October 19th

On 19th October 1469, John Fisher was born in Beverley, the eldest son of Robert and Agnes Fisher. Chancellor of Cambridge University, Bishop of Rochester, and chaplain to royalty.  He was executed for treason 22.6.1535 on Tower Hill, for speaking out against Henry VIII’s divorce, and refusing to acknowledge the heirs of Henry and Ann Boleyn as legitimate successors to the throne. A Catholic martyr, he was canonized as St John Fisher.

On 19th October 1781, Rev George Lambert reported in his diary on a very high tide which inundated many houses in Hull.

On 19th October 1826, a Huggate parish jury of 12 men, 2 affearers (assessors of fines) and the pinder, set penalties for anyone allowing cattle into public lanes at night at 2s6d per head, for the first offence, and 5s per head for every offence afterwards; for allowing pigs in the streets without a ring between May Day and Michaelmas 3d per head; for allowing geese in the streets between Old Mayday and Old Lammas, 1s; for allowing anyone to stay who does not have a certificate allowing them to settle, £1 19s 11d.

On 19th October 1890, John Connell, boatman, of Waxholme, in the Coastguard Service, took part in the rescue of crew from the Grimsby vessel Genesta when it ran aground. All were rescued, except the captain, who died of exposure. Connell went on to the vessel as it was breaking up to rescue a man too weak to help himself. Connell was awarded the Humane Society Silver Medal. The unmanned vessel broke free the following day and travelled to Withernsea.

On 19th October 1964, rail passengers took their last trips on the Hull to Withernsea and Hull to Hornsea rail lines, which closed as a result of the Beeching Report. Goods services to Withernsea continued to 30.4.1965, to Hedon 3.5.1965, and to Marfleet to 1972. photo shows part of Hornsea Rail Trail today.

Hornsea Rail Trail