Macmillan, Minister of Housing and Local Government, approved the amended Hull Development Plan, regenerating the city after the bomb damage of the war. Hull Georgian Society lamented the loss of buildings such as many on High Street, the whole of Nile Street and houses in Lowgate. Not all of the proposals came about – there was to have been a ‘town park’ open area from Holy Trinity to Princes Dock.