April 5th

On 5th April 1788, Catherine Savage, of Holme on Spalding Moor, was hanged at York for entering Stephen Ridsdale’s Welton house and stealing clothes. Ridsdale was a tailor and stay maker. Savage’s husband, Abraham, was sentenced to transportation.

On 5th April 1806, George Ormond, 30, of Hull, was hanged at York Castle for forging bank documents from Raper, Clough & Swann Bank, York.

On 5th April 1837, Alexander Gordon Carte, ordnance storekeeper at Hull Citadel, had one of his inventions, Carte’s Sea Service Rocket Apparatus, recommended for adoption by the Liverpool Dock Committee. He also invented the self-adjusting cork lifebelt, and an alarm system. His safety equipment was on view at the Great Exhibition in 1851. photo shows a cork lifelt from the 1860s

On 5th April 1916, Jesse Matthews died of shock in Barnsley Street, Hull, the only casualty of a Zeppelin raid which damaged a house in Portobello Street. The Zeppelin was hit by gunfire.

cork lifebelt, 1860s

March 20th

On 20th March 1735, London merchant Timothy Woolfe died aged 35, and was buried in Bridlington Priory church; he left the interest on £500 to the poor of Bridlington and area, not exceeding 5 miles distance.

On 20th March 1822, an earthquake at night shook beds, moved furniture and rang bells in Seaton Ross, Foggathorpe and Holme on Spalding Moor. It was also felt in Bielby, Everingham, Allerthorpe and Melbourne.

On 20th March 1905, Hull PC Thomas Nettleton died attempting to stop a runaway horse and van, which ran over him.

On 20th March 1947, Fred Stephenson, 36, rode the Kiplingcotes Derby course through 4-foot snowdrifts to ensure the continuation of the race since 1519. The clerk of the course, Harry Ruston, read the rules. It took 90 minutes to ride the course (it normally takes about 10 minutes).

On 20th March 1986, Deirdre Blakeston failed to win the Kiplingcotes Derby when she stopped to give assistance to Lorraine Bell, who was unconscious after her horse collapsed on the course. Horse and rider both recovered and Deirdre eventually finished the race.

Kiplingcotes

November 1st

On 1st November 1151, Adam, a monk from Fountains Abbey, is reported to have led a colony from the older abbey to found the new house of Meaux Abbey.

On 1st November 1831, the Scholfield and Clough Bank was the first bank in Howden declared bankrupt after 14 years. Partner Barnard Clarkson had to sell estates in Kirkham Abbey, Holme on Spalding Moor and Foggathorpe.

On 1st November 1834, Beverley youths lit a bonfire early, rolled lit tar barrels and threw fireballs into shops in Beverley marketplace.

On 1st November 1902, Major E.S.E. Harrison, aged 38, Adjutant, 11thHussars (of the Broadley Harrison family of Welton House) died from a fall during a polo match at Ghezireh, Egypt. He served with distinction in the Boer War (DSO) and bequeathed to the Regiment the Bhurtpoor Sword, now in the Royal Hussars Museum, Winchester.

Major ESE Harrison

September 20th

On 20th September 1188, St John’s church at Beverley and most of the town were damaged by fire. St John’s remains were not found until 1197.

On 20th September 1535, John Colynson and Thomas Savage, yeomen of Holme on Spalding Moor were declared outlaws after spending more than a year in sanctuary in Ripon. They sought sanctuary in 1534, confessing to stealing a horse. Savage confessed to the murder of Amery Burdett, but Colynson did not confess, though a coroner’s jury found them both responsible, and indicted others as accessories.

On 20th September 1769, Felice de Giardini, famous violinist, played at the start of a 3-day festival to celebrate the installation of the new organ at Beverley Minster, the first festival of its type in the north of England. New music by Handel was performed, including the recently completed Messiah; tickets were 2s6d and 5s.

On 20th September 1779, Mr Foster, Bridlington quay master, reported that John Paul Jones’ American squadron of ships had attacked a large fleet of colliers and ran them into the harbour.

On 20th September 1813, Thomas Nutbrown was born in Eastrington.  Probably the same person who, aged 14 in 1828, applied to the Howden poor relief officers for some new clothes, and was granted a second hand coat. He died aged 72 in Leeds Township, Quebec, Canada, on 25 Sept 1885.

On 20th September 1883, Rev Edward Cragg Haynes died aged 62 in Swinefleet, after serving there for 32 years. Born in Barbados, classed as ’free coloured’, had links to the Clapham Sect. Set up a Grammar School in Swinefleet attended among others by Joseph Rank. (christened 3.6.1821)

On 20th September 1902, Stevie Smith was born Florence Margaret Smith in Hull. Poet and novelist, most famous for ‘Not waving but drowning’. D 7.3.1971 see photo

On 20th September 1903, Annie Marshall, 16, domestic servant, from Lissett, was raped, shot twice, suffocated with grass and thrown in the river at Scampston by Charles William Ashton, 19, of Cottingham, farmhand.  Ashton knew her well. He was found guilty of murder and hanged at Hull Prison on 11thDecember the same year.

On 20th September 1954, the Selby to Driffield rail line was closed for regular passenger traffic, a service of one regular non stop train each way plus occasional summer excursions ran until June 1965. The line was abandoned after the last freight train ran later that year.

On 20th September 1955, Robert Greenwood Tarran, of the Wolds, Beverley High Road, Hull, died aged 63. Civil engineering contractor, and founder of Tarran Industries Ltd, former Sheriff of Hull, and chief Air Raid Warden during WW2. He moved the Wilberforce monument, at his own expense, and was responsible for building 20,000 prefabs after the war. He was also suspected of complicity in profiting from deals over council land in Endike Lane, in a law case during which his colleague Digby Willoughby committed suicide.

StevieSmith

August 5th

On 5th August 1661, Marmaduke Langdale, 1stBaron Langdale of Holme, died, aged 63, at Holme on Spalding Moor. High Sheriff of Yorkshire 1639. Joined the Royalist side in the Civil War, and had a distinguished military career, being imprisoned and escaping twice. He was ennobled by Charles II in exile and returned from exile at the Restoration, becoming Lieutenant of the West Riding.

On 5th August 1664, Peter Rawson of Hull was indicted as a common disturber of the peace.

On 5th August 1918, the last Zeppelin raid on Hull took place.  Visibility was good, and it was driven away by searchlights. No casualties.Marmaduke_Langdale2

August 3rd

On 3rd August 1349, John de Preston was elected Prior of North Ferriby on the death of John de Beverley, himself elected Prior just 10 days earlier on 24thJuly, when he succeeded the previous Prior Walter de Hessell on his death. This outbreak of the Black Death killed 35 out of 95 parish priests in East Yorkshire, and presumably a similar proportion of the general population.

On 3rd August 1523, Thomas Senexer, yeoman, of Holme on Spalding Moor, claimed sanctuary at the church of St John, Beverley, for debt. photo shows the Frith Stool (sanctuary chair)

On 3rd August 1732, Robert Cook was killed when he fell from a wagon at one of the chalk pits in Hutton.

On 3rd August 1798, Press Gang seamen John Sykes and John Burnock or Burnick were killed when attempting to press the crew of the returning whaler Blenheim (& see 2.8). The fight was watched by crowds on the dockside. Capt Mitchinson was charged with murder (& see 31.3) The navy men were buried in Drypool Cemetery.

On 3rd August 1878, for 1d working people could attend a lecture on ‘The Yorkshire Wolds in Prehistory’ as part of Hull Literary and Philosophical Society’s new series of lectures to the working classes in the Exchange Building, aimed at keeping working people occupied during the new Saturday half holiday.

On 3rd August 1942, Mrs Frances Snowden, Lieut Stanley Lawrence and Charles Cross were killed when 4 bombs were dropped on Flemingate, Beverley, damaging Hodgson’s Tannery and destroying a house, a medical centre and a warden’s post. 15 people were injured, some of them machine-gunned by the German bomber.

minster - frith stool.JPG

July 25th

On 25th July each year a traditional football match was held on St James Day, between Sutton and Wawne, starting at Foredyke bridge, boundary between the 2 villages, each village trying to get the ball home. Not known dates played or when abandoned.

On 25th July 1328, King Edward III is said to have closed down the Warter annual fair on St James Feast Day because of the number of murders that had been committed at the fair. There is a record that in 1300 certain manslaughters had been committed in the village by the canons’ men from Warter Priory. In 1328, King Edward III issued an order that it was an offence to go armed into any fair or market. Probably not aimed specifically at Warter.

On 25th July 1768, Joseph Hall was hanged at York Castle for coining at Hull. photo shows  medieval coins being made.

On 25th July 1873, William Dunwell, former Hull Trinity House School pupil, lost his life at sea by jumping overboard to save the life of a shipmate.

On 25th July 1911, Father Ottway, superintendant at the Yorkshire Catholic Reformatory at Market Weighton (actually in Holme on Spalding Moor) reported on rebellion from the boys, including threats to knife masters, which resulted in the attendance of 3 police officers and the thrashing of 6 or 7 boys.

coiner, Hanse Day