May 9th

On 9th May 1688, Francis Reame was accused in Patrington manor court of not declaring money and a ring he found during building work; it was declared that the items were treasure trove and belonged to the lord of the manor.

On 9th May 1708, the congregation of Cottingham church gave 2s and a penny-halfpenny in a collection for building a protestant church ‘in the Duchy of Berg, within the Empire of Germany’.

On 9th May 1774, 101 Yorkshire emigrants landed at Halifax, Nova Scotia, from Hull aboard The Two Friends. Many were tenants of Beilby Thompson of Escrick, some citing rising rents as their reason for emigrating. In the years 1772-5, 1,000 people emigrated to Nova Scotia from Yorkshire.

On 9th May 1793, Rev Arthur Robinson died in Hull aged 78. He had retired 4 years before as vicar of Holy Trinity (with a gift of civic silver worth £50), but was also vicar of St Giles, Marfleet, whose parishioners said they had seen him only once in 25 years.

On 9th May 1896, Holderness Polo Club held Hull’s first game of polo at Tranby Croft. The teams were Singles and Marrieds; the Singles won 6:5. Later matches were played at a ground in Westbourne Avenue, on land now covered by Westbourne Ave West to Perth St West.

On 9th May 1930, Thomas Robinson Ferens died at the age of 83. The former East Hull MP spoke often in support of women’s rights; was general manager and joint chairman of Reckitts. In his will he left land to the city for an art gallery, for a university college, and large charitable bequests. (b 4.5.1847)

April 19th

 

charterhouse.JPGOn 19th April 1672, Rev John Shaw(e) died aged 64 . Puritan Lecturer at St Mary’s, Hull, then at Holy Trinity. In 1651 Master of the Charterhouse, where so many flocked to hear him preach that troops kept them out.  One Sunday more than 300 people camped out at night as the soldiers had closed all the town’s gates. (b 28.6.1608 Sykehouse)

On 19th April 1689, 4 Beverley aldermen recorded that they were considering prosecuting the vicar of St Mary and St Nicholas, Rev John Brereton. Before then, the town council had recorded their thanks to him for his generous gifts to the town. They then discovered that he had purloined several church collections, as well as money collected for the relief of persecuted French Protestants. 4 days later, Brereton resigned his posts and later left Beverley.

On 19th April 1821, an Act of Parliament approved lighting the town of Hull and adjacent places with gas (replacing lighting with whale oil). Gas manufactured from whale oil was used until 1830, when it was replaced with coal gas.

On 19th April 1891, former pupil of Hull Trinity House School Frank Dick, 23, died of yellow fever in Rio de Janeiro.

On 19th April 1902, Beilby, 3rdBaron Wenlock, of Escrick, spoke at a public meeting in Beverley to recruit for an East Riding Yeomanry Regiment; the meeting was poorly attended, as it was Market day.

 

April 13th

On 13th April 1280, Richard de Vescy, also known as Kesham, was offered the post of Rector of North Ferriby by Lady Agnes de Vescy, but Archbishop Wickwane ran a campaign to remove illegitimate clergy, and declined.  Richard de Vescy and several supporters occupied the church, seized its property, and beat up priests and clerks trying to obtain possession ‘almost to death’. The archbishop did not recover the church until October, and ordered some of the supporters to perform penance.  2 years later, Richard de Vesci was appointed rector of Escrick.

On 13th April 1563, Hull Mayor John Smith presided over a council meeting that agreed that no ships in the Haven should carry a fire or lit candle at night on pain of a fine; this was imposed after a vessel called the Dragon was set alight by negligence, and put other ships nearby in danger. A further law was passed in 1584 prohibiting the heating of tar on board ships, and all gunpowder had to be offloaded within 24 hours of docking, on pain of 8 days in prison, and a 20shilling fine.

On 13th April 1743, Mary Maister (nee Cayley) , her baby son and 2 maidservants, died in a fire at the original Maister House, High Street, Hull, which spread quickly up the wooden staircase.  Henry Maister rebuilt the house the following year with a stone staircase. This National Trust property is currently closed.

On 13th April 1838, Hull & Selby Railway ran an excursion from Selby to Hull, returning the same day.  From Howdendike to Hull by packet boat, arriving Hull 1.00, leaving again 5.00p.m. First class and best cabin 8shillings, 2ndclass & common cabin 6shillings.

On 13th April 1886, Ethel Leginska, nee Liggins, was born in Pemberton Street, Sutton-on-Hull. A musical child prodigy,  she made her debut performance as a pianist on her 9thbirthday, at St George’s Hall, Hull, and was playing in London’s Queen’s Hall the following year. At 11, she went to study in Frankfurt. She was a concert pianist, conductor, teacher and composer. She established the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra, Boston English Opera company, and National Women’s Symphony Orchestra, and was director of Chicago Women’s Symphony Orchestra. (d 26.2.1970) . She was the first woman to conduct many of the world’s leading orchestras, first woman to conduct grand opera (her own opera), and a pioneer for women in music.

Ethel Leginska

 

January 9th

On 9th January 1779, Morfitt Kilham, Richard Basehead, Isaac Cockshaw, John Emerson and Robt Fowler were each paid 1s for a day’s work filling the ice house on Beilby Thompson’s estate at Escrick Hall from the river, together with a share in a cheese worth 4s8d.

On 9th January 1836, Hull Trinity House provided relief to the families of men whose vessels were shipwrecked at the Davis Straits fishery.

On 9th January 1875, drivers Charles Sissons and William Jackson, and conductor Edward Read staffed Hull’s first tram when the Beverley Road line opened, and carried 1,116 passengers on the first day. The fare for the whole distance was 2d. Two trams operated a half hourly service, hauled by Flemish horses.

On 9th January 1935, Clarence Tomlinson aged 17, and 12 (some sources say 14) shipmates, died on board trawler Edgar Wallace off St Andrews Dock, Hull, when the ship foundered on a sand bank and sank, returning to home dock after trip to Bear Island.  The engineer of the salvage team also died when the tug Boatman capsized. 3 survived.

 

 

November 5th

On 5th November  1605, Sir Thomas Knyvet of Escrick, as Gentleman of the Bedchamber to King James I, he went to the House of Lords cellar to investigate a rumour and discovered Guy Fawkes and some gunpowder …

On 5th November 1740, Elizabeth Johnson’s charity distributed money to the 4 poorest families in Cherry Burton every year on this date.  Daughter of Dr Hodgson Johnson, she left £40 to be invested, adding to the 40s left by her father 16 years before.

On 5th November 1804, 7 of the 8 crew of the Cecilia Margaretha of the Duchy of Holstein died when the ship was driven ashore at Mappleton and wrecked on a trip from Liepaja, Russia, to Lisbon. photo shows Mappleton today

On 5th November 1854, James Elliott, private in the Coldstream Guards, died aged 22 at the Battle of Inkerman, Crimea; his memorial in Hedon church was ‘erected … to commemorate the event and to show that Hedon contributed its unit in defence of the liberties of Europe’.

mappleton.JPG

October 25th

On 25th October 1037, Aelfric, Archbishop of York, placed the relics of the recently canonised St John of Beverley in a new shrine of gold and silver, ornamented with precious stones in the Collegiate Church of St John the Evangelist, Beverley.

On 25th October 1415, Michael de la Pole, 3rdEarl of Suffolk, died in battle, with 2 of his brothers. His brother William succeeded as Earl.

On 25th October 1841, Private Stephen Bennington, of Lockington, 20, batman to vet surgeon John Gloag, rode into the Russian guns at the Charge of the Light Brigade, Balaclava, and survived.  He was awarded the Crimea Medal with clasps. Also served at Inkerman and Sebastopol and was discharged from the service in 1859 with long service and good conduct medals. Gloag did not take part in the charge.

Light Brigade

 

June 5th

On 5th June 1618, ‘Blind Richie’ (Richard Graham of Millhill) had walked from the Scottish borders to seek help from Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, at Londesborough, and was given a pension of 10s a year. It is not known what his relationship was to the Earl, who had lands on the Scottish border.

On 5th June 1778, Beilby Thompson of Escrick created a deer park, and demolished most of the village houses, rebuilding them out of sight of the Hall, and recycling the bricks; he paid 5s to Mr Scott the millwright for demolishing the horse mill.

On 5th June 1854, Dr Playfair, from the Dept of Science, reported on the teaching at Hull Trinity House School that no geometry or algebra was taught; geography was badly taught; no empirical data given on laws regulating winds, currents and weather.

On 5th June 1915, German Lieut-Capt Boemack made the first Zeppelin air raid on Yorkshire, dropping bombs on Driffield and Hedon before aborting the mission. There were no casualties, although house windows were broken in Beckside, Driffield, and crops were damaged. Crowds of people flocked to Driffield the following day to view the damage.

 

beilby thompson